Asked By: Elijah Campbell Date: created: May 31 2023

How much chlorine do I put in a 10000 Litre pool

Answered By: Abraham Scott Date: created: May 31 2023

Pool Start-Up Instructions – Massey Unichem Pharmacy Superchlorination : Whether the pool is new or is being prepared for the new season, it should first be superchlorinated. This is done by adding Bluewater Granular Pool Chlorine to a bucket of warm water at the rate of 400 grams per 10,000 litres of pool water.

  • Apply the solution to the surface of the pool, round the edge.
  • Filter to achieve complete circulation by running for 1 hour per 4000 litres.
  • Wait for 12 to 24 hours, until the chlorine level has dropped to approximately 1 p.p.m.
  • Balance the water.
  • Test the following and if needed, adjust the levels.
  • PH Buffer : Use Bluewater pH Buffer to adjust the level to between 120-150 p.p.m.

pH : Adjust to between 7.2 and 7.8 using either Bluewater pH Increase or pH Decrease. Calcium Hardness : Use Bluewater Water Hardener if necessary to bring calcium hardness up to 100 to 300 p.p.m. Stabiliser : Add Bluewater Pool Stabiliser direct to the pool at the rate of 250 grams per 10,000 litres.

  1. This will give a stabiliser level of about 30 p.p.m.
  2. The ideal level is between 30 and 70 p.p.m.
  3. Leave for 12 hours to dissolve.
  4. Routine treatment may employ Bluewater Granular Pool Chlorine, Bluewater Liquid Pool Chlorine, Bluewater Stabilised Pool Chlorine, Bluewater EconoChlor or Bluewater Stabilised Pool Chlorine Tablets.

Daily Routine Test the chlorine level daily using the test kit and add the amount of sanitiser needed to bring the level up to between 1.5 and 3.0 p.p.m. of available chlorine. The levels given below are usually sufficient. If pool treated with Bluewater Pool Stabiliser: Add 50 grams Bluewater Granular Pool Chlorine per 10,000 litres of water.

Without Bluewater Pool Stabiliser: Add 80 grams Bluewater Granular Pool Chlorine per 10,000 litres of water. Weekly Routine During the swimming season shock dose once a week or as required by using twice the normal daily dose rate (160 grams per 10,000 litres). Test pH and adjust as necessary. Monthly Routine Check pH buffer level and adjust as necessary.

Three-monthly Routine Where stabiliser is used, check the level every three months and if necessary add Bluewater Pool Stabiliser to bring the level to between 30 and 70 p.p.m. To avoid isocyanuric acid build up, Orica Chemnet recommends at least a 10 percent water loss each season.

Safety Bluewater Granular Pool Chlorine is corrosive and a strong oxidising agent. It should not come in contact with the skin, or be swallowed or inhaled. Always add the chemical to the water. NEVER add water to any chemicals. Keep it only in its original container, closed when not in use. Keep away from children.

Keep away from heat sources, sparks, flames, cigarettes or pipes. Do not store near organic materials, solvents, oils or greases. If spilt, do not add material back into the container as it will be contaminated and can cause fire. Do not reuse container for food.

  1. Superchlorination: Whether the pool is new or is being prepared for a new season, it should be superchlorinated to begin with.
  2. This is done by adding Bluewater Granular Pool Chlorine to a bucket of warm water at the rate of 400 grams per 10,000 litres of pool water.
  3. Apply the solution to the surface of the pool, round the edge.

Alternatively Bluewater Liquid pool Chlorine can be used at a rate of 2 litres per 10,000 litres of pool water Filter to achieve complete circulation by running for one hour per 4,000 litres. Wait for 12 to 24 hours, until the chlorine level has dropped to approximately 1 p.p.m.

Balance the water. Test the following and adjust levels if necessary. pH Buffer : Use Bluewater pH buffer to adjust the level to between 150-200 p.p.m. This is higher than for other sanitisers because the tablets are acid and a higher buffer level is needed to counteract the effect. pH : Adjust to between 7.2 and 7.8 using either Bluewater Poolcare pH Increase or pH Decrease.

Calcium Hardness : Use Bluewater Poolcare Water Hardener if necessary to bring calcium hardness up to 100 to 300 p.p.m Stabiliser : Add Bluewater Pool Stabiliser direct to the pool at the rate of 250 grams per 10,000 litres. This will give a stabiliser level of about 30 p.p.m.

  1. The ideal level is between 30 and 70 p.p.m.
  2. Leave for 12 hours to dissolve.
  3. Add one Bluewater Stabilised Pool Chlorine Tablet to a floater, the skimmer basket or feeder.
  4. Make sure the tablet is completely covered with water.
  5. Eep tablets away from pool liners, equipment and pumps.
  6. The level of chlorine must be maintained at 1.5 to 3.0 p.p.m.

In large pools more than one table may be needed. Daily Routine Check chlorine level daily to ensure it remains between 1.5 and 3.0 p.p.m. Add more tablets as required. (Once it has been established how many tablets are needed and how frequently they should be added in order to maintain a chlorine level of between 1.5 and 3.0 p.p.m., testing may be reduced to once a week).

  • Weekly or fortnightly shock dosing with Bluewater Granular Pool Chlorine or Bluewater Liquid Pool Chlorine may be necessary, but should only be done if the condition of the pool starts to deteriorate.
  • Monthly Routine Check pH buffer and adjust as necessary.
  • Three-month Routin It is most essential to check the stabiliser level as with Bluewater Stabilised Pool Chlorine. By using these tablets the stabiliser level can build up very rapidly

Safety Bluewater Stabilised Pool Chlorine Tablets are oxidising agents. They should not come into contact with the skin, be swallowed or inhaled. Keep only in their original container, closed when not in use. Keep away from children. Do not reuse empty containers.

  • Do not allow tablets to come into direct contact with any other form of Chlorine based product or oxidising agent) Superchlorination: Whether the pool is new or is being prepared for a new season, it should be superchlorinated to begin with.
  • This is done by adding Bluewater Granular Pool Chlorine to a bucket of warm water at the rate of 400 gms per 10,000 litres of pool water.

Apply the solution to the surface of the pool, round the edge. Alternatively, Bluewater Liquid pool Chlorine can be used at a rate of 2 litres per 10,000 litres of pool water. Filter to achieve complete circulation by running for 1 hour per 4,000 litres.

  • Wait for 12 to 24 hours, until the chlorine level has dropped to approximately 1 p.p.m.
  • Balance the water.
  • Test the following and if needed, adjust the levels.
  • PH Buffer : Use Bluewater pH Buffer to adjust the level to between 120-150 p.p.m.
  • PH : Adjust to between 7.2 and 7.8 using either Bluewater pH Increase or pH Decrease.

Calcium Hardness : Use Bluewater Water Hardener if necessary to bring calcium hardness up to 100 to 300 p.p.m. Stabiliser : Add Bluewater Pool Stabiliser direct to the pool at the rate of 250 grams per 10,000 litres. This will give a stabiliser level of about 30 p.p.m.

The ideal level is between 30 and 70 p.p.m. Leave for 12 hours to dissolve. Daily Routine Broadcast Bluewater Stabilised Pool Chlorine direct into the water at the rate of 15 grams per 10,000 litres. Avoid contact with the pool liners. Always use a chlorine test kit to check chlorine level daily. The level of free chlorine must be maintained at between 1.5 and 3.0 p.p.m.

It is possible, depending on pool use, that after the first week of daily treatment, dosing on alternate days will be sufficient to maintain the required level. Weekly Routine Test pH and adjust if necessary. Weekly or fortnightly shock dosing with Bluewater Granular Pool Chlorine may be necessary, but should only be done if the condition of the pool starts to deteriorate.

Monthly Routine Test pH buffer level and adjust if necessary. Three-monthly Routine Check the stabiliser level every 3 months and if necessary add Bluewater Pool Stabiliser to bring the level to between 30 and 70 p.p.m. Safety Bluewater Stabilised Pool Chlorine is an oxidising agent. It should not come in contact with the skin, be swallowed or inhaled.

Keep it only in its original container, closed when not in use. Keep away from children. Refer to Bluewater Granular Pool Chlorine for daily, weekly and monthly routine. Safety Bluewater Liquid Pool Chlorine is corrosive. It will irritate the eyes, skin, nose and throat.

  • It should not come in contact with the skin, be swallowed, or inhaled.
  • Eep only in its original container, in a cool dark place, away from sunlight and heat.
  • Eep away from children.
  • Marble/Concrete Pools For new pools built of this material it is recommended that the salt not be added to the pool for the first season, allowing for the calcium compounds to leach out and curing of the concrete to occur.

Water Balance Add Bluewater pH Buffer to achieve a level between 100-150 ppm. Adjust the pH to between 7.2 – 7.8 using Bluewater pH Increase or Bluewater pH Decrease. Calcium hardness levels should be as low as practical to minimise problems with calcium deposits forming on the cell.

  • Some manufacturers recommend levels of 80-100 p.p.m.
  • Therefore it is recommended to refer to the manufacturer’s recommendations for the required level.
  • Salt Levels Calculating salt to be added is dependent on the optimum concentration for each type of chlorinator.
  • For example, if the calculated volume of water in your pool is 50,000L and the optimum salt level is 5% = 50,000 x 5 divided by the quantity of salt in a bag.50,000 5 / 25 = 10 bags Before attempting to operate the chlorinator, the salt must be allowed to fully dissolve in the pool water by running the filter with the salt cell off, for at least 24 hours to circulate the water.

Salt will normally be required to be added 3-4 times a year. As a suggestion every 2 months a sample of pool water may be taken to your pool chemical supplier for analysis. Stabilisation Stabilisation will result in a more efficiently run chlorinator. This is achieved by adding Bluewater Pool Stabiliser at the rate of 250g per 10,000L of pool water to achieve a level of 30 p.p.m.

Operating the cell with insufficient salt in the water (check after very heavy rainfall).

Excessive calcium deposits on electrodes.

Insufficient water flow through the cell, filter or pump.

Physical damage to electrode coating (avoid scraping).

Cleaning solution too strong (should be approximately 8 parts water to 1 part Hydrochloric Acid Solution). Check manufacturer’s instructions for this and should only be washed for a maximum of 10 minutes.

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Pool Start Up

  1. Brush and vacuum the pool and run the filter for 24 hours, especially if the pool water is dirty after initial filling.
  2. After 24 hours, clean or backwash the filter. If it has not been chemically cleaned in the past 6 months, use Bluewater Filter Clean. If a sand filter is fitted in which the sand is more than 3 years old, it is recommended that the sand be renewed at this stage.
  3. Calculate the volume of the pool so that the right amount of chemicals to use can be determined.
  4. Take a sample of the pool water for analysis. Follow the recommendations to balance the pool water correctly.
  5. Add the start-up dose of Baquacil Concentrated Algicide
  6. Add Baqua Shock at the rate of at least 1litre per 10,000 litres of pool water. Any less will be inefficient.
  7. Run the filter continuously for 24 hours.
  8. With the pump running, pour the start-up dose of Baquacil into the water in the region of the inlet.
  9. Using Baquacil Test Strips, check that the level of Baquacil is about 50ppm. Adjust the level if necessary with a top-dose of Baquacil.
  10. The pool is now ready for use.

Note : Don’t become alarmed if the water becomes cloudy at any time during this operation. This cloudiness confirms that Baquacil is at work taking dissolved substances out of the solution. Eventually, these substances will be trapped on the filter, which must be cleaned.

This “scavenging action” of Baquacil results in water of high clarity. The water should clear within 48 hours. Note : Don’t become alarmed if the water becomes cloudy at any time during this operation. This cloudiness confirms that Baquacil is at work taking dissolved substances out of the solution. Eventually, these substances will be trapped on the filter, which must be cleaned.

This “scavenging action” of Baquacil results in water of high clarity. The water should clear within 48 hours. Converting pools treated with chlorine-based systems

  1. Remove the chlorine source, ie. cyanurate pills, electrolytic system, or make no further additions of granular, stabilised or liquid chlorine
  2. To neutralise the chlorine in the pool water, dissolve Baqua Start chlorine neutraliser in a bucket of warm water and pour the solution into the pool.
  3. Run the filter for about 8 hours.
  4. Check the chlorine level with a test kit. If any is detected, repeat step 2.
  5. When the chlorine level is zero, follow the procedures given under Freshly filled pools, steps 4 to 9.

Converting pools treated with bromine based systems

  1. Disconnect and totally remove the bromine source.
  2. Follow the instructions for converting a pool previously treated with a chlorine-based system (Baqua Start will neutralise bromine as well as chlorine).

Converting pools treated with salt-water ionisers

  1. Disconnect and totally remove the ionising device.
  2. Analyse the water to determine the level of total dissolved solids (TDS)
  3. Either totally replace the pool water, or dilute it sufficiently to reduce the TDS level to below 1000ppm.
  4. Follow the instructions for converting a pool previously treated with a chlorine-based system above.

Weekly Pool Care

  1. Test the level of Baquacil and top up to 50ppm when the test strip indicates the level has dropped to 25ppm.
  2. Test pH and adjust if out of the range 7.2 – 7.8.
  3. Add a maintenance dose of Baquacil Concentrated Algicide (follow directions on bottle).
  4. The frequency of required top-up doses will vary from pool to pool. Usually it is necessary to add Baquacil every 10 to 14 days. However, for the first two to six weeks following conversion, a percentage of pool owners may find the need to re-dose more frequently. This is because Baquacil is removing existing impurities from the pool water. Once these impurities are removed, the pool should follow the regular maintenance schedule.

Adding Baquacil Concentrated Algicide weekly will prevent algae growth, which can ruin a pool’s appearance, make pool walls slippery and unsafe, and clog filters. Baquacil Concentrated Algicide and Baquacil work together to maximise protection. Monthly Pool Care Carefully add the appropriate dose of Baqua Shock (1 litre per 10,000 litres of pool water.

Adding Baqua Shock swimming pool clarifier once a month will help maintain the pool’s sparkle. The accumulation of swimmer wastes such as perspiration, urine, and cosmetic products can cause eye and skin irritation and give algae plenty on which to feed. The addition of Baqua Shock and adequate filtration will take care of these undesirable waste materials.

Carefully pour Baqua Shock directly into the pool near the return line with the filter running. Allow Baqua Shock to disperse throughout the pool water for several minutes before swimming. Winterising a Baquacil Pool Customers who live in an area where the weather gets cold will need to close their pool for the winter to protect it from structural damage.

  1. Check the water balance, and adjust if necessary.
  2. Perform any necessary housekeeping. Brush and vacuum the pool thoroughly. Clean the waterline, the skimmer box and basket, and the pump’s hair/lint strainer basket. If the pool is to be completely shut down, store the baskets.
  3. Sanitise and clarify the pool. This is “winterising”, a simple three-step process
  4. Top-up Baquacil to 50ppm.
  5. Add a maintenance dose of Baquacil Concentrated Algicide.
  6. Add a maintenance dose of Baqua Shock
  7. Backwash and clean the filter. Never store a dirty filter because deposits may harden over the winter, leaving a tough job in the spring. Filter Clean will remove organic and mineral deposits, leaving the filter ready for the start-up in spring. (Pool Algicide & Winteriser may also be used following label instructions.)
  8. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations for winterising pool filter and equipment in your area.
  9. Cover the pool. This will keep the water free of leaves and airborne debris. If a mesh cover is used or the pool is not covered, check the level of Baquacil about once a month. If the level drops to 25ppm, add a top-up dose (pouring around the sides of pool) to bring the level back to 50ppm.
  10. In areas with mild winters, some pool owners leave the pool open. As pool usage declines in the cooler weather, reduce regular maintenance. Check the level of Baquacil and pH every two to four weeks (depending on the severity of the winter) and top up as necessary. Run the filter system at least 8 hours a day. Remove leaves and debris from the pool as necessary.

: Pool Start-Up Instructions – Massey Unichem Pharmacy

Asked By: Jeffery Baker Date: created: May 16 2024

How much chlorine do I put in a 5000 Litre tank

Answered By: Robert Johnson Date: created: May 16 2024

It takes about 5 milligrams of chlorine per litre to disinfect the water in your tank. However, this will depend on the quality of the water.

Asked By: Alexander Lopez Date: created: Feb 26 2023

How much chlorine do I add to a 25000 Litre pool

Answered By: Logan Walker Date: created: Feb 28 2023

How much liquid chlorine to add to pool? – Depending on whether you are using a stabiliser in your pool will determine the amount of chlorine required. To maintain the correct chlorine levels, you should add 200ml per 10,000 litres daily to stabilised pool water and 400ml daily to unstabilised pool water.01/16/2023 06:33:53

Asked By: Gerld Brooks Date: created: Feb 10 2023

How much chlorine do I add to a 3000 Litre pool

Answered By: Francis Parker Date: created: Feb 13 2023

How Much Chlorine To Add To Pool Calculator How much chlorine should I add to my pool? – A pool’s ideal chlorine level should sit between 1 and 3 parts per million (ppm). If your level is less than this, you should add chlorine. But how much is enough? It’s generally recommended you add 85ml of chlorine per 4500 litres of water, while keeping your pool filter running.

How often should I chlorinate my pool?

What is the difference between chlorine and shock? Do I need to use both? I think I have algae. What do I do? My pool is cloudy. How do I clear it up? My water is green and does not improve with shock. How do I restore the water clarity? I have white powder at the bottom of my pool. What is it? Why do I need all these chemicals? My pool is stained. How do I clean it? How long after adding chemicals can I swim? How often should I run my filter? When should I clean or backwash it?

Chlorine is a sanitizer, and (unless you use Baquacil products) is necessary for maintaining a clear and healthy pool. Shock is chlorine, in a high dose, meant to shock your pool and raise the chlorine level quickly. Chlorine tabs (placed in a chlorinator, floater, or skimmer basket) maintain a chlorine residual in the water. You do need to use both tabs and shock. Without tabs, the chlorine shock will dissipate quickly out of the water; without shock, the chlorine level will not get high enough to fully sanitize the water. You should aim to keep the chlorine level at between 1 and 3 ppm. We suggest shocking the pool every week to two weeks; with hot weather or increased use, you may need to shock more often. When tabs run out, replace them. Algae is typically a green growth, though it may also be mustard, black, or red. Sometimes it resembles a stain along the walls or floor; if you can brush it off, it is algae. If you can’t brush it off, it is probably a stain (see question 7). You cannot test for algae — if you see it in the water, or feel a slime along the liner, then you have it. Add a dose of algaecide, bring your chlorine level high by shocking, and run the filter continuously until the problem clears. The next day you should vacuum up the dead algae and backwash your filter. Algae thrives in hot weather and in pools with low or no chlorine. Be dutiful in shocking every week to two weeks and add a maintenance dose of algaecide every other week to prevent further algae growth. Water clarity issues typically stem from one of two causes: water imbalance or filtering problems. When your pool is cloudy, first check to see if it’s balanced properly. The easiest way is to bring a water sample to Splash Pool Supply. We will analyze your water within a couple minutes and set you up with any needed chemicals. You may also use test strips or a test kit at home. Common causes for cloudy water are low chlorine or low alkalinity levels. If the water is balanced, you could try a clarifier or flocculent; these products coagulate the particles in your water and drop them to the bottom so they can be vacuumed up. Run your filter until the water clears. If treating the water does not solve the problem, you may have a filtering issue. Backwash your sand or DE filter; rinse the cartridge of your cartridge filter. If you have a sand filter, make sure to change the sand every 3 to 5 years. If you have a DE filter, try rinsing the fingers or grids with a filter solution and changing the DE powder. If these tips still do not clear the water, you may have a metal problem (see question 4). The best thing to do is bring a water sample into the store and talk to a trained employee. Once you’ve ruled out algae (see question 2), It’s time to think about metals. If the water is lime green, does not improve with shock, or gets worse after shocking, you may have metals in your water. The most common metals around here are copper and iron, especially common in well water. Chlorine oxidizes the metals, turning the water green, and sometimes staining the pool walls and floor. Bring a water sample to Splash Pool Supply and ask to be tested for metals. If they are present in your water, we will set you up with a product to remove them. You should also refrain from further shocking until the metal problem is resolved. One possibility is that chemicals added incorrectly are sitting at the bottom of your pool. Did you remember to pre-mix the calcium balance in a pail of water? Did you add the water stabilizer through the skimmer? If not, these chemicals may not have dissolved correctly. If you have a DE filter, however, it is likely that there is a tear in one of the fingers or grids inside the filter tank. DE powder escapes through these tears and is blown back into the pool. Remove the lid of the tank, wash off the fingers or grids, and carefully check for tears. You may need to replace a grid section, a few fingers, or even the whole tank. You may also have a crack or loose screws in the faceplate of the filter. Alkalinity helps to stabilize the pH; when the alkalinity is in range, the pH will fluctuate less. Low alkalinity will also cause hazy water. Alkalinity levels decrease with the acid rain; it is important to add Alkalinity Balance periodically throughout the summer to maintain a level between 100 and 150 ppm. A low pH means that your pool is acidic. Acidic water can corrode metal fittings, filter systems, and especially heaters. The pH goes down with rain, so it is important to add pH Up periodically to maintain a level between 7.2 and 7.8. A pH that is too high or too low can also irritate your eyes. If your pH is too high, you may need to add some pH down. Calcium Balance softens the water. Here in Connecticut, we tend to have rather hard water, so it is normal to need a good deal of Calcium Balance at the beginning of the season and after additions of fresh water to your pool. A proper level of calcium protects your liner and equipment from the harshness of the chemicals. If you own an inground gunite pool, adding calcium is essential; if the water is too hard, it will take minerals from the wall, thus deteriorating the walls and the paint. Calcium is also important to the clarity of your water. Water Stabilizer acts as a sunblock for your pool, helping to hold chlorine in the water. Without a high enough stabilizer (cyanuric acid) level, the chlorine that you add to the water will quickly be sucked out by the sun. Add about 2 lbs. of stabilizer per 5,000 gallons of pool water. To add, pour stabilizer very slowly through your skimmer while the pump is running. Do not backwash the filter for 5 days; if you need to vacuum or backwash, do that first. The stabilizer will dissolve under pressure in your filter. Usually you will need to add another small dose of stabilizer towards the end of July. Shock is liquid or granular chlorine. You should add one gallon (or one pound) of shock per 10,000 gallons of pool water every week to two weeks. During hot weather or frequent use, you may need to shock more frequently. Low chlorine levels often cause green or hazy water, so if your water looks a little cloudy and you haven’t shocked in a while, adding shock is the first step. It is always best to shock the pool in the evening, when the sun if off the water. If not, the sun will suck it out as fast as you add it. You should use chlorine tabs in conjunction with shock. The slow dissolve tabs hold a chlorine residual in the water. Tabs alone, however, will not provide sufficient chlorination for a pool. The most common cause of staining is metals in your water (see question 4). This is especially likely if you have well water or a heater. Bring a water sample to Splash Pool Supply and ask to be tested for metals. If they are present in your water, we will give you a product that removes metals and staining from pools. If the staining is due to other causes, our product Stain Out will quickly and easily remove it. Alkalinity Balance, pH up, pH down, Calcium Balance, Water Stabilizer, and clarifier are all swim-safe chemicals. Wait about 20 minutes, and you are free to swim. We suggest adding algaecide, Super Erace, and shock at night, after everyone is out of the pool. It is safe to swim again the next day. We recommend running the filter 8 to 10 hours a day, and running it continuously if the water is not clear. Make sure the filter is running when you add chemicals. Backwash your sand filter once the pressure gauge reads 8 to 10 psi above normal (when it reaches 20 to 25 psi). Bump your DE filter once the pressure gauge reads 8 to 10 psi above normal (when it reaches 20 to 25 psi). When pools are especially dirty, you’ll need to bump your DE filter more frequently. If the water pressure back to your pool does not improve, take apart the filter, clean the fingers or grids with a solution, and add fresh DE powder. Replace the cartridge of a cartridge filter once a solution no longer adequately cleans it.

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How much chlorine to add to 800 litres?

Chemical Start-up Instructions Once you have filled your Spa with water, you will need to add your preferred Sanitiser. Ideally wait until the Spa is above 20 degrees Celsius so the chemicals will dissolve quicker. Add chemicals as instructed below with pumps on, leave for 5-10 mins before replacing cover.

  • CHLORINE
  • Chlorine Granules Level 3-5 PPM
  • BROMINE
  • Bromine Granules Level 4-6 PPM
  • Dosage Instructions for Chlorine/Bromine Granules

Chlorine is the most commonly use sanitiser and an effective way to kill bacteria in your water. If you have skin reactions to Chlorine then you can use Bromine, the only downside to Bromine is that it is a slower reacting chemical and not as effective at killing bacteria.

If you are using Chlorine Granules you need to keep your level of Chlorine between 3-5 ppm (parts per million). Simply sprinkle the granules into the water with the pumps on, leave for 5-10 minutes then turn off the pumps and replace the cover. Favoured and recommended by many Spa and Hot Tub suppliers, as it is kinder on the skin particularly if you have children, it is also less volatile at high temperatures.

If you are using Bromine Granules you need to keep your level of Bromine between 4-6 ppm (parts per million). Simply sprinkle the granules into the water with the pumps on, leave for 5-10 minutes then turn off the pumps and replace the cover.

Water (Litres) Add Chlorine (Weekly) Bromine (Weekly)
600-800 ¾ Teaspoon/Capful ¾ Teaspoon/Capful
900-1200 1 & ½ Teaspoons/Capfuls 1 & ½ Teaspoons/Capfuls
1300-1500 2 Teaspoons/Capfuls 2 Teaspoons/Capfuls
1600-1800 3 Teaspoons/Capfuls 3 Teaspoons/Capfuls

Leave for 24 hours and check your levels with the ph Test Strips, you should be able to smell the chemicals. Maintain the pH balance between 7.4 and 7.6 and alkalinity level of 125ppm – 150ppm. It easier to correct if under dosed, rather than if it has been overdosed – so go easy with the chemicals! IMPORTANT NOTE: On first start-up of fresh water you will use more sanitiser, after 24 hours once heated check levels with test strips and add more sanitiser as required.

Also note, the more people using the Spa the more sanitiser you will need to add. Lack of sanister can cause your water to go cloudy. Bromine Tablets A very easy to use and cost effective sanitiser, simply put 3-5 tablets in a floating dispenser and adjust the collar accordingly. Allow 24 hours for the tablets to take effect and check bromine levels with ph Test Strips, maintaining a bromine level of 4-6 mg/l.

Tablets will take 10-14 days to dissolve, check regularly and keep between 3-5 tablets in dispenser at all times. SPA RANGE WATER CAPACITY

SPA Name Spa Water Capacity
Tiny 600 litres
Aurora 1800 litres
Destiny 1500 litres
Twin Spa 900 litres
Sure 3 1150 litres
Neva Plus 1100 litres
Neva 1100 litres
Ultimate 1650 litres
Ultimate Plus 1650 litres
Moonlight 1200 litres
Volta 1470 litres
Sunset 4 1450 litres
Rhine 1650 litres
Atlantic 1600 litres
Niagara 1600 litres
Helsinki 930 litres
Horizon 800 litres
Munich 1300 litres

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  • If you have ordered the Chemical Start Kit, you will also receive the following items:-
  • Non-Chlorine Shock
  • Non-Chlorine Shock is an oxidiser that will directly oxidise the waste itself. This is ideal to use in Spas with heavy usages, it does not use chlorine, it does not smell as strong as chlorine and it eliminates waste and odour in the water before it takes hold.

    You can also use this with new water and/or add a dose on a weekly basis to present your water from deteriorating. Add after bathing as instructed on the with the circulation pump running. To be used in conjunction with your preferred sanitiser. Pool Clean (Water Clarifier) Small particulates of dirt or foreign matter that are below 20 microns usually pass through the filtration systems of spas and can leave the water looking cloudy.

    Pool clean is a liquid product that flocculates (coagulates) these particles into larger clusters so they can be filtered out of the water. Once you have used Pool Clean make sure you jet wash your filters. Add as instructed on bottle.

    • PH Minus (reducer)
    • PH Plus (Increaser)
    • Antifoam
    • 3 in 1 test strips

    The effectiveness of all chlorine based sanitisers decreases as the pH level of the water increases. pH reducer can be added directly to the water to reduce the pH to a desirable level. For the chlorine to remain effective, the pH level should be kept below 7.6.

    However, if the pH level drops too low then the water can start to degrade pumps and liners, so aim to keep the pH level between 7.4 and 7.6 pH. Add as instructed on bottle. Bathing water that is low in pH can be corrosive to pool pumps, heat exchangers and damage the pool lining. pH plus can be used to raise the pH to a desirable level.

    However, too high a pH level and the effectiveness of all chlorine sanitisers starts to decrease. Always aim for a pH level of between 7.4 and 7.6. pH. Add as instructed on bottle. Antifoam will eliminate foam which is built up from such products like sun cream, fake tan, oils and many cosmetics.

    This chemical will disperse foam build up instantly. Once you have used Antifoam, make sure you jet wash your filters. Add as instructed on bottle. These test strips test the levels of Free Chlorine/Bromine, pH & Total Alkalinity to keep you and your family safe. To use dip a strip into water and remove immediately, hold strip level for 15 seconds (do not shake excess water from strip).

    Compare Free Chlorine/Bromine, pH and Total Alkalinity pads (in that order) to colour chart on label. : Chemical Start-up Instructions

    How much chlorine do I add to 1 litre of water?

    Other Disinfection Methods – If you don’t have liquid bleach, you can use one of the other disinfection methods described below.

    Granular calcium hypochlorite. The first step is to make a chlorine solution that you will use to disinfect your water. For your safety, do it in a ventilated area and wear eye protection. Add one heaping teaspoon (approximately ¼ ounce) of high-test granular calcium hypochlorite (HTH) to two gallons of water and stir until the particles have dissolved. The mixture will produce a chlorine solution of approximately 500 milligrams per liter. To disinfect water, add one part of the chlorine solution to each 100 parts of water you are treating. This is about the same as adding 1 pint (16 ounces) of the chlorine solution to 12.5 gallons of water. If the chlorine taste is too strong, pour the water from one clean container to another and let it stand for a few hours before use. CAUTION: HTH is a very powerful oxidant. Follow the instructions on the label for safe handling and storage of this chemical. Common household iodine (or “tincture of iodine”). You may have iodine in your medicine cabinet or first aid kit. Add five drops of 2% tincture of iodine to each quart or liter of water that you are disinfecting. If the water is cloudy or colored, add 10 drops of iodine. Stir and let the water stand for at least 30 minutes before use. Water disinfection tablets. You can disinfect water with tablets that contain chlorine, iodine, chlorine dioxide, or other disinfecting agents. These tablets are available online or at pharmacies and sporting goods stores. Follow the instructions on the product label as each product may have a different strength.

    Asked By: Geoffrey Foster Date: created: Jun 01 2023

    Can I swim 12 hours after shocking pool

    Answered By: Jesse Henderson Date: created: Jun 03 2023

    Can you swim in the pool after you shock a pool? – You need to wait for at least 8 hours and up to 24 hours after using a chlorine-based shock before you can swim. And you’ll want to retest your water to make sure your chemical levels are within range.

    How much chlorine do I add to a 20000 litre pool?

    Question 1: How many tablets do I need for my pool? – If you’ve got standard chlorine tablets (200g each), you’ll need one tablet per 20,000 litres. So for a pool that contains 60,000 litres of water, you’ll need 3 tablets every week to keep it sanitised. To be on the safe side, we recommend testing your water balance regularly and adding tablets as necessary.

    Do I need to add chlorine to my pool daily?

    The Right Level of Pool Chemicals – Since adding chemicals to your pool is a chemical reaction, it must be done with the utmost care to stay in the right range where chlorine kills bacteria without harming you. Ideally, you should have 3 ppm (parts per million) of chlorine in your pool.

    This means that for every million molecules in your pool water, 3 of them should be chlorine. Although this seems like a small amount, this chemical is powerful enough that this small concentration is enough to keep your pool clean. You can test your pool water using chemical test strips, which you can purchase at any pool supply store.

    These can show you the ppm values of any number of important pool chemicals. They also help you manage pH, alkalinity, and calcium hardness. Each chemical level can be managed by adding different compounds to your pool. Under normal circumstances, you should add a tablet of chlorine every 3-7 days, depending on the results of your water tests.

    How much chlorine does it take to shock a 20000 litre pool?

    A Guide to Shock Dosing a Swimming Pool –

    Grade Pool Description Shock Treatment Chlorine
    1 Pool apears clean & clear.6 ppm No algae growth. The floor at the deepest part is clearly visible. 6 ppm
    2 Pool not quite clear.10 ppm Traces of algae on skimmers. The deep end of the pool is just visible. 10 ppm
    3 Pool with noticeable haze.20 ppm Shallow end floor clearly visible. Deep end not visible. 20 ppm
    4 Pool slightly cloudy.30 ppm Shallow end floor not quite visible. 30 ppm
    5 Pool pale green.40 ppm Top 3 steps visible but no floors. 40 ppm
    6 Pool distinctly green.60 ppm Top steps only visible. 60 ppm

    Approximate amount of chlorine to give 6ppm and 10ppm

    Pool Size Litres of 10% available chlorine Sodium Hypochlorite needed to give: Grams of 60% available chlorine Granules to give:
    Gallons 6 ppm 10 ppm 6 ppm 10 ppm
    5000 1 2 300 450
    10000 3 5 600 900
    15000 4 7 900 1350
    20000 6 9 1200 1800

    When shock dosing the chlorine granules should be dissolved in warm water before being dispersed around the pool. Ensure the pump is circulating so the chlorine is evenly distributed around the pool. Concentrated quantities of chlorine will cause the liner to bleach.

    For over 15 years, Little Giant has been providing pool cover pump solutions for residential water transfer applications. Find out more about how they deliver high-performance, compact, lightweight and easy-to-use pool cover pumps in our guide. Read more For most of us, winter marks the end of the swimming season. So, you’re likely starting to think about the best ways to close your pool to keep it safe during colder months – our winterising guide offers some helpful tips. Read more

    How much chlorine does it take to shock a 30000 litre pool?

    How to Super Chlorinate your Pool to 20 PPM with Liquid Chlorine (Sodium Hypochlorite) – Here is an example. Your 30,000-gallon pool has an accidental liquid fecal release. Your pool has a Free Available Chlorine (FAC) level of 2 ppm. How much liquid chlorine/sodium hypochlorite would be needed to reach the mandated 20 ppm Superchlorination to respond to an accidental liquid fecal release? You will be using 12.5% sodium hypochlorite.

    1. Test your pool water to determine the amount of free chlorine (FAC) in parts per million (PPM).
    2. Determine how many ppm you will need to increase the chlorine level to 20 ppm.
    3. Use the information on the product label or formula to figure out how much product will be needed to increase the amount of free chlorine by 1 ppm per 10,000 gallons of water. In the case of 12.5% sodium hypochlorite, this would be 10.7 fl ounces.
    4. Ensure your pH level is between 7.2 and 7.8. This greatly increases the effectiveness of the chlorine. If it is out of this range, it will lessen its effect.
    5. If you already know how much product it takes to add 1 PPM, you may skip this step. If not, here is how to calculate the amount of chlorine needed. It takes 1 ounce of chlorine in 7,500 gallons of water to equal 1 ppm. We will divide 30,000 gallons by 7,500 to get 4. It requires 4 ounces of chlorine to raise the parts per million of this example pool by 1. The pool already has a level of 2, so we will need to raise the level by 18 to reach our goal of 20.
      1. 4 ounces of chlorine x 18 ppm = 72 ounces. Since this product is 12.5% available chlorine, we will divide 72 by,125. This results in 576 ounces of sodium hypochlorite.4.5 gallons of product.
    6. Broadcast the sodium hypochlorite directly into your pool water. Hold this level for approx.16 hours to complete the super chlorination cycle at 20 ppm.
    Asked By: Bernard Lewis Date: created: Feb 09 2023

    How much chlorine per litre in pool

    Answered By: Patrick Jones Date: created: Feb 10 2023

    If chlorine is used, the free residual chlorine concentration in your pool should be maintained at 1.0 to 3.0 mg/L. The ideal level is 2 mg/L. When a pool is not in use, a method such as a floating immersion dispenser should be used to disinfect the pool water at all times.

    How much chlorine for 1500 litres?

    Setting up your shiny new hot tub – When a hot tub is filled with fresh water, it is important to add a sufficiently high dose of sanitiser. This can be done by adding 60g of chlorine granules per 1,500 litres of water to start the sanitation process and allowing the level to drop to 3-5mg/l (mg per litre) before using your spa.

    Asked By: Jesus Allen Date: created: Jan 14 2023

    How much chlorine for 20 litres

    Answered By: Gabriel Ramirez Date: created: Jan 17 2023

    Calculation of the chlorine amount For 20 litres of water, it will take 0.5 g of chlorine tablet. For 30 litres of water, it will take 0.7 g of chlorine tablet. For 60 litres of water, it will take 1.5 g of chlorine tablet.

    Asked By: Leonars Baker Date: created: Apr 08 2024

    How many chlorine tablets for 5000 litre pool

    Answered By: Landon Bailey Date: created: Apr 08 2024

    Step 3: How many chlorine tablets do I need to add to my swimming pool? – Now that you have determined the pH level and the chlorine level of your pool, it is important to decide how many chlorine tablets you need to add. This depends on the following:

    The amount of hours of sunshine and the UV index: the more sunshine, the more the chlorine level drops. Bugs and leaves in the swimming pool water: leaves and bugs cause the active chlorine in the pool water to diminish. The number of hours swum per day: the more you swim, the more the chlorine is broken down.

    Does your pool water have the proper pH level? Then you can easily calculate the amount of chlorine by calculating 0.013 grams of chlorine per 100 litres of water (number of litres of your pool / 100 x 0.013). For example, do you have a pool of 5000 litre swimming pool? Then add about 1 to 2 chlorine tables of 20 grams to the water.

    Always allow previous chlorine tablets to dissolve completely before adding new tablets to the pool water. Tip: do not add the tablets directly to the pool to prevent damaging the upholstery. Make use of a floating chlorine dispenser or first dissolve the tablets in water and spread the liquid over the water surface.

    Did you get a little too enthusiastic and did too much chlorine end up in your pool water? That is not a problem at all. Just leave your roller shutter or cover open for a while and the chlorine level will automatically drop through the UV rays of the sun.

    How much chlorine do I need per Litre?

    What are safe levels of chloramine in water? – Chloramine levels up to 4 milligrams per liter (mg/L) or 4 parts per million (ppm) are considered safe in drinking water. At these levels, harmful health effects are unlikely to occur.

    Asked By: Alexander Russell Date: created: Jan 14 2024

    How much chlorine does a 1000 Litre hot tub need

    Answered By: Curtis Price Date: created: Jan 14 2024

    How much chlorine should I add to my hot tub? – Aim to maintain a chlorine level of 3 to 5mg/l at all times. How frequently you add more chlorine will depend on your usage and bathing habits. It could be daily, every two to three days or weekly. For 1mg/l, add 2g per 1000 litres. Top tip: 10ml = approximately 10g

    Asked By: Gregory Anderson Date: created: Mar 24 2023

    How many chlorine tablets for 1000 litre hot tub

    Answered By: Jayden Young Date: created: Mar 24 2023

    Need to know – Please note: Use in Jacuzzi hot tubs will void the shell warranty. Not recommended for Jacuzzi and several other makes of hot tub as overuse can result in damage to your spa. If in doubt about their useage seek guidance. A chlorine level between 3-5mg/l must be maintained in your hot tub/spa at all times.

    How much chlorine for 1500 litres?

    Setting up your shiny new hot tub – When a hot tub is filled with fresh water, it is important to add a sufficiently high dose of sanitiser. This can be done by adding 60g of chlorine granules per 1,500 litres of water to start the sanitation process and allowing the level to drop to 3-5mg/l (mg per litre) before using your spa.