Asked By: Jacob Barnes Date: created: Nov 26 2023

How many hours after taking cold medicine can you drink alcohol

Answered By: Juan Brooks Date: created: Nov 26 2023

Can You Drink Alcohol After Taking DayQuil and Vice Versa? – DayQuil’s effects last approximately 4 to 6 hours depending on how you’re feeling. It’s not recommended to mix the two but you can have a drink after 4 to 6 hours from when you took your last dose.

Asked By: Clifford James Date: created: Mar 15 2023

Can I take Mucinex after 4 hours

Answered By: Gregory Barnes Date: created: Mar 17 2023

Take this medication by mouth with or without food, usually every 4 to 6 hours as needed, or as directed by your doctor. Drink plenty of fluids when you use this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor. The fluid will help loosen the mucus in your lungs.

Asked By: Xavier Watson Date: created: Jul 20 2023

Can I take Mucinex after 3 hours

Answered By: Christian Hall Date: created: Jul 20 2023

Drug class: Expectorants adults and children 12 years of age and over: 1 or 2 tablets every 12 hours. Do not exceed 4 tablets in 24 hours.

Does Mucinex make you sleepy?

Does Mucinex DM cause drowsiness? – Yes, Mucinex DM may cause drowsiness as one of its side effects. It contains an ingredient called dextromethorphan, which can cause drowsiness and affect your ability to drive or operate machinery. It is advisable to avoid alcohol while taking this medication.

Asked By: Curtis Davis Date: created: Aug 25 2023

How much water should you drink after taking Mucinex

Answered By: Alejandro Carter Date: created: Aug 28 2023

Instructions – Drink the medicine. Measure the dose of liquid medicine carefully. Use the measuring device that come with the medicine. If you do not have one, please ask your pharmacist for help. This medicine may be taken with or without food. Swallow with a full glass (8 oz) of water unless your doctor gives you different instructions.

  • Eep the medicine at room temperature.
  • Avoid heat and direct light.
  • Drink extra water while on this medicine.
  • Adults should try to drink 6-8 cups (48 to 64 oz.) of water every day.
  • Please tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the medicines you take.
  • Include both prescription and over-the-counter medicines.

Also tell them about any vitamins, herbal medicines, or anything else you take for your health. Do not take the medicine more than six times during 24 hours.

Can you drink 7 hours after taking Mucinex?

You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking Mucinex. Mixing alcohol and dextromethorphan, a cough suppressant in some Mucinex products, can cause dizziness, drowsiness, nausea and vomiting. Alcohol and Mucinex can also cause liver damage.

Why can’t you take Mucinex before bed?

Mucinex and Nyquil Cold & Flu are two common over-the-counter remedies. They can be taken together, but not at night. Mucinex can cause coughing, making it hard to get a good night’s sleep. Compare the symptoms that each drug treats as well as their side effects, interactions, and warnings to see if one is a better option for you.

  1. The main differences between these drugs are their active ingredients and how those work to treat your symptoms.
  2. Mucinex treats chest congestion.
  3. The main active ingredient is an expectorant called guaifenesin.
  4. It works by thinning the consistency of mucus in your air passages.
  5. This loosens up mucus in your chest so you can cough it up and out.

NyQuil temporarily treats common cold and flu symptoms such as fever, cough, nasal congestion, minor aches and pains, headache, and runny nose and sneezing. The active ingredients are acetaminophen, dextromethorphan, and doxylamine. These ingredients each work a little differently.

  1. For example, acetaminophen is a pain reliever and fever reducer.
  2. It changes the way your body senses pain and regulates temperature.
  3. Dextromethorphan suppresses the signals in your brain that trigger your coughing reflex.
  4. Doxylamine, on the other hand, blocks a substance in your body called histamine.
  5. This substance causes allergy symptoms such as itchy, watery eyes, runny nose, and itchy nose or throat.

Together, these ingredients provide the relief you can get from NyQuil. The following table summarizes the differences between Mucinex and NyQuil at a glance.

Can I take Mucinex night after drinking?

Notes for Consumers: Do not drink alcohol while taking this medication. Drinking alcohol while taking this medication can cause serious side effects, such as central nervous system (CNS) depression, and can increase the risk of falling.

What are side effects of Mucinex?

Serious side effects of Mucinex – WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

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Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever ; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing, swallowing, or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat. Cough that does not go away.

Can you take 2 Mucinex at once?

Maximum-strength tablets – Mucinex and Mucinex DM tablets also both come in maximum-strength versions. These medicines contain double the amount of active ingredients. You should take no more than one maximum-strength tablet every 12 hours. Do not take more than two tablets in 24 hours.

Does Mucinex help with phlegm in throat?

10. Does Mucinex get rid of phlegm in the throat? – Yes, Mucinex gets rid of phlegm in the throat. Its main function is to remove phlegm from the throat, airway, and lungs.

Asked By: Sebastian Bailey Date: created: Apr 25 2023

Can I drink alcohol after 4 hours of taking medicine

Answered By: Aidan Lewis Date: created: Apr 25 2023

Timing is important – Alcohol and medicines can interact harmfully even if they are not taken at the same time. Mixing alcohol and medicines puts you at risk for dangerous reactions. Protect yourself by avoiding alcohol if you are taking a medication and don’t know its effect.

Commonly Used Medicines (Both Prescription and Over-the-Counter) That Interact With Alcohol

Symptom/Disorders Medication (Brand name) Medication (Generic name) Some possible reactions with alcohol
Allergies/Colds/Flu

Alavert®

Loratadine Drowsiness, dizziness; increased risk for overdose

Atarax®

Hydroxyzine

Benadryl®

Diphenhydramine

Clarinex®

Desloratadine

Claritin®, Claritin-D®

Loratadine

Dimetapp® Cold &Allergy

Brompheniramine

Sudafed® Sinus & Allergy

Chlorpheniramine

Triaminic® Cold & Allergy

Chlorpheniramine

Tylenol® Allergy Sinus

Chlorpheniramine

Tylenol® Cold & Flu

Chlorpheniramine

Zyrtec®

Cetirizine
Angina (chest pain), coronary heart disease

Isordil®

Isosorbide Nitroglycerin Rapid heartbeat, sudden changes in blood pressure, dizziness, fainting
Anxiety and epilepsy

Ativan®

Lorazepam Drowsiness, dizziness; increased risk for overdose; slowed or difficulty breathing; impaired motor control; unusual behavior; memory problems

BuSpar®

Buspirone

Klonopin®

Clonazepam

Librium®

Chlordiazepoxide

Paxil®

Paroxetine

Valium®

Diazepam

Xanax®

Alprazolam

Herbal preparations (Kava Kava)

Liver damage, drowsiness
Arthritis

Celebrex®

Celecoxib Ulcers, stomach bleeding, liver damage

Naprosyn®

Naproxen

Voltaren®

Diclofenac
Attention and concentration (Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder)

Adderall®

Amphetamine/dextro-amphetamine Dizziness, drowsiness, impaired concentration (methylphenidate, dexmethylphenidate); possible increased risk for heart problems (amphetamine, dextroamphetamine, lisdexamfetamine); liver damage (atomoxetine)

Concerta®, Ritalin®

Methylphenidate

Dexedrine®

Dextroamphetamine

Focalin®

Dexmethylphenidate

Strattera®

Atomoxetine

Vyvanse®

Lisdexamfetamine
Blood clots

Coumadin®

Warfarin Occasional drinking may lead to internal bleeding; heavier drinking also may cause bleeding or may have the opposite effect, resulting in possible blood clots, strokes, or heart attacks
Cough

Delsym®, Robitussin Cough®

Dextromethorpan Drowsiness, dizziness; increased risk for overdose

Robitussin A–C®

Guaifenesin + codeine
Depression

Abilify®

Aripriprazone Drowsiness, dizziness; increased risk for overdose; increased feelings of depression or hopelessness (all medications); impaired motor control (quetiapine, mirtazapine); increased alcohol effect (bupropion); liver damage (duloxetine) Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), such as tranylcypromine and phenelzine, when combined with alcohol, may result in serious heart-related side effects. Risk for dangerously high blood pressure is increased when MAOIs are mixed with tyramine, a byproduct found in beer and red wine

Anafranil®

Clomipramine

Celexa®

Citalopram

Clozaril®

Clozapine

Cymbalta®

Duloxetine

Desyrel®

Trazodone

Effexor®

Venlafaxine

Elavil®

Amitriptyline

Geodon®

Ziprasidone

Invega®

Paliperidone

Lexapro®

Escitalopram

Luvox®

Fluvoxamine

Nardil®

Phenelzine

Norpramin®

Desipramine

Pamate®

Tranylcypromine

Paxil®

Paroxetine

Pristiq®

Desevenlafaxine

Prozac®

Fluoxetine

Remeron®

Mirtazapine

Risperdal®

Risperidone

Seroquel®

Quetiapine

Serzone®

Nefazodone

Symbyax®

Fluoxetine/Olanzapine

Wellbutrin®

Bupropion

Zoloft®

Sertraline

Zyprexa®

Olanzapine

Herbal preparations (St. John’s Wort)

Diabetes

Diabinese®

Chlorpropamide Abnormally low blood sugar levels, flushing reaction (nausea, vomiting, headache, rapid heartbeat, sudden changes in blood pressure); symptoms of nausea and weakness may occur (metformin)

Glucotrol®

Glipizide

Glucophage®

Metformin

Glynase®, DiaBeta®, Micronase®

Glyburide

Orinase®

Tolbutamide

Tolinase®

Tolazamide
Enlarged prostate

Cardura®

Doxazosin Dizziness, light headedness, fainting

Flomax®

Tamsulosin

Hytrin®

Terazosin

Minipress®

Prazosin
Heartburn, indigestion, sour stomach

Axid®

Nizatidine Rapid heartbeat; increased alcohol effect; sudden changes in blood pressure (metoclopramide)

Reglan®

Metoclopramide

Tagamet®

Cimetidine

Zantac®

Ranitidine
High blood pressure

Accupril®

Quinapril Dizziness, fainting, drowsiness; heart problems such as changes in the heart’s regular heartbeat (arrhythmia)

Calan®

Verapamil

Capozide®

Hydrochlorothiazide

Cardura®

Doxazosin

Catapres®

Clonidine

Cozaar®

Losartan

Hytrin®

Terazosin

Lopressor® HCT

Hydrochlorothiazide

Lotensin®

Benzapril

Minipress®

Prazosin

Norvasc®

Amlodipine mesylate

Prinivil®, Zestril®

Lisinopril

Vaseretic®

Enalapril
High cholesterol

Advicor®

Lovastatin + Niacin Liver damage (all medications); increased flushing and itching (niacin), increased stomach bleeding (pravastatin + aspirin)

Altocor®

Lovastatin

Crestor®

Rosuvastatin

Lipitor®

Atorvastatin

Mevacor®

Lovastatin

Niaspan®

Niacin

Pravachol®

Pravastatin

Pravigard™

Pravastatin + Aspirin

Vytorin™

Ezetimibe + Simvastatin

Zocor®

Simvastatin
Infections

Acrodantin®

Nitrofurantoin Fast heartbeat, sudden changes in blood pressure; stomach pain, upset stomach, vomiting, headache, or flushing or redness of the face; liver damage (isoniazid, ketoconazole)

Flagyl®

Metronidazole

Grisactin®

Griseofulvin

Nizoral®

Ketoconazole

Nydrazid®

Isoniazid

Seromycin®

Cycloserine

Tindamax®

Tinidazole

Zithromax®

Azithromycin
Mood stabilizers

Depakene®, Depakote®

Valproic acid Drowsiness, dizziness; tremors; increased risk for side effects, such as restlessness, impaired motor control; loss of appetite; stomach upset; irregular bowel movement; joint or muscle pain; depression; liver damage (valproic acid)

Eskalith®, Eskalith®CR, Lithobid

Lithium
Muscle pain

Flexeril®

Cyclobenzaprine Drowsiness, dizziness; increased risk of seizures; increased risk for overdose; slowed or difficulty breathing; impaired motor control; unusual behavior; memory problems

Soma®

Carisoprodol
Nausea, motion sickness

Antivert®

Meclizine Drowsiness, dizziness; increased risk for overdose

Dramamine®

Dimenhydrinate

Phenergan®

Promethazine
Pain (such as muscle ache, minor arthritis pain), fever, inflammation

Advil®

Ibuprofen Stomach upset, bleeding and ulcers; liver damage (acetaminophen); rapid heartbeat

Aleve®

Naproxen

Excedrin®

Aspirin, Acetaminophen

Motrin®

Ibuprofen

Tylenol®

Acetaminophen
Seizures

Dilantin®

Phenytoin Drowsiness, dizziness; increased risk of seizures (levetiracetam, phenytoin); unusual behavior and changes in mental health (such as thoughts of suicide) (topiramate)

Horizant®, Neurontin®

Gabapentin

Keppra®

Levetiracetam

Klonopin®

Clonazepam
Phenobarbital

Lamictal®

Lamotrigine

Lyrica®

Pregabalin

Tegretol®

Carbamazepine

Topamax®

Topiramate

Trileptal®

Oxcarbazepine
Barbiturates
Severe pain from injury, postsurgical care, oral surgery, migraines

Darvocet–N®

Propoxyphene Drowsiness, dizziness; increased risk for overdose; slowed or difficulty breathing; impaired motor control; unusual behavior; memory problems

Demerol®

Merepidine

Fiorinal® with codeine

Butalbital + codeine

Percocet®

Oxycodone

Vicodin®

Hydrocodone
Sleep problems

Ambien®

Zolpidem Drowsiness, sleepiness, dizziness; slowed or difficulty breathing; impaired motor control; unusual behavior; memory problems

Lunesta™

Eszopiclone

Prosom™

Estazolam

Restoril®

Temazepam

Sominex®

Diphenhydramine

Unisom®

Doxylamine

Herbal preparations (chamomile, valerian, lavender)

Increased drowsiness
Asked By: Caleb Diaz Date: created: Dec 08 2023

Can I drink alcohol after 2 hours of taking medication

Answered By: Jordan Richardson Date: created: Dec 08 2023

Over the counter painkillers – Drinking within the UK low risk drinking guidelines while taking a standard dose of most over-the-counter painkillers such as paracetamol and ibuprofen is unlikely to cause any problems. But you should always read the leaflet that comes with the medication and get further advice from your pharmacist or doctor if you need it.

How long should you wait to drink after taking cough medicine?

November 12, 2014 5 Minute Read How Long After Taking Mucinex Can I Drink Alcohol The holiday season is filled with good spirits—both the type you can feel and the type you can drink! With end of the year celebrations quickly approaching, people living with HIV—in addition to people taking medication for other conditions—may wonder how alcohol affects their health and how it might interact with their medications.

Here, I’ll highlight some things to look out for if you’re taking medications and plan on drinking, so that you can raise your glass in celebration with friends, family, and loved ones without worry. About half of American adults report drinking on a regular basis—which we know can be beneficial if it’s done in moderation.

Observational studies have pointed to benefits such as lowered risk of cardiovascular disease and better brain functioning in later years. On the other hand, excessive drinking increases risk of liver disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, stroke and many other health conditions.

For most people, having some alcohol is usually okay, but heavy drinking can be harmful. And we define heavy drinking as, for women, having three or more drinks per day, or more than seven drinks per week. For men, heavy drinking means having four or more drinks per day or more than 14 drinks per week.

Binge drinking—when a larger quantity of alcohol is consumed in a short period of time—can also be harmful. But what about drinking when you’re taking medications? Is moderation still the key? This is one of the most common questions pharmacists get asked.

  • And it’s a great question—it’s always important to know how alcohol may interact with the medications you’re taking since many medications don’t mix well with alcohol.
  • Alcohol can interfere with the way your body processes medications, change how medications work in your body, or create or make side effects worse.

The good news is that there really aren’t many direct effects of alcohol on how HIV medications are processed by your body—so drinking in moderation is usually okay if you’re taking antiretrovirals. That being said, there are a few things to be aware of if you’re drinking more heavily.

  • Drinking alcohol increases the availability of abacavir (Ziagen, also contained in Trizivir, Epzicom, and Combivir) in your body by about 41%.
  • This is not a big enough increase to require a lower abacavir dose—but it does mean you’re more likely to experience abacavir-related side effects.
  • So you should watch out for increased nausea or headache and be sure to report these to your doctor if you experience them.

Heavy alcohol use with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors can cause hepatotoxicity (liver inflammation). Heavy alcohol use while taking didanosine (Videx) or stavudine (Zerit) can also cause or worsen peripheral neuropathy (nerve damage that causes tingling or pain in the limbs).

If you’re taking one of these medications, be sure to check in regularly with your doctor about how much and how often you drink. Having an occasional cocktail while taking HIV antiretrovirals usually will not cause problems, but there are many other medications that can be harmful when mixed with alcohol.

Drinking alcohol if you’re taking an over-the-counter cough, cold, or allergy medicine like Benadryl, Zyrtec, or Robitussin can make you feel more drowsy, dizzy, or sedated. There really isn’t a hard and fast rule about how long to wait after taking one of these medications before having a drink.

  1. That’s because each of these medicines lasts a different amount of time in the body, and each person may feel a different amount of drowsiness from them.
  2. The best thing to do in in this situation is to ask your community pharmacist for advice.
  3. He or she will be able to give you individualized guidance based on the medication you’re taking, your weight, and your gender.

Taking the pain medications oxycodone or Vicodin, the anxiety medications Klonopin and Ativan, or the muscle relaxer Flexeril before or after you drink can be really dangerous. These meds will increase the depressant effects of alcohol—slowing your breathing, making you drowsy, and worsening your muscle control.

If possible, avoid alcohol altogether if you are taking any of these medicines. The over-the-counter medication acetaminophen (Tylenol) can cause really serious problems if it’s used in the wrong way with alcohol. Since this is such a common medication (and likely, one that most people have in their medicine cabinet) it’s important to understand the circumstances when it can cause health concerns.

You also shouldn’t take acetaminophen (Tylenol) on a regular basis if you drink alcohol regularly. Both alcohol and acetaminophen, separately, can harm your liver when used frequently over a long period of time. But the combined effects of acetaminophen and alcohol can be even worse—for your liver and for your kidneys.

If you drink alcohol regularly, use another over-the-counter painkiller like ibuprofen, or use acetaminophen sparingly. Or, if you’re taking acetaminophen on a regular basis for chronic pain, you should try to limit your alcohol use to an occasional glass. Remember, unless your doctor tells you otherwise, you should not be taking any more than 3000 mg of acetaminophen per day, or 2000 mg if you have liver disease.

If you’re diabetic, drinking alcohol may produce very low blood sugar levels up to six or eight hours later. This can add to the blood sugar-lowering effects of diabetes medications like glyburide or glipizide—making you feel dizzy, weak, shaky, and tired.

  • Drinking large amounts of alcohol if you’re diabetic and taking these medicines may cause your blood sugar levels to drop dramatically, leading to a serious condition called ketoacidosis.
  • This means you should drink alcohol only in moderation and carry snacks and your blood sugar monitor with you.
  • Many high blood pressure medications such as metoprolol, benazepril, and amlodipine may make you feel dizzy or drowsy if you drink alcohol.

There’s also a risk of fainting associated with alcohol use and these medications. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) such as phenylzine, prescribed for depression, don’t interact well with alcohol. If you’re taking an MAOI and drinking alcohol, there’s a risk that you could experience a hypertensive crisis—when blood pressure rises to dangerous levels.

This is a very serious condition that requires immediate, emergency medical treatment. While these are the most common medications people take that interact with alcohol, this list is not comprehensive. So, if you have questions about your medications and how they mix with alcohol, it’s best to check in with your doctor and your pharmacist.

Knowing ahead of time how your meds will interact with alcohol will help you enjoy your holiday parties while taking care of your health. Jennifer Cocohoba, PharmD, is an associate clinical professor in the School of Pharmacy at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).

Since 2004, she has worked as the clinical pharmacist for the UCSF Women’s HIV Program, where she provides adherence support and medication information to patients and providers. Selected References Barve S., Kapoor R., Moghe A., and others. Focus on the Liver: Alcohol Use, Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy, and Liver Disease in HIV-Infected Patients.

Brown J.L. and others. Interventions to reduce alcohol use among HIV-Infected individuals: A review and critique of the literature. Current HIV/AIDS Reports 10(4): 356-370. August 30, 2013. Hendershot C.S. and others. Alcohol use and antiretroviral adherence: Review and meta-analysis,

Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome 52(2): 180-202. October 1, 2009. McNicholl I. HIV Insite Database of Antiretroviral Drug Interactions: Interactions with Ethanol (Alcohol, Ethanol, Wine, Liquor, Beer, Spirits) and Antiretrovirals. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Harmful interactions: Mixing alcohol with medicines.U.S.

Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010.

Does Mucinex really last 12 hours?

Mucinex Extended-release Bi-layer tablets provide powerful symptom relief. The product relieves chest congestion, thins and loosens mucus and lasts for 12 hours.

How long should I wait to take Mucinex?

How to use Mucinex. Take this medication by mouth with or without food, as directed by your doctor, usually every 12 hours with a full glass of water.

What happens if I drink alcohol after taking Mucinex?

Mixing Alcohol and Mucinex DM While guaifenesin does not have any drug interactions with alcohol, mixing dextromethorphan and alcohol can increase the risk of central nervous system side effects: Dizziness. Sleepiness. Difficulty concentrating.

Can I take Mucinex after 3 hours?

Drug class: Expectorants adults and children 12 years of age and over: 1 or 2 tablets every 12 hours. Do not exceed 4 tablets in 24 hours.

Asked By: Chase Campbell Date: created: Jun 13 2023

Does Mucinex night time have alcohol

Answered By: George Barnes Date: created: Jun 14 2023

Some brands of this product may contain sugar, alcohol, or aspartame. Caution is advised if you have diabetes, alcohol dependence, liver disease, phenylketonuria (PKU), or any other condition that requires you to limit/avoid these substances in your diet. Ask your doctor or pharmacist about using this product safely.

Asked By: Bernard Patterson Date: created: Apr 08 2023

How long after taking paracetamol can you drink alcohol

Answered By: Christopher Jones Date: created: Apr 09 2023

Can I drink alcohol while taking paracetamol? Drinking a small amount of alcohol while taking paracetamol is usually safe. Try to keep to the recommended guidelines of no more than 14 units of alcohol a week.