Asked By: Hunter Perez Date: created: Mar 12 2023

Do I have to wait 4 hours between pool chemicals

Answered By: Miguel Walker Date: created: Mar 15 2023

Swimming After Adding Pool Chemicals: How Long to Wait? You may have asked at some point, “How soon can you swim after adding chlorine?” or “How long do I need to wait between adding pool chemicals?” No matter which type of pool chemical you’re dealing with, it’s always recommended to carefully read and follow the instructions listed on the product label.

This label will include helpful safety and handling information, including recommended wait times before jumping back in the pool to swim. In general, the following recommendations apply to most swimming pools: After Adding pH, Alkalinity and Clarifier It is recommended to wait at least 20 minutes to an hour after adding water balancing chemicals.

After Adding Calcium Chloride to Raise Calcium Hardness You should wait 2–4 hours (or one full cycle through the filter) to swim from the moment you use calcium chloride in your pool. After Shocking Your Pool It is safe to swim once your chlorine levels are around 5 ppm or after 24 hours.

  • It is always best to test first! After Adding Muriatic Acid Muriatic acid can create a hot spot of acid in the water that could potentially burn or irritate your skin.
  • It is best to wait 30 minutes after adding it to your pool.
  • After Adding Algaecide We recommend waiting at least 15 minutes to swim after adding algaecide to your swimming pool.

Most algaecides are perfectly safe to swim with. After Adding Floc It is not recommended to swim with flocculent in your pool, as it will reduce its effectiveness. Swim only after the floc has settled to the bottom of the pool and been vacuumed to waste.

What pool chemicals Cannot be added at the same time?

Chlorine & Acid – Perhaps most important of all — NEVER add chlorine and muriatic acid or Dry Acid together, whether outside the pool or in it. This creates a dangerous toxic gas that can have severe health consequences if inhaled. Don’t ever shock the pool immediately after adding acid to the water.

Can I swim 4 hours after shocking pool?

Can you swim in the pool after you shock a pool? – You need to wait for at least 8 hours and up to 24 hours after using a chlorine-based shock before you can swim. And you’ll want to retest your water to make sure your chemical levels are within range.

Can you add pool chemicals during the day?

Best Time to Shock Your Pool – The best time of day to shock pool is when the sun is down. So, experts recommend shocking your pool in the evening or at night, to make sure it does its job. Shocking during the day can be ineffective as UV rays from direct sunlight significantly reduce free chlorine levels.

What is the golden rule when using pool water chemicals?

Chemical Adjustment – Chemical manufacturers typically provide recommended dosages, depending on the size of the pool. The simplest strategy is to follow them, remembering the two golden rules of adding chemicals: only add chemicals to a pool that is running, and only add chemicals to water, not water to chemicals.

  • NOTE: Use leftover chemicals from the previous year before newly purchased ones, but be aware that over time they may have lost some of their punch.
  • Carefully open these older chemicals outdoors, keeping your face clear of the openings to avoid a blast of harmful substance into the eyes and nose.
  • Be careful of your pool’s liner (or colored plaster).

Chemicals can easily discolor these, so never allow direct contact between them and the chemicals. Add the recommended chemicals bit by bit, in small amounts, with the filter running. This is to ensure an even distribution and dilution of chemicals so that subsequent water tests are accurate.

  • Dumping all the chemicals in one spot and then testing the water will skew the results and leave you helpless to proceed (or cause you to proceed incorrectly).
  • A few key points concerning specific chemicals: The first concerns copper-based algaecide.
  • Again in the interest of protecting the liner or plaster, be sure that pH levels are in balance BEFORE using such algaecide, as a subsequent rapid change in pH can throw copper out of suspension and stain surfaces.

Also, you’ll probably need to shock. As always, add chemicals to water. Fill a bucket, then add granular shock gradually, mixing well. Pour the mixture around the edge of the pool with the pump running.

Asked By: Steven Johnson Date: created: Jan 07 2024

Do you add all pool chemicals at once

Answered By: Wyatt Evans Date: created: Jan 10 2024

The Orderly Addition of Chemicals Chemicals that affect the levels of pH and alkalinity need to be added to the swimming pool first. Getting the pH and total alkalinity sorted out will allow for the addition of further chemicals that affect the hardness and cleanliness of the water.

Can I swim 1 hour after shocking pool?

This Is How Long You Should Wait Before Swimming in a Newly Opened Pool On a hot day, there’s nothing quite as tempting as a cool swimming pool. A pool that hasn’t been used for a while, however, needs to be prepped, or “shocked,” before you can jump in and splash around or do laps.

  1. Shocking is crucial for removing any and making a pool safe for swimming, but it involves using some heavy-duty chemicals, including,
  2. Going in too soon after a pool’s been shocked can potentially cause skin, eye, and even lung problems.
  3. It’s tough to wait to take a dip, but it’s not worth messing with your health.

Here’s what to know before you take the plunge. Getty Images If you’ve owned or maintained a pool, you’ve probably heard the term. Shocking is “the process of adding chemicals to the pool to make water composition ideal for chlorine or non-chlorine alternatives to work best,”, an associate professor of pharmacology and toxicology at Michigan State, told Health,

The goal of shocking the pool is to raise the level of “free chlorine” in the pool to a point where things like algae and are destroyed. (Free chlorine is chlorine that hasn’t yet neutralized harmful gunk in the pool.) There is a range of chemicals that can be used for a pool shock, including calcium hypochlorite and chlorinated isocyanurates like trichloroisocyanuric acid or potassium dichloroisocyanurate.

In general, it’s recommended that you wait up to 24 hours to get into a pool after it’s been shocked, depending on the size of the pool, Alan said. If you’re overseeing the pool maintenance, Alan said it’s also a good idea to test the water’s pH and chlorine to make sure they’re in the right range before you or anyone else gets in the pool.

  1. A good chlorine level is between 1.0 and 4.0 parts per million, and the pH should be between 7.2 and 7.8, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  2. There are a few potential issues.
  3. Chlorine will react with water to produce an acid,” Alan said.
  4. The effects will be different depending on whether chlorine is inhaled or whether there is skin or eye contact.” At a minimum, “you would definitely get,”, assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, told Health,

And, if you happen to have a skin condition like or, Dr. Goldenberg said this could cause a flare. You may even deal with symptoms like burning, redness, pain, and blisters, Alan added. The water can also impact your eyes and lungs. “Eye effects would include pain, redness, blurred vision, and watery eyes,” Alan said.

  1. The inhalation effects are typically the most severe and include shortness of breath, chest tightness, wheezing, and fluid in the lungs.” And, if you happen to accidentally drink some pool water, you could end up feeling and even throw up.
  2. Luckily, Alan said, “the effects are typically reversible.” If you hop into a pool too soon after it’s been shocked and you start to notice symptoms, Alan said it’s important to get out ASAP and get to fresh air (i.e., away from the pool).
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“Remove all exposed clothing and wash all the affected areas thoroughly with soap and water,” Alan said. If you wear contacts, she also recommended taking them out and “thoroughly” rinsing your eyes with saline solution. If your skin feels uncomfortable after you’ve cleaned off, Dr. Thanks for your feedback! : This Is How Long You Should Wait Before Swimming in a Newly Opened Pool

Asked By: Gavin Ward Date: created: Jul 20 2023

Is shock the same as chlorine

Answered By: Austin Reed Date: created: Jul 20 2023

What is the difference between chlorine and shock? Do I need to use both? I think I have algae. What do I do? My pool is cloudy. How do I clear it up? My water is green and does not improve with shock. How do I restore the water clarity? I have white powder at the bottom of my pool. What is it? Why do I need all these chemicals? My pool is stained. How do I clean it? How long after adding chemicals can I swim? How often should I run my filter? When should I clean or backwash it?

Chlorine is a sanitizer, and (unless you use Baquacil products) is necessary for maintaining a clear and healthy pool. Shock is chlorine, in a high dose, meant to shock your pool and raise the chlorine level quickly. Chlorine tabs (placed in a chlorinator, floater, or skimmer basket) maintain a chlorine residual in the water. You do need to use both tabs and shock. Without tabs, the chlorine shock will dissipate quickly out of the water; without shock, the chlorine level will not get high enough to fully sanitize the water. You should aim to keep the chlorine level at between 1 and 3 ppm. We suggest shocking the pool every week to two weeks; with hot weather or increased use, you may need to shock more often. When tabs run out, replace them. Algae is typically a green growth, though it may also be mustard, black, or red. Sometimes it resembles a stain along the walls or floor; if you can brush it off, it is algae. If you can’t brush it off, it is probably a stain (see question 7). You cannot test for algae — if you see it in the water, or feel a slime along the liner, then you have it. Add a dose of algaecide, bring your chlorine level high by shocking, and run the filter continuously until the problem clears. The next day you should vacuum up the dead algae and backwash your filter. Algae thrives in hot weather and in pools with low or no chlorine. Be dutiful in shocking every week to two weeks and add a maintenance dose of algaecide every other week to prevent further algae growth. Water clarity issues typically stem from one of two causes: water imbalance or filtering problems. When your pool is cloudy, first check to see if it’s balanced properly. The easiest way is to bring a water sample to Splash Pool Supply. We will analyze your water within a couple minutes and set you up with any needed chemicals. You may also use test strips or a test kit at home. Common causes for cloudy water are low chlorine or low alkalinity levels. If the water is balanced, you could try a clarifier or flocculent; these products coagulate the particles in your water and drop them to the bottom so they can be vacuumed up. Run your filter until the water clears. If treating the water does not solve the problem, you may have a filtering issue. Backwash your sand or DE filter; rinse the cartridge of your cartridge filter. If you have a sand filter, make sure to change the sand every 3 to 5 years. If you have a DE filter, try rinsing the fingers or grids with a filter solution and changing the DE powder. If these tips still do not clear the water, you may have a metal problem (see question 4). The best thing to do is bring a water sample into the store and talk to a trained employee. Once you’ve ruled out algae (see question 2), It’s time to think about metals. If the water is lime green, does not improve with shock, or gets worse after shocking, you may have metals in your water. The most common metals around here are copper and iron, especially common in well water. Chlorine oxidizes the metals, turning the water green, and sometimes staining the pool walls and floor. Bring a water sample to Splash Pool Supply and ask to be tested for metals. If they are present in your water, we will set you up with a product to remove them. You should also refrain from further shocking until the metal problem is resolved. One possibility is that chemicals added incorrectly are sitting at the bottom of your pool. Did you remember to pre-mix the calcium balance in a pail of water? Did you add the water stabilizer through the skimmer? If not, these chemicals may not have dissolved correctly. If you have a DE filter, however, it is likely that there is a tear in one of the fingers or grids inside the filter tank. DE powder escapes through these tears and is blown back into the pool. Remove the lid of the tank, wash off the fingers or grids, and carefully check for tears. You may need to replace a grid section, a few fingers, or even the whole tank. You may also have a crack or loose screws in the faceplate of the filter. Alkalinity helps to stabilize the pH; when the alkalinity is in range, the pH will fluctuate less. Low alkalinity will also cause hazy water. Alkalinity levels decrease with the acid rain; it is important to add Alkalinity Balance periodically throughout the summer to maintain a level between 100 and 150 ppm. A low pH means that your pool is acidic. Acidic water can corrode metal fittings, filter systems, and especially heaters. The pH goes down with rain, so it is important to add pH Up periodically to maintain a level between 7.2 and 7.8. A pH that is too high or too low can also irritate your eyes. If your pH is too high, you may need to add some pH down. Calcium Balance softens the water. Here in Connecticut, we tend to have rather hard water, so it is normal to need a good deal of Calcium Balance at the beginning of the season and after additions of fresh water to your pool. A proper level of calcium protects your liner and equipment from the harshness of the chemicals. If you own an inground gunite pool, adding calcium is essential; if the water is too hard, it will take minerals from the wall, thus deteriorating the walls and the paint. Calcium is also important to the clarity of your water. Water Stabilizer acts as a sunblock for your pool, helping to hold chlorine in the water. Without a high enough stabilizer (cyanuric acid) level, the chlorine that you add to the water will quickly be sucked out by the sun. Add about 2 lbs. of stabilizer per 5,000 gallons of pool water. To add, pour stabilizer very slowly through your skimmer while the pump is running. Do not backwash the filter for 5 days; if you need to vacuum or backwash, do that first. The stabilizer will dissolve under pressure in your filter. Usually you will need to add another small dose of stabilizer towards the end of July. Shock is liquid or granular chlorine. You should add one gallon (or one pound) of shock per 10,000 gallons of pool water every week to two weeks. During hot weather or frequent use, you may need to shock more frequently. Low chlorine levels often cause green or hazy water, so if your water looks a little cloudy and you haven’t shocked in a while, adding shock is the first step. It is always best to shock the pool in the evening, when the sun if off the water. If not, the sun will suck it out as fast as you add it. You should use chlorine tabs in conjunction with shock. The slow dissolve tabs hold a chlorine residual in the water. Tabs alone, however, will not provide sufficient chlorination for a pool. The most common cause of staining is metals in your water (see question 4). This is especially likely if you have well water or a heater. Bring a water sample to Splash Pool Supply and ask to be tested for metals. If they are present in your water, we will give you a product that removes metals and staining from pools. If the staining is due to other causes, our product Stain Out will quickly and easily remove it. Alkalinity Balance, pH up, pH down, Calcium Balance, Water Stabilizer, and clarifier are all swim-safe chemicals. Wait about 20 minutes, and you are free to swim. We suggest adding algaecide, Super Erace, and shock at night, after everyone is out of the pool. It is safe to swim again the next day. We recommend running the filter 8 to 10 hours a day, and running it continuously if the water is not clear. Make sure the filter is running when you add chemicals. Backwash your sand filter once the pressure gauge reads 8 to 10 psi above normal (when it reaches 20 to 25 psi). Bump your DE filter once the pressure gauge reads 8 to 10 psi above normal (when it reaches 20 to 25 psi). When pools are especially dirty, you’ll need to bump your DE filter more frequently. If the water pressure back to your pool does not improve, take apart the filter, clean the fingers or grids with a solution, and add fresh DE powder. Replace the cartridge of a cartridge filter once a solution no longer adequately cleans it.

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What happens if you swim in a pool with low chlorine?

The Bottom Line about Pools and Chlorine – As mentioned above, you could probably swim in a pool without chlorine without any major health issues. However, long-term use of a pool lacking chlorinated H2O could make you sick or, at the very least, contribute to rashes and other types of skin irritation.

  • You could also be at risk if you have an open sore or cut, so it’s ultimately best to swim in a pool with chlorine and other properly balanced chemicals.
  • If you take care to maintain your pool’s chlorine levels on a routine basis, you can keep it clean and ensure your family will be able to enjoy it for many years to come.

If you haven’t yet built your pool, reach out to San Diego Pools, the pros with decades of experience. We’re one of the premier, and our team of pool design and construction experts is dedicated to building exactly the pool you want and providing you with the highest-quality service in the industry.

Asked By: Jeffery Torres Date: created: Sep 19 2023

Is it better to put chlorine in a pool in the morning or at night

Answered By: Clifford Henderson Date: created: Sep 22 2023

The Best Time to Add Chlorine to Your Pool – How Long To Wait Between Adding Pool Chemicals So the first question when it comes to adding chlorine to your pool is when? What is the best time to add chlorine to the pool? Most chlorine pool treatments are stabilized, meaning they will work safely and continuously whenever added. That said, UV rays from the sun naturally break down chlorine when it’s in the water, reducing its effectiveness.

  1. When swimming, the human body also adds bacteria and oils to the water.
  2. Encouraging swimmers to rinse off any lotion, hairspray, and other cosmetics before jumping in will help your pool stay more balanced.
  3. It goes without saying that kids (and adults) should also take bathroom breaks outside the pool.

It’s best to add chlorine to your pool at night, so it can work while no one is swimming and the sun has set. If you use a slow-dissolve chlorine treatment like a tab, adding it at night gives it time to dissolve, so the pool will be ready to face the day.

Asked By: Daniel Young Date: created: Oct 26 2023

Should you brush the pool before adding chemicals

Answered By: Simon Miller Date: created: Oct 26 2023

WHEN TO BRUSH YOUR POOL –

Brush After Your Pool Is Plastered/ Replastered, or Pebbled: In this case, your pool needs to be brushed twice a day for 2-3 weeks. This may seem like a lot, but there is a lot of dust that needs to be brushed and filtered, or it can stain and scale the interior surfaces. Brush after Adding Chemicals: Many powdered or granular pool chemicals don’t dissolve right away when added to the pool water. Brushing helps dissolve and disperse the chemicals so that they aren’t able to stain, scale, or etch the interior surface. Brush For Stain or Algae Prevention & Removal: Stains and algae can not be removed by chemicals alone, elbow grease is required. It doesn’t matter how much chlorine, shock, algaecide, algae preventive or algae killer you use, the surface must be brushed to break the algae’s protective surface and suspend the algae in the water so that the chemicals can do their job.

Should I add shock or chlorine first?

Differences between Stabilized and Unstabilized Chlorine – Stabilized chlorine is used as a disinfectant in automatic chlorinators. It is best for daily sanitizing because it lasts longer. This type comes in tabs (or pucks) or in granular form and can be distributed in a variety of ways, just don’t put them in the skimmer! Floating chlorinators use tabs and distribute chemicals over time.

  • Most floating chlorinators can hold anywhere from two to eight weeks worth of chlorine, depending on conditions such as the season and your pool’s size.
  • An automatic feeder works in a similar way, allowing it to mix with the pool water slowly and deliberately.
  • This type generally comes in a large bucket.

Unstabilized chlorine is used for weekly shocking. In addition, it is used to give your pool a large dose of chlorine to sanitize the water quickly after heavy use. Unstabilized chlorine provides a quick, high concentration, killing bacteria and other nasty things in the water.

It is also helpful in controlling algae, destroying organic contaminants and restoring clarity. It is best to wait before going into the pool because liquid chlorine levels will be high after shocking, but it will be safe to swim after only 24 hours. Each chlorine compound is designed for a specific purpose.

Using these two types in conjunction with one another will keep your pool clean, clear and sparkling!

How do you tell if a pool is properly chlorinated?

Your Pool’s Water Doesn’t Feel Slimy – A clean pool is also one that literally feels clean. In other words, when you put your hand in the water, it should feel wet and nothing else. However, if you’re noticing a slimy feeling on your hand, it means the chlorine isn’t working.

Asked By: Oliver Turner Date: created: Jun 08 2023

Can you swim in a pool if the chemicals are low

Answered By: Charles Wright Date: created: Jun 08 2023

The Truth About Chemical-Free Pools – The reality is that a completely “chemical-free” pool does not exist, even in nature. Technically all matter, including human beings, is made up of chemicals. When people use the term “chemical-free pool,” we can assume they are talking about added chemicals that are not naturally occurring.

Is 5 ppm chlorine safe to swim?

what is the right clorine level of a swiiming pool? if the test shows 9 should i close the pool ? The ideal level of free chlorine in the swimming pool is 2 to 4 ppm.1 to 5 ppm is acceptable and 9 ppm is on the high side.9 ppm would likely be safe to swim, but could be more of an irritant.

Asked By: Stanley Martinez Date: created: Jan 10 2023

Can I add pool chemicals together

Answered By: Ethan King Date: created: Jan 13 2023

Do-Not’s – As for the ‘do-not’s,’ you should never add water to chemicals, instead chemicals should be added to water. In the industry, people use the acronym AAA (always add acid) to remember this rule. Never pour chemicals too quickly or mix them together.

  • This includes adding different chemicals to the same bucket as well as adding different chemicals to the pool without waiting for the first one to disperse.
  • Another dangerous action is siphoning chemicals out of a container by mouth.
  • Even if the toxic chemicals do not directly enter your mouth, the fumes could enter your lungs and cause serious injury.

It’s also essential to never flush extra chemicals down any sewer line, especially those that can reach a septic system.

Asked By: Herbert Thompson Date: created: Mar 18 2024

How long do chemicals have to sit in pool

Answered By: Nathaniel Jackson Date: created: Mar 18 2024

how long do you have to wait to go swimming after putting liquid chlorine in a pool? Generally you will want to wait at least 4 hours, but ideal is waiting for one complete turnover of the water (the time it takes all the water to go through the filter). : how long do you have to wait to go swimming after putting liquid chlorine in a pool?

How long to wait between acid and chlorine?

Hydrochloric Acid – Hydrochloric acid is a chemical that should not be added to your pool at the same time as any chlorine compounds. can react with chlorine compounds to produce a highly toxic gas, so it is best to allow this acid to circulate in your pool for a minimum of one hour before adding any chlorine.

How often should you put chemicals in your pool?

What is the difference between chlorine and shock? Do I need to use both? I think I have algae. What do I do? My pool is cloudy. How do I clear it up? My water is green and does not improve with shock. How do I restore the water clarity? I have white powder at the bottom of my pool. What is it? Why do I need all these chemicals? My pool is stained. How do I clean it? How long after adding chemicals can I swim? How often should I run my filter? When should I clean or backwash it?

Chlorine is a sanitizer, and (unless you use Baquacil products) is necessary for maintaining a clear and healthy pool. Shock is chlorine, in a high dose, meant to shock your pool and raise the chlorine level quickly. Chlorine tabs (placed in a chlorinator, floater, or skimmer basket) maintain a chlorine residual in the water. You do need to use both tabs and shock. Without tabs, the chlorine shock will dissipate quickly out of the water; without shock, the chlorine level will not get high enough to fully sanitize the water. You should aim to keep the chlorine level at between 1 and 3 ppm. We suggest shocking the pool every week to two weeks; with hot weather or increased use, you may need to shock more often. When tabs run out, replace them. Algae is typically a green growth, though it may also be mustard, black, or red. Sometimes it resembles a stain along the walls or floor; if you can brush it off, it is algae. If you can’t brush it off, it is probably a stain (see question 7). You cannot test for algae — if you see it in the water, or feel a slime along the liner, then you have it. Add a dose of algaecide, bring your chlorine level high by shocking, and run the filter continuously until the problem clears. The next day you should vacuum up the dead algae and backwash your filter. Algae thrives in hot weather and in pools with low or no chlorine. Be dutiful in shocking every week to two weeks and add a maintenance dose of algaecide every other week to prevent further algae growth. Water clarity issues typically stem from one of two causes: water imbalance or filtering problems. When your pool is cloudy, first check to see if it’s balanced properly. The easiest way is to bring a water sample to Splash Pool Supply. We will analyze your water within a couple minutes and set you up with any needed chemicals. You may also use test strips or a test kit at home. Common causes for cloudy water are low chlorine or low alkalinity levels. If the water is balanced, you could try a clarifier or flocculent; these products coagulate the particles in your water and drop them to the bottom so they can be vacuumed up. Run your filter until the water clears. If treating the water does not solve the problem, you may have a filtering issue. Backwash your sand or DE filter; rinse the cartridge of your cartridge filter. If you have a sand filter, make sure to change the sand every 3 to 5 years. If you have a DE filter, try rinsing the fingers or grids with a filter solution and changing the DE powder. If these tips still do not clear the water, you may have a metal problem (see question 4). The best thing to do is bring a water sample into the store and talk to a trained employee. Once you’ve ruled out algae (see question 2), It’s time to think about metals. If the water is lime green, does not improve with shock, or gets worse after shocking, you may have metals in your water. The most common metals around here are copper and iron, especially common in well water. Chlorine oxidizes the metals, turning the water green, and sometimes staining the pool walls and floor. Bring a water sample to Splash Pool Supply and ask to be tested for metals. If they are present in your water, we will set you up with a product to remove them. You should also refrain from further shocking until the metal problem is resolved. One possibility is that chemicals added incorrectly are sitting at the bottom of your pool. Did you remember to pre-mix the calcium balance in a pail of water? Did you add the water stabilizer through the skimmer? If not, these chemicals may not have dissolved correctly. If you have a DE filter, however, it is likely that there is a tear in one of the fingers or grids inside the filter tank. DE powder escapes through these tears and is blown back into the pool. Remove the lid of the tank, wash off the fingers or grids, and carefully check for tears. You may need to replace a grid section, a few fingers, or even the whole tank. You may also have a crack or loose screws in the faceplate of the filter. Alkalinity helps to stabilize the pH; when the alkalinity is in range, the pH will fluctuate less. Low alkalinity will also cause hazy water. Alkalinity levels decrease with the acid rain; it is important to add Alkalinity Balance periodically throughout the summer to maintain a level between 100 and 150 ppm. A low pH means that your pool is acidic. Acidic water can corrode metal fittings, filter systems, and especially heaters. The pH goes down with rain, so it is important to add pH Up periodically to maintain a level between 7.2 and 7.8. A pH that is too high or too low can also irritate your eyes. If your pH is too high, you may need to add some pH down. Calcium Balance softens the water. Here in Connecticut, we tend to have rather hard water, so it is normal to need a good deal of Calcium Balance at the beginning of the season and after additions of fresh water to your pool. A proper level of calcium protects your liner and equipment from the harshness of the chemicals. If you own an inground gunite pool, adding calcium is essential; if the water is too hard, it will take minerals from the wall, thus deteriorating the walls and the paint. Calcium is also important to the clarity of your water. Water Stabilizer acts as a sunblock for your pool, helping to hold chlorine in the water. Without a high enough stabilizer (cyanuric acid) level, the chlorine that you add to the water will quickly be sucked out by the sun. Add about 2 lbs. of stabilizer per 5,000 gallons of pool water. To add, pour stabilizer very slowly through your skimmer while the pump is running. Do not backwash the filter for 5 days; if you need to vacuum or backwash, do that first. The stabilizer will dissolve under pressure in your filter. Usually you will need to add another small dose of stabilizer towards the end of July. Shock is liquid or granular chlorine. You should add one gallon (or one pound) of shock per 10,000 gallons of pool water every week to two weeks. During hot weather or frequent use, you may need to shock more frequently. Low chlorine levels often cause green or hazy water, so if your water looks a little cloudy and you haven’t shocked in a while, adding shock is the first step. It is always best to shock the pool in the evening, when the sun if off the water. If not, the sun will suck it out as fast as you add it. You should use chlorine tabs in conjunction with shock. The slow dissolve tabs hold a chlorine residual in the water. Tabs alone, however, will not provide sufficient chlorination for a pool. The most common cause of staining is metals in your water (see question 4). This is especially likely if you have well water or a heater. Bring a water sample to Splash Pool Supply and ask to be tested for metals. If they are present in your water, we will give you a product that removes metals and staining from pools. If the staining is due to other causes, our product Stain Out will quickly and easily remove it. Alkalinity Balance, pH up, pH down, Calcium Balance, Water Stabilizer, and clarifier are all swim-safe chemicals. Wait about 20 minutes, and you are free to swim. We suggest adding algaecide, Super Erace, and shock at night, after everyone is out of the pool. It is safe to swim again the next day. We recommend running the filter 8 to 10 hours a day, and running it continuously if the water is not clear. Make sure the filter is running when you add chemicals. Backwash your sand filter once the pressure gauge reads 8 to 10 psi above normal (when it reaches 20 to 25 psi). Bump your DE filter once the pressure gauge reads 8 to 10 psi above normal (when it reaches 20 to 25 psi). When pools are especially dirty, you’ll need to bump your DE filter more frequently. If the water pressure back to your pool does not improve, take apart the filter, clean the fingers or grids with a solution, and add fresh DE powder. Replace the cartridge of a cartridge filter once a solution no longer adequately cleans it.

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