Asked By: Wallace Rivera Date: created: Nov 30 2023

Can I eat yogurt 2 hours after taking Cipro

Answered By: Fred Brooks Date: created: Dec 03 2023

Avoid taking this medicine with foods containing large amounts of calcium, like milk, yogurt, or cheese.

Can I have milk 2 hours after taking Cipro?

It’s best to avoid taking ciprofloxacin with dairy products (like milk, cheese, and yogurt) or drinks fortified with calcium (like dairy-free milks or calcium-fortified juices). Try to separate these products from ciprofloxacin by at least 2 hours.

What happens if you eat dairy products while taking ciprofloxacin?

Taking Cipro with food – Cipro can be taken with or without food. Either way you take it, be sure to drink plenty of fluids while taking Cipro. Cipro should not be taken along with dairy products or calcium-fortified juices. It should be taken at least two hours before or after consuming these products.

How long after taking Cipro can I eat ice cream?

2. Some Antibiotics + Dairy – Nouhavandi says certain antibiotics shouldn’t be taken alongside milk, yogurt, or cheese, “Dairy products bind to the medicine and interfere with its absorption in the bloodstream,” she says. This goes for fluoroquinolones like Cipro (ciprofloxacin), Levaquin (levofloxacin), Avelox (moxifloxacin), and certain tetracyclines.

Can I drink milk after taking ciprofloxacin?

Precautions – It is very important that your doctor check your or your child’s progress while you are using this medicine. This will allow your doctor to see if the medicine is working properly and to decide if you should continue to use it. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects.

  • If your or your child’s symptoms do not improve within a few days, or if they become worse, check with your doctor.
  • Do not use this medicine if you are also taking tizanidine (Zanaflex®).
  • Tell your doctor if you or your child are also using theophylline (Theo-Dur®) or other products that contain caffeine (eg, coffee, soda, chocolate).

Using these medicines together may increase the risk for more serious side effects. Ciprofloxacin may rarely cause inflammation (tendinitis) or tearing of a tendon (the cord that attaches muscles to bones). This can occur while you are taking the medicine or after you finish taking it.

The risk of having tendon problems may be increased if you are over 60 years of age, are using steroid medicines (eg, dexamethasone, prednisolone, prednisone, Medrol®), have severe kidney problems, have a history of tendon problems (eg, rheumatoid arthritis), or if you have received an organ transplant (eg, heart, kidney, or lung).

Check with your doctor right away if you have sudden pain or swelling in a tendon after exercise (eg, ankle, back of the knee or leg, shoulder, elbow, or wrist), bruise more easily after an injury, or are unable to bear weight or move the affected area.

Refrain from exercise until your doctor says otherwise. Tell your doctor right away if you have feeling anxious, confused, or depressed, seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not there, seizures, severe headache, trouble sleeping, or unusual thoughts or behaviors. These may be symptoms of serious mental problems.

This medicine may cause serious allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis, which can be life-threatening and require immediate medical attention. Call your doctor right away if you or your child have a rash, itching, hives, hoarseness, trouble or swallowing, or any swelling of your hands, face, mouth, or throat after you take this medicine.

Serious side effects can occur during treatment with this medicine and can sometimes occur without warning. However, possible warning signs include: black, tarry stools, blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin, bloody or cloudy urine, chills, decreased urination, diarrhea, fever, joint or muscle pain, red skin lesions, often with a purple center, sores, ulcers, or white spots in the mouth or on the lips, severe stomach pain, skin rash, swelling of the face, fingers, feet, or lower legs, unusual bleeding or bruising, unusual weight gain, or yellow skin or eyes.

Check with your doctor immediately if you or your child notice any of these warning signs. Check with your doctor right away if you have dark urine, clay-colored stools, stomach pain, or yellow eyes or skin. These maybe symptoms of a serious liver problem.

Ciprofloxacin may lower the number of some types of blood cells in your body. Because of this, you may bleed or get infections more easily. To help with these problems, avoid being near people who are sick or have infections. Wash your hands often. Stay away from rough sports or other situations where you could be bruised, cut, or injured.

Brush and floss your teeth gently. Be careful when using sharp objects, including razors and fingernail clippers. Ciprofloxacin may cause diarrhea, and in some cases it can be severe. It may occur 2 months or more after you or your child stop taking this medicine.

Do not take any medicine to treat diarrhea without first checking with your doctor. Diarrhea medicines may make the diarrhea worse or make it last longer. If you have any questions about this or if mild diarrhea continues or gets worse, check with your doctor. Check with your doctor right away if you or your child start having numbness, tingling, or burning pain in your hands, arms, legs, or feet.

These may be symptoms of a condition called peripheral neuropathy. This medicine may increase your risk for aortic aneurysm (bulge in the wall of the largest artery). Check with your doctor right away if you have sudden chest, stomach, or back pain, trouble breathing, cough, or hoarseness.

  • Stay out of direct sunlight, especially between the hours of 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM, if possible.
  • Wear protective clothing, including a hat and sunglasses.
  • Apply a sun block product that has a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15. Some people may require a product with a higher SPF number, especially if they have a fair complexion. If you have any questions about this, check with your doctor.
  • Do not use a sun lamp or tanning bed or booth.

If you have a severe reaction from the sun, check with your doctor. Ciprofloxacin may cause some people to become dizzy, lightheaded, drowsy, or less alert than they are normally. Do not drive or do anything else that could be dangerous until you know how this medicine affects you.

If these reactions are especially bothersome, check with your doctor. If you are a diabetic patient taking diabetes medicine by mouth: Ciprofloxacin may cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) in some patients. Symptoms of low blood sugar must be treated before they lead to unconsciousness (passing out).

Different people may feel different symptoms of low blood sugar. If you experience symptoms of low blood sugar, check with your doctor right away.

Symptoms of low blood sugar can include: anxiety, behavior change similar to being drunk, blurred vision, cold sweats, confusion, cool pale skin, difficulty with concentrating, drowsiness, excessive hunger, headache, nausea, nervousness, rapid heartbeat, shakiness, or unusual tiredness or weakness.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter ) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.

Asked By: Lucas Torres Date: created: Oct 09 2023

Can I eat chocolate after ciprofloxacin

Answered By: Colin Kelly Date: created: Oct 10 2023

Before taking ciprofloxacin, –

tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic or have had a severe reaction to ciprofloxacin. any other quinolone or fluoroquinolone antibiotic such as delafloxacin (Baxdela), gemifloxacin (Factive), levofloxacin (Levaquin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), and ofloxacin; any other medications, or if you are allergic to any of the ingredients in ciprofloxacin tablets or suspension. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for a list of the ingredients.tell your doctor if you are taking tizanidine (Zanaflex). Your doctor will probably tell you not to take ciprofloxacin while you are taking this medication.tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention the medications listed in the IMPORTANT WARNING section and any of the following: anticoagulants (‘blood thinners’) such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven); certain antidepressants; antipsychotics (medications to treat mental illness) such as clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo, Versacloz) and olanzapine (Zyprexa, in Symbax); azithromycin (Zithromax, Zmax); caffeine or medications that contain caffeine (Excedrin, NoDoz, Vivarin, others); clarithromycin (Biaxin, in Prevpac); cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune); diuretics (‘water pills’); duloxetine (Cymbalta); erythromycin (E.E.S., Eryc, Eryped, others); insulin or other medications to treat diabetes such as chlorpropamide, glimepiride (Amaryl, in Duetact), glipizide (Glucotrol), glyburide (DiaBeta), tolazamide, and tolbutamide; certain medications for irregular heartbeat such as amiodarone (Nexterone, Pacerone), disopyramide (Norpace), procainamide, quinidine (in Nuedexta), and sotalol (Betapace, Betapace AF, Sorine, Sotylize); methotrexate (Otrexup, Rasuvo, Trexall); certain nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) and naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, others); pentoxifylline (Pentoxil); phenytoin (Dilantin, Phenytek); probenecid (Probalan, in Col-Probenecid); ropinirole (Requip); sildenafil (Revatio, Viagra); theophylline (Elixophyllin, Theo-24, Uniphyl, others); tizanidine (Zanaflex); or zolpidem (Ambien, Edluar, Intermezzo, Zolpimist). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects. Many other medications may also interact with ciprofloxacin, so be sure to tell your doctor about all the medications you are taking, even those that do not appear on this list.if you are taking antacids containing calcium, aluminum hydroxide or magnesium hydroxide (Maalox, Mylanta, Tums, others); or certain medications such as didanosine (Videx) solution; calcium, iron, or zinc supplements; phosphate binders such as sevelamer (Renagel, Renvela) or lanthanum carbonate (Fosrenol); or sucralfate (Carafate), take ciprofloxacin at least 2 hours before or 6 hours after you take these medications.tell your doctor if you or anyone in your family has or has ever had a prolonged QT interval (a rare heart problem that may cause irregular heartbeat, fainting, or sudden death). Also, tell your doctor if you have or have ever had an irregular or slow heartbeat, heart failure (condition in which the heart is unable to pump enough blood to the other parts of the body), a heart attack, an aortic aneurysm (swelling of the large artery that carries blood from the heart to the body), high blood pressure, peripheral vascular disease (poor circulation in the blood vessels), Marfan syndrome (a genetic condition that can affect the heart, eyes, blood vessels and bones), Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (a genetic condition that can affect skin, joints, or blood vessels), or have a low level of potassium or magnesium in your blood. Also tell your doctor if you have or have ever had diabetes or problems with low blood sugar or liver disease.tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. If you become pregnant while taking ciprofloxacin, call your doctor.tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding. You should not breastfeed while you are taking ciprofloxacin and for at least 2 days after your final dose.do not drive a car, operate machinery or participate in activities requiring alertness or coordination until you know how this medication affects you.plan to avoid unnecessary or prolonged exposure to sunlight or ultraviolet light (tanning beds and sunlamps) and to wear protective clothing, sunglasses, and sunscreen. Ciprofloxacin may make your skin sensitive to sunlight or ultraviolet light. If your skin becomes reddened, swollen, or blistered, like a bad sunburn, call your doctor.

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Do not drink or eat a lot of caffeine-containing products such as coffee, tea, energy drinks, cola, or chocolate. Ciprofloxacin may increase nervousness, sleeplessness, heart pounding, and anxiety caused by caffeine. Make sure you drink plenty of water or other fluids every day while you are taking ciprofloxacin.

If you miss a dose of ciprofloxacin tablets or suspension and it is 6 hours or more before the next dose, take the missed dose as soon as you remember it and then take the next dose at the scheduled time. However, if you miss a dose of ciprofloxacin tablets or suspension and it is less than 6 hours before the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule.

If you miss a dose of the extended-release tablet and it is 8 hours or more before the next dose, take the dose as soon as you remember it and then take the next dose at the scheduled time. However, if you miss a dose of ciprofloxacin extended-release tablets and it is less than 8 hours before the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule.

Can I eat yogurt 3 hours after taking Cipro?

Do not take the liquid or tablets with dairy products (such as milk, cheese and yoghurt) or drinks with added calcium (such as some dairy-free milks). They stop ciprofloxacin entering the body from the stomach. Leave a gap of at least 2 hours between taking ciprofloxacin and having this type of food and drink.

Asked By: Xavier Adams Date: created: Nov 10 2023

How long should you wait to eat after taking Cipro

Answered By: Oscar James Date: created: Nov 13 2023

How should you take Ciprofloxacin? For best results, take it on an empty stomach. This means one hour before meals or two hours after.

Can I have dairy 2 hours after antibiotics?

What’s important to consider when taking antibiotics? – Antibiotics should be taken for as long as the doctor has prescribed them. Just because the symptoms of the illness subside, it doesn’t mean that all of the germs have been killed. Remaining bacteria may cause the illness to start up again.

  • If there are some tablets left over, they should not be kept for later use or given to other people.
  • Leftover medication can be disposed of in the normal garbage or dropped off at some pharmacies.
  • Pharmacies are not obligated to accept opened medicine though.
  • It is important not to dispose of the medication by pouring it down the drain or flushing it down the toilet.

That is bad for the environment and also contributes to bacterial resistance. Medications can only work properly if they are used correctly. It’s important to know the following things when taking antibiotics :

Can the tablets be broken into smaller pieces to make them easier to swallow? Doing this can stop some medications from working properly. What food can you take antibiotics with? Antibiotics are usually taken with water because taking them together with fruit juices, dairy products or alcohol can affect how the body absorbs some drugs. Dairy products include milk as well as butter, yogurt, and cheese. After taking an antibiotic you may need to wait for up to three hours before eating or drinking any dairy products. Grapefruit juice and dietary supplements containing minerals like calcium may also work dampen the effect of antibiotics. When should you take antibiotics ? Some antibiotics are always meant to be taken at the same time of day, others are meant to be taken before, with or after a meal. If you are supposed to take the medicine three times a day, for example, it usually needs to be taken at set times so that the effect is spread out evenly over the course of the day. You could remember the regular times of 6 a.m., 2 p.m. and 10 p.m. for an antibiotic that needs to be taken every 8 hours, for example. Can you take antibiotics together with other medications? Because antibiotics can interact with other medications, it’s important to tell your doctor if you take other medications too. Antibiotics might interact with some blood thinners and antacids, for example. Some antibiotics can make birth control pills less effective.

You can find detailed information on the use of a specific antibiotic in the package insert. If you’re not sure about what is important to consider when taking the antibiotic, you can ask your doctor or pharmacist.

How long does Cipro stay in your system?

How Do They Work? – Generally, antibiotics work to treat bacteria in two ways. Antibiotics called bactericidal agents cause bacterial cell death. Others called bacteriostatic agents stop bacteria growth and reproduction. For example, bactericidal antibiotics like penicillin and amoxicillin cause breakdown in bacterial cell walls.

  1. This leads to cell death.
  2. Antibiotics like erythromycin and clarithromycin primarily prevent bacteria from synthesizing protein, stopping their growth.
  3. Two Main Ways Antibiotics Work Bacteriostatic antibiotics prevent bacteria cell growth, and bactericidal antibiotics kill bacteria.
  4. Antibiotics start working right away after a person takes them.

Each antibiotic may stay in the body for different lengths of time, but common antibiotics such as amoxicillin and ciprofloxacin stay in your system for about 24 hours after taking the last dose. It might take longer for people with impaired kidney function to eliminate the drug from the body. How Long After Taking Cipro Can I Eat Dairy

What to avoid when taking ciprofloxacin 500mg?

There are 3 alcohol/food/lifestyle interactions with Cipro (ciprofloxacin). Using caffeine together with ciprofloxacin may increase the effects of caffeine. Contact your doctor if you experience headache, tremor, restlessness, nervousness, insomnia, and increased blood pressure or heart rate.

  • If your doctor does prescribe these medications together, you may need a dose adjustment or special test to safely use both medications.
  • It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs.
  • Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

Switch to professional interaction data Ciprofloxacin and multivitamin with minerals should not be taken orally at the same time. Products that contain magnesium, aluminum, calcium, iron, and/or other minerals may interfere with the absorption of ciprofloxacin into the bloodstream and reduce its effectiveness.

  1. If possible, it may be best to avoid taking multivitamin with minerals while you are being treated with ciprofloxacin.
  2. Otherwise, ciprofloxacin should be taken 2 to 4 hours before or 4 to 6 hours after a multivitamin with minerals dose, ciprofloxacin should be taken at least 2 hours before and not less than 6 hours after Suprep Bowel Prep (magnesium/potassium/sodium sulfates), or ciprofloxacin and multivitamin with minerals should be taken as directed by your healthcare provider.

Talk to your healthcare provider if you are unsure whether your medications contain something that could potentially interact or if you have questions on how to take this or other medications you are prescribed. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs.

  1. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.
  2. Switch to professional interaction data Do not take ciprofloxacin with dairy products such as milk or yogurt, or with calcium-fortified foods (e.G., cereal, juice).
  3. You may eat or drink dairy products or calcium-fortified foods with a regular meal, but do not use them alone when taking ciprofloxacin.

They could make the medication less effective. When ciprofloxacin tablets are given with enteral (tube) feedings, ciprofloxacin may not work as well. You could interrupt the feeding for 1 hour before and 2 hours after the ciprofloxacin dose, or your doctor may decide to switch to a different treatment.

Is it a must to take ciprofloxacin with food?

How to take or use it – You can take ciprofloxacin tablets and liquid with or without food. However, avoid dairy products like milk, cheese and yoghurt, as they can affect how your medicine works.

Is Cipro hard on your stomach?

Precautions – Drug information provided by: Merative, Micromedex ® It is very important that your doctor check your or your child’s progress while you are using this medicine. This will allow your doctor to see if the medicine is working properly and to decide if you should continue to use it.

Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. If your or your child’s symptoms do not improve within a few days, or if they become worse, check with your doctor. Do not use this medicine if you are also taking tizanidine (Zanaflex®). Tell your doctor if you or your child are also using theophylline (Theo-Dur®) or other products that contain caffeine (eg, coffee, soda, chocolate).

Using these medicines together may increase the risk for more serious side effects. Ciprofloxacin may rarely cause inflammation (tendinitis) or tearing of a tendon (the cord that attaches muscles to bones). This can occur while you are taking the medicine or after you finish taking it.

The risk of having tendon problems may be increased if you are over 60 years of age, are using steroid medicines (eg, dexamethasone, prednisolone, prednisone, Medrol®), have severe kidney problems, have a history of tendon problems (eg, rheumatoid arthritis), or if you have received an organ transplant (eg, heart, kidney, or lung).

Check with your doctor right away if you have sudden pain or swelling in a tendon after exercise (eg, ankle, back of the knee or leg, shoulder, elbow, or wrist), bruise more easily after an injury, or are unable to bear weight or move the affected area.

  1. Refrain from exercise until your doctor says otherwise.
  2. Tell your doctor right away if you have feeling anxious, confused, or depressed, seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not there, seizures, severe headache, trouble sleeping, or unusual thoughts or behaviors.
  3. These may be symptoms of serious mental problems.

This medicine may cause serious allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis, which can be life-threatening and require immediate medical attention. Call your doctor right away if you or your child have a rash, itching, hives, hoarseness, trouble or swallowing, or any swelling of your hands, face, mouth, or throat after you take this medicine.

Serious side effects can occur during treatment with this medicine and can sometimes occur without warning. However, possible warning signs include: black, tarry stools, blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin, bloody or cloudy urine, chills, decreased urination, diarrhea, fever, joint or muscle pain, red skin lesions, often with a purple center, sores, ulcers, or white spots in the mouth or on the lips, severe stomach pain, skin rash, swelling of the face, fingers, feet, or lower legs, unusual bleeding or bruising, unusual weight gain, or yellow skin or eyes.

Check with your doctor immediately if you or your child notice any of these warning signs. Check with your doctor right away if you have dark urine, clay-colored stools, stomach pain, or yellow eyes or skin. These maybe symptoms of a serious liver problem.

  • Ciprofloxacin may lower the number of some types of blood cells in your body.
  • Because of this, you may bleed or get infections more easily.
  • To help with these problems, avoid being near people who are sick or have infections.
  • Wash your hands often.
  • Stay away from rough sports or other situations where you could be bruised, cut, or injured.

Brush and floss your teeth gently. Be careful when using sharp objects, including razors and fingernail clippers. Ciprofloxacin may cause diarrhea, and in some cases it can be severe. It may occur 2 months or more after you or your child stop taking this medicine.

Do not take any medicine to treat diarrhea without first checking with your doctor. Diarrhea medicines may make the diarrhea worse or make it last longer. If you have any questions about this or if mild diarrhea continues or gets worse, check with your doctor. Check with your doctor right away if you or your child start having numbness, tingling, or burning pain in your hands, arms, legs, or feet.

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These may be symptoms of a condition called peripheral neuropathy. This medicine may increase your risk for aortic aneurysm (bulge in the wall of the largest artery). Check with your doctor right away if you have sudden chest, stomach, or back pain, trouble breathing, cough, or hoarseness.

Stay out of direct sunlight, especially between the hours of 10:00 AM and 3:00 PM, if possible. Wear protective clothing, including a hat and sunglasses. Apply a sun block product that has a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15. Some people may require a product with a higher SPF number, especially if they have a fair complexion. If you have any questions about this, check with your doctor. Do not use a sun lamp or tanning bed or booth.

If you have a severe reaction from the sun, check with your doctor. Ciprofloxacin may cause some people to become dizzy, lightheaded, drowsy, or less alert than they are normally. Do not drive or do anything else that could be dangerous until you know how this medicine affects you.

  • If these reactions are especially bothersome, check with your doctor.
  • If you are a diabetic patient taking diabetes medicine by mouth: Ciprofloxacin may cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) in some patients.
  • Symptoms of low blood sugar must be treated before they lead to unconsciousness (passing out).

Different people may feel different symptoms of low blood sugar. If you experience symptoms of low blood sugar, check with your doctor right away.

Symptoms of low blood sugar can include: anxiety, behavior change similar to being drunk, blurred vision, cold sweats, confusion, cool pale skin, difficulty with concentrating, drowsiness, excessive hunger, headache, nausea, nervousness, rapid heartbeat, shakiness, or unusual tiredness or weakness.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter ) medicines and herbal or vitamin supplements.

Should I take a probiotic with Cipro?

Should You Take Probiotic Supplements While Taking Antibiotics? March 19,2019 How Long After Taking Cipro Can I Eat Dairy Antibiotics are an important class of drugs that are prescribed by healthcare providers to treat harmful bacterial infections in the body. However, they have not been proven useful for treating illnesses like the common cold or flu, which are viral infections.

  • Moreover, current research suggests that antibiotics may have been over-prescribed in recent years as a preventative medication to reduce the risk of secondary infections.
  • Since antibiotics kill all kinds of bacteria, including helpful gut bacteria, side effects of antibiotic use often include stomach upset, diarrhea, or thrush.

Probiotics are often called “the good” bacteria because, along with yeasts, they help keep your gut healthy. Probiotics help food pass through your digestive system by affecting the nerves that cause gut movement. Researchers are still actively trying to figure out how probiotics work but doctors often suggest taking probiotics to help with antibiotic-related diarrhea, such as clostridium difficile infection (C.DIFF) commonly associated with taking fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin or Cipro.

Avoid Alcohol – Alcohol can disrupt gut microbiome and negatively affect your body’s efforts to fight infection. Avoid Sugary Foods – Foods with added sugars as well as overly processed foods may feed bad bacteria and fuel the overgrowth of yeasts. Take All Prescribed Antibiotics – Always follow your doctor’s advice and never finish a course of antibiotics early. Eat Prebiotic Foods – Prebiotic foods are a type of fiber that the human body cannot digest that feed probiotics, such as chicory root, Jerusalem artichoke, garlic or asparagus. Eat Fermented Foods – Eating probiotic rich foods like kombucha, yogurt, kimchi, kefir or sauerkraut can prevent negative side effects of antibiotics. Don’t Rely Solely on Antibiotics – Eat healthy and add immune-boosting foods containing Vitamin C and other antioxidants. Also, get plenty of sleep when fighting an infection.

Antibiotics can cause negative shifts (dysbiosis) in your gut bacteria, digestive upset, or even painful infections like C.DIFF. Should you experience intestinal discomfort discuss this with your doctor rather than launch a trial and error campaign to balance your gut microbiota.

  • New Research on Side Effects of Taking Probiotics Recently, the prestigious medical journal published a couple of groundbreaking studies on the safety and utility of probiotic supplementation to restore bacterial balance in the gut.
  • Ironically, for some people, taking probiotics after antibiotics prevented their gut from returning to normal and extended gut dysbiosis for up to five months after stopping medication.

On the other hand, natural restoration of gut microbiome relying on food intake typically occurred within three weeks of ending medications. Probiotics are not a proven replacement for a nutrient-dense diet, and diet is still the primary determinant of microbiota composition.

In fact, the benefits of taking probiotics, during or immediately after antibiotics in most cases, do not appear to outweigh the long-term delay in restoring gut microbiota. Nonetheless, it is unlikely there will ever be a definitive answer as every “body” is different and numerous variables must be considered in directing the best course of medical actions for a given individual.

It is probably safe to say that taking your antibiotics exactly as directed and allowing your gut to recover on its own by supporting it with a nutrient-dense diet is the best course of action for most patients. To discuss your specific medical needs with a board-certified physician, contact PrimeMED to schedule an appointment at our Orange Park, St.

Is Cipro a strong antibiotic?

4. Bottom Line – Ciprofloxacin is an effective antibiotic that treats a wide variety of infections; however, it should not be given to children aged less than 18 and in adults, it should be reserved for infections that are not treated by other antibiotics. Severe side effects include tendinitis and tendon rupture.

Asked By: Jake Russell Date: created: Jun 18 2023

Does vitamin D interact with Cipro

Answered By: Douglas Morris Date: created: Jun 21 2023

Discussion – In this study, we revealed that the antimicrobial effect of fluoroquinolones, namely, ciprofloxacin was inhibited when bacteria were pretreated with vitamin D. Results obtained in this study were based upon using various strains of reference bacteria.

  • These results could be of importance for patients receiving vitamin D while taking ciprofloxacin for bacterial infections.
  • Results obtained in the current study showed that ciprofloxacin possess an antimicrobial activity against a wide panel of bacterial strain including E.coli, S.
  • Aureus, P.
  • Aeruginosa, S.

epidermidis, A. baumannii, and P. mirabilis, These results are in accordance with many previous studies that have shown susceptibility of these bacterial strains to ciprofloxacin.5, 21 Moreover, the formation of reactive oxygen species inside the bacteria has been suggested as one of the mechanisms through which ciprofloxacin exerts its antimicrobial effect, 12, 20, 21 as several studies revealed protection of the bacteria from the antimicrobial effect of ciprofloxacin when these bacteria are pretreated with antioxidants, namely, vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin B12, tempol, melatonin and pentoxifylline.21, 22, 26 In concordance, current results showed that the cytotoxicity of ciprofloxacin against bacterial cells was associated with a time-dependent ROS generation.

This generation of ROS was attenuated via treatment of bacterial cells with vitamin D, which possesses well documented antioxidant activity.27, 28 In the current study, combining ciprofloxacin with vitamin D resulted in inhibiting the antibacterial activity of ciprofloxacin against the reference bacterial strains.

To our knowledge, this is the first study to report such effect. These results could reveal that the concomitant administration of vitamin D and ciprofloxacin might negatively affect the therapeutic potential of ciprofloxacin through possibly, interfering with one of its antibacterial mechanisms.

  1. The exact mechanism of this interaction between ciprofloxacin and vitamin D is not fully known.
  2. Fluoroquinolones, including ciprofloxacin, exert their bactericidal effect through mainly, interfering with bacterial DNA gyrase, type II topoisomerase, 29 leading to excess production of ROS in the bacterial cells and eventually, cell death.30, 31 The results of the current study further emphasize the role of ROS in the antimicrobial effect of ciprofloxacin.

Furthermore, results of this study revealed the high sensitivity of E.coli against ciprofloxacin, compared to other bacterial species tested such as A. baumannii and K. pneumoniae, which have low to intermediate sensitivity. This was manifested by the significantly smaller diameters of zone of inhibition of ciprofloxacin for A.

baumannii and K. pneumoniae compared to large zones of inhibition against E.coli, This higher sensitivity of E. coli could be due to the abundance of outer membrane proteins –porins – as compared to other investigated bacterial strain in the current study. Porins were shown to be related to increased sensitivity to E.

coli,32 In correlation with this, the MIC values for A. baumannii, for example, was several folds higher than those for E.coli, To this end, the possibility of this interaction between ciprofloxacin and vitamin D exists, future studies are still needed for better understanding of the exact mechanisms of this interaction.

In this study, the possible reducing effect for vitamin D on the antimicrobial activity of ciprofloxacin was assessed based only on few parameters (the zones of inhibition, MIC values, and ROS generation). Our future studies will use other several parameters for better understanding of this possible interaction.

In this study, we used limited number of bacterial strains. Our future studies will be directed toward the use of more standard bacterial strains. In vivo studies concerned with the effect of this combination in patients receiving this combination are also warranted.

Is almond milk OK with Cipro?

Effects of Calcium on Antibiotics and Other Medications – Probably one of the classic food–drug interactions is that of calcium and its impact on drug absorption ( Table 28.1 ). Calcium supplements and calcium-rich foods such as dairy products, soy milk, almond milk, and tofu, and even milk added to tea or coffee may significantly reduce the absorption of several antibiotics including tetracycline, minocycline, doxycycline, levofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin ( Jung et al., 1997 ).

  • A reduction in the absorption of antibiotics will reduce the therapeutic effects of these drugs and may lead to more serious or recurring infections owing to subtherapeutic concentrations of the drugs in the blood.
  • To improve their absorption, these medications should be taken at least 1 h before or 2 h after calcium, magnesium, and iron supplements or dairy products.

Table 28.1, Effects of Caffeine, Dairy Calcium, Foods, Garlic, Tyramine, and Vitamin K–Rich Foods on Drug Effects a

Food Interaction Drug References
Caffeine Lithium Corti and Taegtmeyer (2012), de Boer et al. (2015), Fasinu et al. (2016), and Carrillo and Benitez (2000)
Caffeine Theophylline Corti and Taegtmeyer (2012) and Carrillo and Benitez (2000)
Caffeine, tyramine Linezolid Corti and Taegtmeyer (2012), de Boer et al. (2015), Fasinu et al. (2016), Carrillo and Benitez (2000), and Leone et al. (2004)
Caffeine Clozapine Corti and Taegtmeyer (2012), de Boer et al. (2015), Fasinu et al. (2016), and Carrillo and Benitez (2000)
Dairy, Ca, Mg, Fe Ciprofloxacin Jung et al. (1997)
Dairy, Ca, Mg, Fe Doxycycline Jung et al. (1997)
Dairy, Ca, Mg, Fe Levofloxacin Jung et al. (1997)
Dairy, Ca, Mg, Fe Minocycline Jung et al. (1997)
Dairy, Ca, Mg, Fe Tetracycline Jung et al. (1997)
Food Thyroid hormone de Boer et al. (2015) and Leone et al. (2004)
Food Fe supplements de Boer et al. (2015) and Leone et al. (2004)
Garlic Saquinavir Berginc and Kristl (2013), Piscitelli et al. (2002), and de Boer et al. (2015)
Tyramine Phenelzine Corti and Taegtmeyer (2012)
Tyramine Isocarboxazid de Boer et al. (2015) and Carrillo and Benitez (2000)
Tyramine Isoniazid Corti and Taegtmeyer (2012)
Tyramine Tranylcypromine de Boer et al. (2015) and Leone et al. (2004)
Vitamin K–rich foods Warfarin Ge et al. (2014), Berginc and Kristl (2013), Corti and Taegtmeyer (2012), de Boer et al. (2015), and Fasinu et al. (2016)
Garlic
Cranberry
Green tea
Soy
Ginge

AE, adverse effects; DE, drug effects. a This list is not meant to be exhaustive, but merely highlights some of the main foods and beverages that may result in a clinically significant interaction with particular drugs ( Chin et al., 1995 ). Read full chapter URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780128054130000284

Is 3 days of Cipro enough for UTI?

Dosing – The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor’s orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

For oral dosage form (extended-release tablets):

For acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis:

Adults—1000 milligrams (mg) once a day. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For complicated urinary tract infections:

Adults—1000 milligrams (mg) once a day. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For uncomplicated urinary tract infections (acute cystitis):

Adults—500 milligrams (mg) once a day for 3 days. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For oral dosage forms (suspension or tablets):

For anthrax infection (post-exposure):

Adults—500 milligrams (mg) 2 times a day, taken every 12 hours for 60 days. Children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The dose is usually 15 milligram (mg) per kilogram (kg) of body weight every 12 hours for 60 days. However, the dose is usually not more than 500 mg per day.

For gonorrhea:

Adults—250 milligrams (mg) taken as a single dose. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For other infections:

Adults—250 to 750 milligrams (mg) 2 times a day, taken every 12 hours. Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

For plague:

Adults—500 to 750 milligrams (mg) 2 times a day, taken every 12 hours for 14 days. Children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The dose is usually 15 milligram (mg) per kilogram (kg) of body weight every 8 to 12 hours for 14 days. However, the dose is usually not more than 500 mg per day.

For urinary tract or serious kidney infections:

Adults—250 to 500 milligrams (mg) 2 times a day, taken every 12 hours for 7 to 14 days. Children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The dose is usually 10 to 20 milligrams (mg) per kilogram (kg) of body weight every 12 hours for 10 to 21 days. However, the dose is usually not more than 750 mg per day.

How much water should I drink with ciprofloxacin?

Instructions – Drink the medicine. Do not bite the little capsules in the liquid. This medicine may be taken with or without food. Swallow with a full glass (8 oz) of water unless your doctor gives you different instructions. Keep the medicine at room temperature.

  • Avoid heat and direct light.
  • Shake the medicine vigorously for 15 seconds before using.
  • Drink extra water while on this medicine.
  • Adults should try to drink 6-8 cups (48 to 64 oz.) of water every day.
  • Avoid drinks with caffeine while on this medicine.
  • Do not take this medicine with milk or milk products (such as yogurt).

Do not take this medicine with antacids. Do not take any antacids or vitamins with magnesium, calcium, aluminum, iron, or zinc for 6 hours before or 2 hours after taking this medicine. After using the medicine for the total number of days, throw away any leftover medicine.

  • This medicine may cause you to become more sensitive to the sun.
  • Use sunscreen or wear protective clothing when you are exposed to the sun.
  • It is important that you keep taking each dose of this medicine on time even if you are feeling well.
  • If you forget to take a dose on time, take it as soon as you remember.

If it is less than 6 hours to the next dose, do not take the missed dose. Return to your normal dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses of this medicine at one time. Please tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the medicines you take. Include both prescription and over-the-counter medicines.

Why can’t you take Cipro with yogurt?

Abstract – The effects of milk and yogurt on the bioavailability of ciprofloxacin were studied in seven healthy volunteers in a randomized crossover trial. After an overnight fast, 500 mg ciprofloxacin was given with 300 ml water, milk, or yogurt. Plasma ciprofloxacin concentrations were significantly (p less than 0.05) lower during the milk and yogurt phases from 1/2 to 10 hours; at 1/2 hour the concentration was reduced by 70% by milk and by 92% by yogurt.

  • Milk reduced the peak plasma concentration by 36% (p less than 0.05) and yogurt by 47% (p less than 0.05).
  • The extent of bioavailability, measured as the total area under the plasma concentration-time curve and 24-hour urinary excretion of ciprofloxacin, was reduced by 30% to 36% by milk and yogurt (p less than 0.05).

We conclude that the absorption of ciprofloxacin can be reduced by concomitant ingestion of milk or yogurt. To avoid therapeutic failures in infections where the causative organism is only moderately susceptible, ingestion of large amounts of dairy products in liquid form with ciprofloxacin is not recommended.

How many days should I take ciprofloxacin 500mg?

Dosing – The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor’s orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

  • For oral dosage form (extended-release tablets):
    • For acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis:
      • Adults—1000 milligrams (mg) once a day.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For complicated urinary tract infections:
      • Adults—1000 milligrams (mg) once a day.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For uncomplicated urinary tract infections (acute cystitis):
      • Adults—500 milligrams (mg) once a day for 3 days.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For oral dosage forms (suspension or tablets):
    • For anthrax infection (post-exposure):
      • Adults—500 milligrams (mg) 2 times a day, taken every 12 hours for 60 days.
      • Children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The dose is usually 15 milligram (mg) per kilogram (kg) of body weight every 12 hours for 60 days. However, the dose is usually not more than 500 mg per day.
    • For gonorrhea:
      • Adults—250 milligrams (mg) taken as a single dose.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For other infections:
      • Adults—250 to 750 milligrams (mg) 2 times a day, taken every 12 hours.
      • Children—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • For plague:
      • Adults—500 to 750 milligrams (mg) 2 times a day, taken every 12 hours for 14 days.
      • Children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The dose is usually 15 milligram (mg) per kilogram (kg) of body weight every 8 to 12 hours for 14 days. However, the dose is usually not more than 500 mg per day.
    • For urinary tract or serious kidney infections:
      • Adults—250 to 500 milligrams (mg) 2 times a day, taken every 12 hours for 7 to 14 days.
      • Children—Dose is based on body weight and must be determined by your doctor. The dose is usually 10 to 20 milligrams (mg) per kilogram (kg) of body weight every 12 hours for 10 to 21 days. However, the dose is usually not more than 750 mg per day.

How long after Cipro can you drink alcohol?

What to do – The warning label on your antibiotic should include information about alcohol use. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you’re unsure about the details of your medications. They may tell you that an occasional drink is OK. But that likely depends on your age, overall health, and the type of drug you’re taking.

How long should you wait to eat yogurt after taking an antibiotic?

What’s important to consider when taking antibiotics? – Antibiotics should be taken for as long as the doctor has prescribed them. Just because the symptoms of the illness subside, it doesn’t mean that all of the germs have been killed. Remaining bacteria may cause the illness to start up again.

  1. If there are some tablets left over, they should not be kept for later use or given to other people.
  2. Leftover medication can be disposed of in the normal garbage or dropped off at some pharmacies.
  3. Pharmacies are not obligated to accept opened medicine though.
  4. It is important not to dispose of the medication by pouring it down the drain or flushing it down the toilet.

That is bad for the environment and also contributes to bacterial resistance. Medications can only work properly if they are used correctly. It’s important to know the following things when taking antibiotics :

Can the tablets be broken into smaller pieces to make them easier to swallow? Doing this can stop some medications from working properly. What food can you take antibiotics with? Antibiotics are usually taken with water because taking them together with fruit juices, dairy products or alcohol can affect how the body absorbs some drugs. Dairy products include milk as well as butter, yogurt, and cheese. After taking an antibiotic you may need to wait for up to three hours before eating or drinking any dairy products. Grapefruit juice and dietary supplements containing minerals like calcium may also work dampen the effect of antibiotics. When should you take antibiotics ? Some antibiotics are always meant to be taken at the same time of day, others are meant to be taken before, with or after a meal. If you are supposed to take the medicine three times a day, for example, it usually needs to be taken at set times so that the effect is spread out evenly over the course of the day. You could remember the regular times of 6 a.m., 2 p.m. and 10 p.m. for an antibiotic that needs to be taken every 8 hours, for example. Can you take antibiotics together with other medications? Because antibiotics can interact with other medications, it’s important to tell your doctor if you take other medications too. Antibiotics might interact with some blood thinners and antacids, for example. Some antibiotics can make birth control pills less effective.

You can find detailed information on the use of a specific antibiotic in the package insert. If you’re not sure about what is important to consider when taking the antibiotic, you can ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Asked By: Patrick Collins Date: created: Feb 06 2023

How long should you wait to take an antibiotic after eating yogurt

Answered By: Isaac Cooper Date: created: Feb 09 2023

Some researchers recommend taking 240 mL (8 ounces) of other yogurt preparations twice daily. Take yogurt at least 2 hours before or 2 hours after antibiotics.

How many hours does Cipro stay in your system?

How Do They Work? – Generally, antibiotics work to treat bacteria in two ways. Antibiotics called bactericidal agents cause bacterial cell death. Others called bacteriostatic agents stop bacteria growth and reproduction. For example, bactericidal antibiotics like penicillin and amoxicillin cause breakdown in bacterial cell walls.

  1. This leads to cell death.
  2. Antibiotics like erythromycin and clarithromycin primarily prevent bacteria from synthesizing protein, stopping their growth.
  3. Two Main Ways Antibiotics Work Bacteriostatic antibiotics prevent bacteria cell growth, and bactericidal antibiotics kill bacteria.
  4. Antibiotics start working right away after a person takes them.

Each antibiotic may stay in the body for different lengths of time, but common antibiotics such as amoxicillin and ciprofloxacin stay in your system for about 24 hours after taking the last dose. It might take longer for people with impaired kidney function to eliminate the drug from the body. How Long After Taking Cipro Can I Eat Dairy

Can I eat yogurt 2 hours after taking doxycycline?

How to take it – If you’re taking a lower dose of 40mg of doxycycline a day for rosacea or gum infections, take it at least 1 hour before food. If you’re taking a higher dose of 100mg or more for other types of infection, you can take it with or without food.

  • But you’re less likely to feel sick if you have it with food.
  • Do not take your medicine together with dairy products.
  • This is because dairy foods like milk, cheese and yoghurt can stop your body from absorbing doxycycline.
  • You can have dairy products a few hours before or after your dose.
  • It’s important to take doxycycline while you’re in an upright position.

You can be sitting, standing or walking. This will stop the medicine irritating your food pipe or stomach. Avoid lying down for at least 30 minutes after taking doxycycline. If you take it twice a day, this could be first thing in the morning, and in the evening – before you go to bed.