Asked By: Gavin James Date: created: Nov 15 2023

How do they film 60 Days In

Answered By: Douglas Bell Date: created: Nov 17 2023

Over the course of two months, a clandestine operation took place at Clark County Jail in Jeffersonville, Indiana. Unbeknownst to the inmates and to the guards, seven law-abiding citizens had volunteered to go undercover as jailed convicts in an attempt to help Sheriff Jamey Noel expose rampant drug use, crime, and corruption within the facility’s walls.

This is the premise for 60 Days In, a gripping A&E docuseries that, since its debut in March, has become TV’s No.1 new unscripted cable series and the network’s No.1 program. The show — brainchild of executive producer Greg Henry and Noel, who runs Clark County Jail — offers not only an unprecedented viewing experience, but a fascinating examination of how and why prison changes people.

But pulling this series off was no easy feat. In addition to finding seven volunteers willing to exit their regularly scheduled lives and dwell among murderers, these select inmates were charged with investigating the jail while also attempting to keep their identities a secret.

Producers also needed to consult an army of lawyers about the legality of this endeavor, cover the prison in cameras and microphones, invent a plausible cover story for their documentary crew, and ensure they could keep the participants safe, sane, and focused on the mission. Despite two participants quitting during production — one for incredibly dubious reasons — the production succeeded with the task at hand for the most part.

During the May 19 season finale, Noel said that the initiative had provided him with invaluable information about the prison’s weaknesses and the nefarious ways prisoners exploited them. “I’m surprised that it worked, but whether it’s through luck or hard work, we made sure it would work,” Henry told BuzzFeed News during a phone interview.

“It’s probably the first show I’ve ever made that I, felt in my bones should be watched. We’re really proud we pulled it off.” Over the course of an hourlong conversation, Henry explained how 60 Days In was executed, the unplanned moments that shocked him, what he really thinks of the participants who quit, and more lingering questions 60 Days In fans are dying to know.

Greg Henry had a long-standing interest in producing shows that offer a unique look inside the U.S. prison system. He worked on Behind Bars: Rookie Year, Hard Time, and the County Jail series, but an identical frustration resurfaced in every one of these experiences.

  1. Every time we make a series in a prison, we come away feeling like everybody that we spoke to sort of had an ulterior motive and we weren’t getting a true perspective on what it was like to do time,” he said.
  2. We were getting it through the eyes of someone who had committed a crime and therefore they earned their way to where they were.

Or, with correction officers, they always have their perspective on the world as well. We really wanted to figure out a show where the voices you heard would be you and me. They would be ordinary citizens. so we would get to see it from a truly unbiased perspective.” A&E jumped at the opportunity and Henry’s team began meeting with sheriffs around the country to try and find a facility that would meet their herculean needs.

Enter Noel. “I met Sheriff Noel in Indiana and told him, broadly, what we were thinking and he laughed — in a good way,” Henry recalled. The sheriff was elected on the heels of a corrupt administration and was attempting reform, but “he could only see topically how the reforms were taking shape and he could never get an inmate to give him the straight truth because the rules of the game are: If you talk to the cops, you’re a snitch.

That was our starting point and together we talked about what he could do, what he wanted to do, but also understanding that by doing it on television, he could potentially have a much larger impact than just a local one on his facility. We took his lead, but it became a true collaboration.” Is it legal to actively place non-offenders behind bars if they haven’t been charged or convicted of a crime in a court of law? Turns out, yes.

  1. The bigger legal quandary production faced involved the rights of the inmates already in the jail.
  2. The first hurdles were just looking at the constitutionality of 24/7 in a facility,” said Henry.
  3. We assembled some of the constitutional lawyers through our law firm, we had hours upon hours — which equals very expensive — conversations where we were going through every point.

Every camera placement that we had, you would balance ‘This would be the best camera angle’ against ‘This is what the Constitution allows us.'” This is why you never see into bathroom areas or showers. “Those are zones that are completely protected and we’d never want to violate that privacy,” Henry said.

  1. In addition to the 16 fully robotic cameras and 64 microphones, Henry and his team filmed inside the cells and conducted one-on-one interviews with the inmates under the guise of producing a documentary about first-time offenders, a description that conveniently applied to every 60 Days In inmate.
  2. From the guards to those jailed, anybody who was shown on camera also signed a release agreeing to be filmed.

The ones who didn’t want to participate were simply moved to another housing pod. “We had around 300 inmates who were willing to participate.” As for the bait-and-switch about the doc’s intent, Henry said, “We’re not coming out and deceiving anyone; we’re just telling them the doc is about first-timers and that’s the place we landed where everyone felt comfortable.” Henry’s team got an early taste of how unpredictable this filming experience would be during the casting process.

One of the most surprising things was how many folks were willing to put aside their lives for two months to participate in a program like this,” he said. Henry estimates that they met with more than 300 people to try and find seven who satisfied the endeavor’s needs. “It was a massive, mostly unconventional effort,” said Henry, who culled candidates in part from online support and chat groups for victims, offenders, and law enforcement.

Then all the participants were put through rigorous background and medical checks. “You can’t put somebody behind bars who has a chronic medical problem because they’re in there under an assumed name and there’s no way to get them medication.” Then began the process of identifying the ideal participant archetypes.

“The sheriff knew going in that if he had seven, he was not going to get a full perspective on what was happening inside from every possible angle.” So Henry and his team offered Noel, who had final say on all subjects, a rich list of the best candidates from which to pick. “It’s months upon months of work to get it to the place we got it to,

but probably the most rigorous you will find in any television show.” In the end, the seven people chosen for the program were Barbra, a stay-at-home mom; Isaiah, a 19-year-old whose brother was a convict; Jeff, a security guard; Maryum, a social worker (and Muhammad Ali’s daughter); Robert, a teacher; Tami, a law enforcement officer; and Zac, an ex-Marine.

  • From the very beginning there was something off about Robert.
  • And it wasn’t simply that he asked irrelevant and odd questions during the participants’ life-or-death training seminar before entering the jail.
  • His entire attitude toward the project never seemed on the up-and-up — suspicions that were validated when Robert stepped foot inside his cell and promptly disregarded everything the professionals told him to do and not to do.

“Robert was very touch-and-go, very minute to minute because he went in and kind of did his own thing,” Henry said. “For Robert, we were confident that a teacher’s perspective might bring something, but things were different once that slammer door closed.

The sheriff is very clear about his disappointment in the show on the tactic Robert took.” About halfway through his time on the show, Robert became a target for the other inmates as they easily saw through the “facts” in his cover story. Sensing he might be in danger, Robert placed a towel over one of the cameras, a major inmate infraction, earning him a month in solitary confinement.

While this meant he was no longer able to offer the program or the sheriff any valuable information, Robert was in heaven: He no longer needed to worry about his safety and was able to do nothing but read, one of his most cherished pastimes. It was a slap in the face to the entire operation and an utter waste of the opportunity.

  • Unfortunately production simply couldn’t pull Robert out of the unit.
  • If he did not get the same treatment that any other inmate would get, it would raise questions among the staff and it would also get to the inmates because he had certainly made enough noise that people knew who he was,” Henry explained.

“So when he gets a 30-day commitment to segregation, at that point, if he wants to tap out, he can tap out. This is the part of the show where there are rules, there regulations, and they have to be followed, if anybody appears to be receiving favoritism, or if somebody has doubts, it raises questions.

That speaks to the authenticity of this whole program.” In the end, as his time in solitary was wrapping up, Robert complained of a debilitating stomach ache and asked to be released from the program so he could see a doctor. The doctor couldn’t find anything medically wrong with him, which was a relatively predictable diagnosis given that Robert previously wrote Sheriff Noel a secret note right before he fell ill asking not to be put back into general population.

In terms of being a watchable character and an insider Sheriff Noel relied upon to uncover new information, no 60 Days In participant was more effective than Zac. His military experience allowed him to seamlessly integrate into two separate prisoner groups, a social maneuver that resulted in authorities uncovering deadly weapons and other contraband the prisoners were hiding.

“If you were to say, ‘We’re going to only use one person and just have one point of view,’ Zac was the closest to what the sheriff was trying to pull off,” Henry said. “Now, that said, he wasn’t always perfect. He screwed up royally when he called that guy a bitch.” The other big screwup happened in Episode 5 when Zac was called to stand before a judge.

The demand shocked not only Zac but also production, as none of the seven participants were actually placed in jail by the court, so certainly none of them should have ever been asked to go into court. The confusion stemmed from the fact that — unbeknownst to producers — there was another inmate named Zac Holland at the same prison, and the wrong one had been summoned.

  1. But if the show’s Zac actually made it all the way to court and in front of a judge, the massive, million-dollar secret would be immediately blown, as Zac would have to properly identify himself in front of the very corrections officers he was deceiving.
  2. We spent weeks talking about every possible eventuality, about everything that could happen, and that was the one thing we did not talk about,” Henry said.

The ensuing chaos — freaked-out producers whisper-yelling into their microphones, camera crews sprinting down hallways — made for one of the series’ most gripping installments. “When our Zac’s name was called to go to court, we couldn’t step in and say, ‘Whoa, whoa, whoa — cut, guys!’ We just had to let it play out because, again, if our Zac Holland gets pulled out,

people would know something wasn’t right,” Henry said. “It was terrifying when Zac is getting handcuffed to walk through outside, but that also let know that something pretty damn real is happening.” In the end, the officers themselves realized the mix-up before the mission was compromised. Socially speaking, many of the participants flourished behind bars — Zac and Barbra proved to be particularly popular — but others majorly struggled to fit in, like Robert and Jeff (who was punched by another inmate, causing him to quit).

While Tami falls into the latter grouping, she stuck it out for all 60 days, despite repeated conflicts and never truly finding her groove with the other inmates. “I think Tami the closest you get to what a true inmate experience is when you are stripped of everything you know of being normal and civil,” Henry said of her struggles, which included an incident where she, at her wit’s end, mimed hanging herself.

  1. Tami’s raw mental and emotional state also resulted in a series of odd statements where she implied to guards and other inmates that she didn’t belong behind bars and it would all make sense soon.
  2. We certainly weren’t happy to hear that,” Henry said.
  3. The inmate experience — having all freedom taken away from you and being put on a regimented schedule where you had no control — went against everything she ever did in law enforcement, everything she ever knew, and she started to lose herself in there.” While everyone was suspicious of Tami, who was the first woman to enter the jail, producers realized they couldn’t pull her out at the pre-planned release time for fear of exposing the entire program.

But, in the end, Henry also believes that Tami had “the most transformative ride of anybody.” “This is one of the most surprising things about this program: Nearly every person — we will hold aside one person — came out the other side fundamentally changed in their worldviews,” he said.

  • They were all really impacted by this in a way that I’ve never seen in anything.
  • When you make television, it always has an impact on people, but they came out the other side — and what’s strange is I think they all came out for the better.” Given the show’s secretive nature, a second season was filmed in the jail before the first began to air.

When the second group of volunteer inmates exited the program, it was then that Noel told his staff about the documentarians’ true intentions over the previous four months. And, according to Henry, very few were actually angry they’d been lied to. “The reaction in the room at the moment was actually pride,” he said.

  1. Pride that they were the place this had happened excitement over what was going to be learned.
  2. At first there was some concern that the sheriff did this as a ‘gotcha!’ — which was never the intention.
  3. Then they realized that this is a guy who cares enough about this facility and the way it runs to help us run it better.” And that goodwill has continued, now that the show is airing.
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“I was back at the facility five weeks ago and I was not getting mean stares. I was getting hellos and handshakes, and that for me is always the bar.” That sentiment extends beyond the jail’s walls and into the Jeffersonville community, which has embraced the show in a big way.

There has been a sense of ‘Thank you for caring enough to do this.’ Our biggest concern in all of this was how would it be received locally. A lot of people were very surprised when it first came out, but as the show has been airing, the local press has been really excited that it happened there. It’s been really well-received on the whole, locally.” One of the more prominent nonvolunteer inmates to be featured on the series was 20-year-old DiAundré, who befriended Robert when he first entered the cell.

Since his release, DiAundré has criticized the show’s editing, saying it’s misleading and events are shown out of context and out of order. “Timeline really mattered to us. We did our absolute best to stick to the timeline,” Henry said when he considered the criticism.

When you get into, things happen that are hard to explain in a way that people can make sense of. What we found is that editing, no matter what, is going to alter the absolute timeline.” Henry also recommends that critics take memory into account. “We ran into this with a lot of the participants as well — but when you take someone’s experience 24/7 and begin to edit it, it’s hard to remember how it all unfolded when you lived it,” he said.

“There are a couple of times where things are switched with, but it’s also in the service of trying to make sense of what exactly was happening in real time and that’s our biggest challenge. But over the totality of it, I would stand behind it and say this is all truthful to what the experience was as we saw it in the time we were there.

  1. From the outset, we really, really counseled everybody on the team that we don’t have control here.
  2. What we have control over is capturing and making sure we really hear and see everything.
  3. But what is going to happen, we just have to react to.” After every volunteer participant finished the program, each sat down with Noel and Capt.

Scottie Maples for a debrief about what they learned during their time inside. Yes, as viewers saw in the finale, Zac’s intel led to immediate raids and the discovery of contraband. But the influence of those 60 days on the jail hasn’t stopped there. “Maryum had some of the most valuable information for the sheriff,” Henry said.

“She said, ‘You’ve got Alcoholics Anonymous but 85% of those girls are users and all they are doing in your jail is detoxing — there are no programs tailored specifically to addicts of narcotics, so you need NA there.'” Every released inmate is also now given a card that contains phone numbers for crisis and help hotlines.

“What we saw is that people who had committed no crime, people who had never been incarcerated before, walked out of that facility and they had trouble sleeping, they had trouble setting a schedule for themselves. And if you don’t have a support system, are an addict, or have been in the system for a long time, those challenges are magnified a hundredfold,” Henry continued.

How big is Tony from 60 Days In?

A family man from a small southern town, Tony was attracted to the challenges and unpredictability of working in corrections. He has worked with some of the toughest criminals in Atlanta, and at 6’3″ tall and 250 lbs, this former college football star doesn’t scare easily.

Where is Matt from 60 Days In now?

He is currently working as an Adjunct Professor and Hospice Chaplain helping sick patients and their loved ones peacefully transition. Matt is also a former international level boxer and current MMA Trainer and believes he will be able to protect himself if a confrontation were to occur while inside the facility.

Asked By: Hayden Coleman Date: created: Apr 16 2023

Is 60 Days In real or fake

Answered By: Luke Walker Date: created: Apr 18 2023

Is ’60 Days In’ Real or Totally Scripted? Here’s What Fans Should Know > > How Much Do 60 Days In Participants Get Paid Source: A&E Viewers of ’60 Days In’ on A&E have a lot of questions about how legitimate the show is. Is it actually real or is it totally scripted? By Aug.18 2022, Published 3:11 p.m. ET Plenty of reality TV shows have raked in bad reputations for being scripted.

is a reality TV show that focuses on a group of individuals who work inside of a jail. They’ve been chosen to break down the build-up of gang violence, illegal substance usage, and corruption inside the facilities. Article continues below advertisement They have to try and fit in with other inmates by pretending to be felons.

Viewers of 60 Days In have a lot of questions about how legitimate the show is though. Is it actually real or is it totally scripted? How Much Do 60 Days In Participants Get Paid Source: A&E Article continues below advertisement According to one of the stars from 60 Days In, the show isn’t as real as you might think. Rob Holcomb told that the show’s creators heavily edited major scenes. He said, “The show is real, but the editing was fake. How Much Do 60 Days In Participants Get Paid Source: A&E Article continues below advertisement He went on to explain, “They tried to make it look like I was going to be attacked. The show made the inmates look like animals; in reality, they were kind human beings suffering from drug problems.” Rob also stated, “When you watch the show, you get the feeling inmates are bad people and you should be scared to go to jail.

In reality, many are respectable people who made poor decisions.” Rob’s experience filming 60 Days In is enough to make viewers question just how real the show is. It’s obvious that typical show creators do tons of editing to tell stories, but if a story is being overly edited, it takes away from the truth.

Article continues below advertisement How Much Do 60 Days In Participants Get Paid Source: A&E The supposed purpose of a show like 60 Days In is to help prison systems improve from the inside. The prison system is generally considered quite flawed, and a show like this is supposed to help create a major change. Contestants who are willing to go undercover for 60 days inside of a jail know that there might be some risky moments, but they’re willing to put themselves out there anyway.

Article continues below advertisement Before going to jail for 60 days, contestants have to learn the details of their fabricated criminal backgrounds in order to easily fit in with real inmates. Article continues below advertisement It might be surprising to learn that some of the most interesting moments on this show actually happened when the cameras were turned off.

According to, and assassination order was placed on an inmate while the show was being filmed. Since no one from the immediate cast was directly involved with the assassination order, the details weren’t added to any episodes. Season 7 of 60 Days In premieres on Thursday, Aug.18, 2022 on A&E.

Was Robert Faking 60 Days In?

How Fake Is 60 Days In? – Over the years, there have been a lot of entertainment industry secrets that have finally come out after years of remaining unknown to the masses. For example, even though most people who worked in Hollywood knew that a lot of stars were bad people, the general public was shocked by all the stars that were wrapped up in the #MeToo scandal,

  1. When it comes to 60 Days In, however, one of the show’s stars came forward with claims about the series almost immediately after the show debuted in 2016.
  2. Since A&E started as a channel that focused on serious programs about history, it seems clear that the network wouldn’t want its credibility challenged.

Unfortunately for the network, however, one of the people who starred in the first season of 60 Days In claimed that the show was deceptive. While 60 Days In first season star Robert Holcomb didn’t claim that anything seen on the show was faked, he claimed the series was very misleading due to the editing,

  • The show was real, but the editing was fake.
  • The inmates figured me out in two hours and they treated me like gold.
  • They were the nicest group of people I had been around my entire life.” “Random acts of kindness made jail comfortable.
  • They treated me better than my big brother!” As anyone who watched the first season of 60 Days In will no doubt remember, the show made it seem like Robert Holcomb was in serious danger from the real inmates.

According to what Holcomb went on to say about the show, however, that was totally faked in the editing process. “They tried to make it look like I was going to be attacked. The show made inmates look like animals; in reality, they were kind human beings suffering from drug problems.” Based on what Robert Holcomb had to say about his 60 Days In experience, it is hard to categorically call the show completely fake since he claims that everything seen on the show really happened.

Asked By: Jake Gonzales Date: created: Jun 21 2023

What was the worst jail in 60 Days In

Answered By: Peter Nelson Date: created: Jun 21 2023

1 Season Four – How Much Do 60 Days In Participants Get Paid A&E Season four was one of the best seasons for both the men and the women and premiered on January 1, 2018. This season was again filmed in Fulton County Jail in Atlanta, Georgia under Colonel Mark Adger. This season featured prison alcohol, different ways to get high, and a prison romance.

This season was also the first season to have one volunteer in two seasons with U.S. Marine Nate Burrell. Nate did so well during season three that producers asked if he would stay another 60 days. Unfortunately, Nate committed suicide in 2020, and it is unsure if this was another case of a reality show that destroyed someone’s life,

With no word yet on if 60 Days In will be returning for season eight, it will be exciting to see what A&E does next with one of its most entertaining reality TV shows,60 Days In is now available on A&E and Hulu.

Why was 60 Days In Cancelled?

What is the release date for 60 Days In Season 7? – How Much Do 60 Days In Participants Get Paid A&E While the first three seasons of “60 Days In” released at various times during the year, Season 4 through Season 6 have all premiered at the beginning of January, one per year from 2018 to 2020. January 2021 already came and went, and still there’s no “60 Days In” Season 7.

  1. A likely reason for the delay is the COVID-19 pandemic, which has greatly affected productions of all kinds.
  2. Reality shows are particularly tricky, especially in the case of this series.
  3. Many places were hit hard by the pandemic, but especially jails, as the institutions are generally overpacked with inefficient healthcare.

Considering this, it makes sense that the team behind “60 Days In” would want to put the show on hold until vaccinations are more widespread and the country has recovered. Possibly because of this factor or for another reason, A&E also hasn’t officially renewed or cancelled “60 Days In” yet, so there’s still no guarantee that a seventh season is even coming.

Is Beyond Scared Straight fake?

Nothing is scripted. The only thing that’s planned is which inmates get to talk to the punks. Usually, it’s ones that won’t actually try to kill them. The guards keep the most dangerous ones from actually acting on any impulses.

Asked By: Jose Bennett Date: created: Aug 30 2023

How long was Tony a prisoner

Answered By: Sebastian Patterson Date: created: Sep 02 2023

After Day 3: Federal prosecution – How Much Do 60 Days In Participants Get Paid Tony in FBI custody after Day 3 Facing the death penalty due to the fact he committed treason, Tony was vouched for by both President David Palmer and Jack Bauer, as Tony managed to be a huge help towards the end of Day 3, Tony received a reduced sentence and he only had to face seven months of jail time.

However, Tony was very withdrawn when he was released from prison and he had trouble opening to Michelle about his feelings. Eventually Tony became a bitter drunk, which ultimately drove Michelle away. Michelle filed for divorce and earned a position at Homeland Security Restructuring in Seattle, where she would work with Bill Buchanan,

When Michelle left him, Tony became even more bitter and refused to find a job. He also began a relationship with Jen Slater, a younger woman who had a job at a bar.

Asked By: Dylan Nelson Date: created: Oct 03 2023

Where is Rose from 60 Days In

Answered By: Eric Hall Date: created: Oct 05 2023

She helped over 20 inmates with their cases—some even had their charges dismissed with Rojonah’s help. Since her release, she has worked as an entrepreneur and volunteers her document-preparation services to formerly incarcerated people.

Asked By: Aaron Butler Date: created: Mar 25 2024

Why did Jeff leave 60 Days In

Answered By: Devin Parker Date: created: Mar 28 2024

In Thursday’s episode of ’60 Days In,’ Jeff, the mall security guard who volunteered to stay undercover at the Clark County jail for 60 days, exits the show early after getting ‘sucker punched’ by an inmate.

Asked By: Sean Collins Date: created: Jul 20 2023

What happened to Michelle from 60 Days In

Answered By: Edward Price Date: created: Jul 21 2023

Season 3 cast –

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  • Mark Adger, colonel at the Jail in
  • Calvin Crosby, a special education teacher at a local Public School. He hopes he will be able to relate to his students on a deeper level and he thinks it may shock them into changing their own behaviors and patterns.
  • Don (last name unknown) grew up in the projects of Newark, Delaware. His father and two brothers were all in and out of prison during his youth. As a convicted felon, his father could never find a job, so he continually returned to selling and using drugs. Don believes that the system has failed African Americans. He wants to join the program in order to uncover discrimination, unite the inmates, and learn how to actively fight recidivism and the escalating trends of convicted black men in America.
  • Gerson (last name unknown) moved from El Salvador to California when he was seven years old. He went from a civil war to a gang war, living in the Los Angeles area during the 1980s and 90s. He eventually left California and moved to the east coast as he worked to escape the risk of becoming a statistic by his surroundings, including gangs, drugs, and violence. He works as a mentor in schools, colleges and universities. When the program started, Gerson had concerns about it. He called the producer, met him at a hotel, and decided not risk it.
  • Jessica Speigner-Page met her husband on an inmate pen pal site, and she was shocked at how institutionalized he was when he was released. After a decade behind bars, he was struggling to reintegrate. His “inmate-like” behavior has been a strain on their relationship. Speigner-Page is determined to understand where these behaviors and instincts of his come from in order to help him, and others who have been recently released, reintegrate into society. She believes this program will help her relate to her husband and strengthen their marriage. However, she left the program early.
  • Jon McAdams, a veteran and former law enforcement agent who became disenchanted with the system and now wants to dedicate his professional life to civil rights activism. He plans on starting a nonprofit organization in his conservative town. He wants to “walk the walk” and put his words into action, starting by living among a population he once put behind bars but now wants to serve.
  • Matt Michael served in the Marine Corps for four years. He was the honor graduate in his boot camp class, was promoted quickly, and ultimately attained the rank of Sergeant (E-5) in the infantry. He supports law enforcement, but he thinks the system needs a reality check. He believes if one has committed a serious crime, they should do their time.
  • Mauri Jackson worked three years as a correctional officer in a men’s maximum security facility. As CO, she was shocked by how many incarcerated men and women suffer from mental illness and are on medications while serving out their time behind bars. She is determined to be part of the solution when it comes to prison reform and mental health.
  • Michelle Polley is currently working in property management, but has been interested in the criminal justice field all her life. She has taken various classes on criminal justice and criminal law. She hopes to connect with women inside through creating positive activities so they know there is more to life than four concrete walls.
  • Nate Burrell served in active duty in the United States Marine Corps from 2006 to 2010 in the infantry, and completed two combat tours in Iraq. He served for three years in the reserves, and was honorably discharged in 2013. Subsequently, he received his associate degree in criminal justice and law enforcement in 2014 in order to become a fish and wildlife officer in, He decided to remain in custody for an additional 60 days when Colonel Adger offered him the opportunity to do so.
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    Who broke the cover in 60 days Season 5?

    Her Cover (Season 5 Flashback) | A&E. Binge all 6 seasons for free here! https://play.aetv.

    Who is Zac in 60 Days In?

    Zac Baker – How Much Do 60 Days In Participants Get Paid Zac Baker took part in the first ever series of 60 Days In (Image: A&E) Army veteran Zac Baker became one of the stand out stars of 60 Days In series one, after he successfully uncovered a drug smuggling ring within the prison. He has since revealed to People Magazine that he has had offers of employment from law enforcement agencies following his stint on 60 Days In, saying: “I’ve had police departments reach out to me for employment. How Much Do 60 Days In Participants Get Paid Zac Baker regularly shares insights into his life on social media (Image: whiskey_tango_foxtrot_zulu/ Instagram) He is not the only member of his family to have appeared on 60 Days In however, as his wife Ashleigh was also a participant in series two.

    1. Ashleigh entered the series to help women struggling with addiction, but during her time on the series, she could be heard arguing with husband Zac on the phone.
    2. The couple, who have two sons called Gavin and Ryker, are still together and Daily Express reported that Ashleigh addressed the way their arguments were portrayed on the series in an Instagram post.

    She wrote: “Unfortunately, this season of the show was extremely edited toward dramatic effect. What looked like one phone call per episode was really MAYBE two phone calls chopped and edited so many times, it’s sad.” Like her husband Zac, Ashleigh also posts about health and fitness on social media.

    Asked By: Daniel Perez Date: created: Feb 21 2023

    Was 60 Days In Cancelled

    Answered By: Charles Bennett Date: created: Feb 21 2023

    “60 Days In” Returns for a New Season Followed by New Series “Inmate to Roommate” on Thursday, August 18 on A&E New groundbreaking documentary series, “Inmate to Roommate,” follows recently released inmates as they re-enter society and move in with everyday people who are welcoming them into their homes.

    SEVEN EX-CONVICTS GO UNDERCOVER IN GEORGIA’S HENRY COUNTY JAIL TO IDENTIFY ISSUES WITHIN THE FACILITY WHEN A&E’S HIT SERIES “60 DAYS IN” RETURNS FOR A NEW SEASON PREMIERING THURSDAY, AUGUST 18 AT 9PM ET/PT FOLLOWING AT 10PM ET/PT, NEW SERIES “INMATE TO ROOMMATE” SPOTLIGHTS FORMER CONVICTS AS THEY ARE RELEASED FROM PRISON, RE-ENTER SOCIETY AND MOVE IN WITH PEOPLE THEY BARELY KNOW New York, NY – July 1, 2022 – A&E Network announces the return of hit series “60 Days In” for a highly anticipated 7th season kicking off on Thursday, August 18 at 9pm ET/PT.

    For the first time in series history, seven formerly incarcerated citizens will voluntarily go behind bars at the Henry County Jail in McDonough, Georgia to help pinpoint the problems and assist the new Sheriff with a reconnaissance mission in the facility.

    Directly following at 10pm ET/PT is the new series, “Inmate to Roommate” chronicling the stories of six ex-convicts as they are released from prison and move in with people they barely know for a second chance at life on the outside. “As a Network, we pride ourselves on being able to provide our viewers with raw programming that provides an unfiltered look at the world,” said Elaine Frontain Bryant, EVP and Head of Programming, A&E Network.

    “With access like never before, these two series expose different facets of the criminal justice system and are a tremendous addition to our slate of robust storytelling projects.” “60 Days In” – New season premieres Thursday, August 18 at 9pm ET/PT Returning for an all-new season, “60 Days In” locks down Henry County Jail in Georgia just outside of Atlanta which can house approximately 800 inmates.

    • The recently elected Sheriff Reginald Scandrett, who came in on a platform of improving the jail and reducing recidivism, is enlisting seven formerly incarcerated participants to go undercover in an effort to find valuable information to help improve jail conditions.
    • For the first time in the series’ history, all participants have previously been arrested for crimes of their own and collectively have served more than 40 years behind bars.

    Will these formerly incarcerated participants be able to survive everything thrown their way during the voluntary stint in jail or will the challenges of going back behind bars be too much for them to handle? “Inmate to Roommate” – New series premieres Thursday, August 18 at 10pm ET/PT New groundbreaking documentary series, “Inmate to Roommate,” follows recently released inmates as they re-enter society and move in with everyday people who are welcoming them into their homes.

    This practice has been the subject of re-entry programs aimed at stopping recidivism. America has one of the world’s highest recidivism rates with approximately 76% of released prisoners being re-arrested after 5 years. One of the most significant factors in reducing recidivism rates is access to housing.

    Both the former inmates and their respective roommates will enter this this new living arrangement with their own baggage. The opportunities and the challenges are complex as they each face scrutiny from friends and family questioning their motives. Will this new situation allow the formerly incarcerated to successfully re-enter society or will it be the worst decision both parties have ever made? *Join the conversation by following @AETV and using #60DaysIn & #InmateToRoommate* “60 Days In” and “Inmate to Roommate” will be available on demand and to stream on the A&E app and aetv.com For more information on these series please visit https://www.aetv.com/shows/60-days-in & https://www.aetv.com/shows/inmate-to-roommate “60 Days In” is produced by Lucky 8 for A&E Network.

    Executive producers for Lucky 8 are Greg Henry, George Kralovansky, Isaac Holub, Kim Woodard and Mike Colon. Executive producers for A&E are Elaine Frontain Bryant, Shelly Tatro and Brad Holcman. A+E Networks holds worldwide distribution rights to “60 Days In.” “Inmate to Roommate” is produced by Sharp Entertainment, a part of Sony Pictures Television, for A&E Network.

    Executive producers for Sharp Entertainment are Matt Sharp, Dan Adler and Laura Korkoian with Joseph Ruzer as Co-EP. Executive producers for A&E are Elaine Frontain Bryant, Shelly Tatro and Jonathan Partridge. A+E Networks holds worldwide distribution rights to “Inmate to Roommate.” About A&E Network A&E leads the cultural conversation through high-quality, original programming that captivates viewers and brings them to the heart of the stories that matter.

    Through its distinctive brand of award-winning non-fiction and documentary programming, A&E always makes entertainment an art. For more press information and photography, please visit us at press.aenetworks.com. Website: aetv.com | Twitter: @aetv | Facebook: aetv | Instagram: @aetv | TikTok: @aetv About Lucky 8 TV LUCKY 8 TV is an unscripted film and television production company launched in 2014 by veteran producers and partners Kim Woodard, Greg Henry, Isaac Holub and George Kralovansky, whose combined skills fill the spectrum from blue-chip documentary to access-driven journalism.

    Series and specials include the groundbreaking and award-winning 60 Days In for A&E, Jane Goodall: The Hope for National Geographic, and The Food That Built America for History. Other recent content includes Panama’s Animal Highway for Smithsonian, To Catch A Smuggler for National Geographic, and several Shark Week specials for Discovery Channel.

    About Sharp Entertainment Sharp Entertainment, a part of Sony Pictures Television, is one of the biggest creative powerhouses in unscripted television today. Led by producer Matt Sharp since 2003, Sharp Ent has created and delivered thousands of hours of programming and unparalleled ratings achievement across multiple networks, including WE’s “Love After Lockup,” Travel Channel’s “Man V.

    Food,” Nat Geo’s “Doomsday Preppers,” TLC’s “Extreme Couponing” and the mega-franchise, “90 Day Fiancé.”

    What did Ricky from 60 Days In do?

    A 26-year old Orleans Parish jail inmate who died last week in his cell had recently asked to see a psychiatrist, but was ignored, according to two inmates on the man’s tier. Ricky Russell, awaiting trial for allegedly choking and beating to death an elderly woman last summer, was found unresponsive early Thursday morning by sheriff’s deputies.

    • A prisoner who was held on the same protective custody tier as Russell told the Southern Poverty Law Center that Russell was told by nurses to file a request for a “sick call” visit.
    • I remember him saying ‘I’m tired.
    • I’m tired of this,'” according to a sworn statement by Jaime Hernandez filed into the court record on Thursday as part of a brief in the case.

    Anthony Groves, an inmate who spoke to NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune and who was held in the cell across from Russell, also recalled that Russell asked to see the psychiatrist. Russell was given as many as 60 pills at one time, to be taken according to a schedule, Groves said.

    Hernandez believed Russell received 45 pills of Depakote and Wellbutrin, drugs prescribed to people with psychiatric disorders, every other Wednesday. Instead of taking them on his prescribed schedule, Russell often would sell the pills or give them away, Hernandez said in the statement. “I just can’t believe the way they distribute medication,” Groves said.

    Russell’s death is under investigation by the sheriff’s office, as well as the Orleans Parish coroner. John Gagliano, the chief investigator for the coroner’s office, said any ruling on what caused Russell to die will have to wait until toxicology results are available.

    1. That often takes weeks, as the coroner’s toxicology work is performed by a laboratory in St. Louis.
    2. A statement issued by Orleans Parish Sheriff Marlin Gusman’s office last week noted that Russell was the first inmate to die at a New Orleans jail facility since August 2011.
    3. The New Orleans Police Department was notified about the death, the release stated.

    On Thursday, Gusman’s office issued a statement by Dr. Samuel Gore, the jail’s medical director, that emphasized Russell’s frequent mental health treatment in the facility. “During the first portion of his incarceration (which began June 2012), inmate Russell voiced suicidal thoughts and depression relating to his charges and inability to contact his family,” Gore said.

    But Russell responded to treatment and was eventually taken off suicide watch. “At his most recent visit to the mental health staff, less than a week before his death, inmate Russell was in ‘good spirits,’ voiced satisfaction with his medication changes, and denied suicidal ideation,” Gore said. The 2009 U.S.

    Department of Justice investigation of the jail, often called Orleans Parish Prison, blasted the facility’s “keep on person” policy regarding medications. Under the policy, the report said, inmates receive packets with four days’ worth of medication twice a week, which the Justice Department said is out of step with standard practices.

    The report says the policy was a factor in at least three non-fatal overdoses in 2008 and 2007. A proposed consent decree that will mandate changes at the jail says the sheriff’s office will maintain “medication administration protocols that prevent misuse, overdose, theft or violence related to medication.” But the proposal does not specifically outlaw “keep on person” policies.

    The decree, however, would require the jail to produce a regular report on the number of inmates given medications in this way, as well as the number prescribed psychotropic medications and treated for medicine-related problems. In his statement, Gore defended the medication policy, saying it is employed by jails across the country.

    Only inmates deemed to be “clinically stable” are allowed to administer their own medicine, he said. Mental health care at the jail has been repeatedly criticized in federal investigations, as well as by the Southern Poverty Law Center, which last year filed a class-action lawsuit that has led to the proposed consent decree.

    The U.S. Department of Justice, Gusman and the law center have all signed off on the proposed decree. But Mayor Mitch Landrieu has balked, saying Gusman and the federal agency are demanding too much money to fix the jail when it is not clear any problems are the result of insufficient funding.

    A hearing will be held in April, at which U.S. District Court Judge Lance Africk will determine whether conditions at the jail are unconstitutional and if the consent decree is justified. Criminal District Court filings show that Russell’s attorneys had his mental competency to stand trial evaluated after his arrest.

    A forensic psychiatrist wrote the judge in the case twice last year, saying Russell is competent, but noting that he takes Wellbutrin for “what he describes as ‘my bipolar’ disorder.'” On his current medications, Russell appeared “well-stabilized,” wrote Dr.

    Rafael Salcedo. Russell described for the doctor a “fairly extensive history of psychiatric behavioral problems consistent with his having been raised in the foster care system,” according to one letter. Salcedo wrote that Russell may have been suffering from bipolar disorder or schizoaffective disorder based on the anti-psychotic medications and mood stabilizers the inmate said he’d taken in the past.

    In a statement released last Thursday by Gusman’s office, the jail confirmed that Russell was held in a cell by himself at the Conchetta building on Tulane Avenue. While there were “no signs of violence” on Russell’s body, the jail and Orleans Parish coroner are looking at whether his death could be accidental, a suicide or the result of a medication reaction, the office stated in a release.

    1. The office also said that Russell regularly received medical attention, including evaluations of his mental health and any “suicidal tendencies.” Because he was housed in protective custody, Russell was evaluated by nurses three times a week, Gore said.
    2. Both Groves and Hernandez indicated no guards made rounds on the tier between the nighttime count on Wednesday last week and when Russell was found the next morning.
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    The sheriff’s initial release noted that Russell’s unresponsive body was found during the breakfast roll call. In the Thursday statement, Gore said the sheriff’s preliminary review showed a deputy was on the floor overnight and a supervisor also checked in on the tier.

    • In his declaration, Hernandez recalled Russell staying up late into the night, “laughing really hard throughout the night.” “He said he was high and seeing things in his cell,” Hernandez said.
    • Russell stopped laughing around 2 a.m.
    • Groves said Russell appeared troubled by the crime he was accused of: killing 74-year-old Lorraine Langlois, the caretaker at an unlicensed group home in Gentilly.

    Police said Langlois was struck on the head with an air-conditioning unit and strangled with a plastic bag. “He really was haunted by his crime,” Groves said. Staff writer Claire Galofaro contributed to this report.

    Did Ms Richardson get fired?

    Discover videos related to How did maddie richardson teacher get fired on TikTok. A #Texas substitute teacher was fired after allegedly encouraging students to fight each other in their classroom, the school district said.

    Has anyone on 60 Days In died?

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    Television

    Published Nov 01, 2020 • 1 minute read How Much Do 60 Days In Participants Get Paid Nate Burrell is pictured in a recent posted on Instagram. Photo by Nate Burrell / Instagram Reviews and recommendations are unbiased and products are independently selected. Postmedia may earn an affiliate commission from purchases made through links on this page.U.S.

    Reality TV star Nate Burrell has died after taking his own life. The 60 Days In participant committed suicide on Saturday night, according to his sister, Chelsey Walker. She tells TMZ Nate shot and killed himself after posting a long suicide note on Facebook, in which he wrote: “This isn’t an admission of guilt.

    I’m just tired, I’ve been through so much in my life, the pain of my situation now hurts more than I ever imagined. I can’t keep going on.” The 33-year-old recently split from his pregnant wife. Sign up to receive daily headline news from the Calgary Herald, a division of Postmedia Network Inc. By clicking on the sign up button you consent to receive the above newsletter from Postmedia Network Inc. You may unsubscribe any time by clicking on the unsubscribe link at the bottom of our emails or any newsletter.

    Is Desmond from 60 Days In still alive?

    Police confirm escaped inmate Desmond Louis has died

    Lake Charles, LA (KPLC) – Louisiana State Police have confirmed that escaped inmate Desmond Louis has died following a shootout with law enforcement Thursday afternoon.The search for Louis ended with the suspect being shot on 11th Street in Lake Charles Thursday afternoon.About two hours after Calcasieu Parish Sheriff Tony Mancuso and Beauregard Parish Sheriff Mark Herford held a news conference giving an update on the search for Desmond Louis, law enforcement surrounded a home on 11th Street, near Golf Street.Mancuso said Louis came out of the home shooting, officers returned fire, and Louis was shot.

    “We obviously tried to negotiate with him to get him to come out on his own,” Mancuso said. “We were able to get three others to come out of the house. We tried to tear gas him. That didn’t work. He ended up starting to shoot at us. Even our armored vehicle has shots where you can tell he shot at us.” The three others inside the home are now in custody, Mancuso said. How Much Do 60 Days In Participants Get Paid Inmate Desmond Louis is accused of walking off a job in Lake Charles. Louis was last seen in orange shorts and no shirt after walking off a job site at Cancun Restaurant on Ryan Street in Lake Charles between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. Monday, according to Paul Perkins with Louisiana Workforce, LLC.

    DOC) Wednesday night at approximately 9 p.m., Calcasieu Parish Sheriff’s Office detectives received information revealing Louis was live on social media, said Kayla Vincent of the Calcasieu Parish Sheriff’s Office. Detectives began viewing the social media feed and observed Louis to be travelling as a passenger in a car on Highway 171, Vincent said.

    CPSO detectives began searching for Louis on Highway 171 and pulled onto the shoulder in an attempt to locate Louis. A fully marked CPSO patrol unit observed what he believed to be the car Louis was in traveling on Highway 171 near Cobb Circle in Moss Bluff.

    1. The deputy activated his lights and siren in to initiate a traffic stop, Vincent said.
    2. The driver, later learned to be a 16-year-old juvenile, pulled over in front of the detective’s unit, Vincent said.
    3. CPSO detectives exited the vehicle, at which time Louis began shooting at detectives, causing detectives to fire back.

    No injuries were sustained during the gunfire. The car fled the scene at which time a pursuit ensued and the driver ultimately pulled over near Jillian Drive in Beauregard Parish. It was learned Louis fled the car prior to the driver stopping, Vincent said.

    Two passengers in the car, Keasia J. Wilfred, 19, Lake Charles, who is the owner of the car, and Dannirriah Louis, 19, Lake Charles, were arrested and booked into the Beauregard Parish Jail and transported to the Calcasieu Correctional Center, Vincent said. They are both charged with 2 counts of principal to attempted first degree murder and accessory after the fact to simple escape.

    Their bonds are still pending. How Much Do 60 Days In Participants Get Paid Keasia Wilfred (left) and Dannirriah Louis (right) (Calcasieu Parish Sheriff’s Office) Louis was convicted of illegal use of a dangerous weapon in January 2020, Vincent said. He was also convicted of possession of a firearm by a convicted felon, obstruction of justice, and illegal carrying of a weapon in April 2020.

    Asked By: Ashton Anderson Date: created: May 20 2023

    What is Abner’s backstory on 60 Days In

    Answered By: Martin Mitchell Date: created: May 23 2023

    Abner grew up in a major urban area surrounded by poverty and crime. From a young age, he understood the dynamics of the streets and ultimately found his identity there. After joining a gang as a teenager, Abner started down a path of crime that he regrets to this day.

    Asked By: Jonathan Alexander Date: created: Jul 10 2023

    Is 60 days 6 months

    Answered By: Gordon Walker Date: created: Jul 12 2023

    60 days is equivalent to: 1.935 months.

    Why was 60 Days In Cancelled?

    What is the release date for 60 Days In Season 7? – How Much Do 60 Days In Participants Get Paid A&E While the first three seasons of “60 Days In” released at various times during the year, Season 4 through Season 6 have all premiered at the beginning of January, one per year from 2018 to 2020. January 2021 already came and went, and still there’s no “60 Days In” Season 7.

    • A likely reason for the delay is the COVID-19 pandemic, which has greatly affected productions of all kinds.
    • Reality shows are particularly tricky, especially in the case of this series.
    • Many places were hit hard by the pandemic, but especially jails, as the institutions are generally overpacked with inefficient healthcare.

    Considering this, it makes sense that the team behind “60 Days In” would want to put the show on hold until vaccinations are more widespread and the country has recovered. Possibly because of this factor or for another reason, A&E also hasn’t officially renewed or cancelled “60 Days In” yet, so there’s still no guarantee that a seventh season is even coming.

    Asked By: Richard Thomas Date: created: Aug 08 2023

    Is there camera crew in 60 Days In

    Answered By: Isaiah Sanders Date: created: Aug 10 2023

    A camera man follows you around during the day and 2 night vision cameras are set up constantly recording all night. It’s not scripted and you don’t receive help unless it’s a medical issue and a medic is kept within a mile radius and can take some time to get to your location.

    What did Ricky from 60 Days In do?

    A 26-year old Orleans Parish jail inmate who died last week in his cell had recently asked to see a psychiatrist, but was ignored, according to two inmates on the man’s tier. Ricky Russell, awaiting trial for allegedly choking and beating to death an elderly woman last summer, was found unresponsive early Thursday morning by sheriff’s deputies.

    A prisoner who was held on the same protective custody tier as Russell told the Southern Poverty Law Center that Russell was told by nurses to file a request for a “sick call” visit. “I remember him saying ‘I’m tired. I’m tired of this,'” according to a sworn statement by Jaime Hernandez filed into the court record on Thursday as part of a brief in the case.

    Anthony Groves, an inmate who spoke to NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune and who was held in the cell across from Russell, also recalled that Russell asked to see the psychiatrist. Russell was given as many as 60 pills at one time, to be taken according to a schedule, Groves said.

    • Hernandez believed Russell received 45 pills of Depakote and Wellbutrin, drugs prescribed to people with psychiatric disorders, every other Wednesday.
    • Instead of taking them on his prescribed schedule, Russell often would sell the pills or give them away, Hernandez said in the statement.
    • I just can’t believe the way they distribute medication,” Groves said.

    Russell’s death is under investigation by the sheriff’s office, as well as the Orleans Parish coroner. John Gagliano, the chief investigator for the coroner’s office, said any ruling on what caused Russell to die will have to wait until toxicology results are available.

    That often takes weeks, as the coroner’s toxicology work is performed by a laboratory in St. Louis. A statement issued by Orleans Parish Sheriff Marlin Gusman’s office last week noted that Russell was the first inmate to die at a New Orleans jail facility since August 2011. The New Orleans Police Department was notified about the death, the release stated.

    On Thursday, Gusman’s office issued a statement by Dr. Samuel Gore, the jail’s medical director, that emphasized Russell’s frequent mental health treatment in the facility. “During the first portion of his incarceration (which began June 2012), inmate Russell voiced suicidal thoughts and depression relating to his charges and inability to contact his family,” Gore said.

    But Russell responded to treatment and was eventually taken off suicide watch. “At his most recent visit to the mental health staff, less than a week before his death, inmate Russell was in ‘good spirits,’ voiced satisfaction with his medication changes, and denied suicidal ideation,” Gore said. The 2009 U.S.

    Department of Justice investigation of the jail, often called Orleans Parish Prison, blasted the facility’s “keep on person” policy regarding medications. Under the policy, the report said, inmates receive packets with four days’ worth of medication twice a week, which the Justice Department said is out of step with standard practices.

    The report says the policy was a factor in at least three non-fatal overdoses in 2008 and 2007. A proposed consent decree that will mandate changes at the jail says the sheriff’s office will maintain “medication administration protocols that prevent misuse, overdose, theft or violence related to medication.” But the proposal does not specifically outlaw “keep on person” policies.

    The decree, however, would require the jail to produce a regular report on the number of inmates given medications in this way, as well as the number prescribed psychotropic medications and treated for medicine-related problems. In his statement, Gore defended the medication policy, saying it is employed by jails across the country.

    Only inmates deemed to be “clinically stable” are allowed to administer their own medicine, he said. Mental health care at the jail has been repeatedly criticized in federal investigations, as well as by the Southern Poverty Law Center, which last year filed a class-action lawsuit that has led to the proposed consent decree.

    The U.S. Department of Justice, Gusman and the law center have all signed off on the proposed decree. But Mayor Mitch Landrieu has balked, saying Gusman and the federal agency are demanding too much money to fix the jail when it is not clear any problems are the result of insufficient funding.

    1. A hearing will be held in April, at which U.S.
    2. District Court Judge Lance Africk will determine whether conditions at the jail are unconstitutional and if the consent decree is justified.
    3. Criminal District Court filings show that Russell’s attorneys had his mental competency to stand trial evaluated after his arrest.

    A forensic psychiatrist wrote the judge in the case twice last year, saying Russell is competent, but noting that he takes Wellbutrin for “what he describes as ‘my bipolar’ disorder.'” On his current medications, Russell appeared “well-stabilized,” wrote Dr.

    Rafael Salcedo. Russell described for the doctor a “fairly extensive history of psychiatric behavioral problems consistent with his having been raised in the foster care system,” according to one letter. Salcedo wrote that Russell may have been suffering from bipolar disorder or schizoaffective disorder based on the anti-psychotic medications and mood stabilizers the inmate said he’d taken in the past.

    In a statement released last Thursday by Gusman’s office, the jail confirmed that Russell was held in a cell by himself at the Conchetta building on Tulane Avenue. While there were “no signs of violence” on Russell’s body, the jail and Orleans Parish coroner are looking at whether his death could be accidental, a suicide or the result of a medication reaction, the office stated in a release.

    1. The office also said that Russell regularly received medical attention, including evaluations of his mental health and any “suicidal tendencies.” Because he was housed in protective custody, Russell was evaluated by nurses three times a week, Gore said.
    2. Both Groves and Hernandez indicated no guards made rounds on the tier between the nighttime count on Wednesday last week and when Russell was found the next morning.

    The sheriff’s initial release noted that Russell’s unresponsive body was found during the breakfast roll call. In the Thursday statement, Gore said the sheriff’s preliminary review showed a deputy was on the floor overnight and a supervisor also checked in on the tier.

    • In his declaration, Hernandez recalled Russell staying up late into the night, “laughing really hard throughout the night.” “He said he was high and seeing things in his cell,” Hernandez said.
    • Russell stopped laughing around 2 a.m.
    • Groves said Russell appeared troubled by the crime he was accused of: killing 74-year-old Lorraine Langlois, the caretaker at an unlicensed group home in Gentilly.

    Police said Langlois was struck on the head with an air-conditioning unit and strangled with a plastic bag. “He really was haunted by his crime,” Groves said. Staff writer Claire Galofaro contributed to this report.