Asked By: Jordan Gray Date: created: Apr 28 2023

When is the best time to insert Cyclogest

Answered By: Jaden Wood Date: created: May 01 2023

Cyclogest 400mg pessaries The Patient Information Leaflet (PIL) is the leaflet included in the pack with a medicine. It is written for patients and gives information about taking or using a medicine. It is possible that the leaflet in your medicine pack may differ from this version because it may have been updated since your medicine was packaged.

Below is a text only representation of the Patient Information Leaflet. The original leaflet can be viewed using the link above. The text only version may be available in large print, Braille or audio CD. For further information call emc accessibility on 0800 198 5000. The product code(s) for this leaflet is: PL 02343/0006.

cyclogest ® 400mg pessary Micronised Progesterone Cyclogest is the registered trademark of L.D. Collins & Co. Ltd.

  • Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again.
  • If you have any further questions, ask your doctor, pharmacist or nurse.
  • This medicine has been prescribed for you. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their signs of illness are the same as yours.
  • If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This includes any possible side effects not listed in this leaflet. See section 4.
  • 1 What Cyclogest is and what it is used for 2 What you need to know before you use Cyclogest 3 How to use Cyclogest 4 Possible side effects 5 How to store Cyclogest
  • 6 Contents of the pack and other information

Cyclogest contains micronised progesterone which is a natural, female sex hormone, produced in the body. Cyclogest works by adjusting the hormonal balance within the body for the treatment of:

  • pre-menstrual syndrome which often affects women during the 7 to 10 days before their monthly period. The symptoms of pre-menstrual syndrome include feelings of tension, irritability, depression, headache, breast tenderness, weight gain and bloatedness
  • post-natal depression which some women get after their baby has been born.
  • women who need extra progesterone while undergoing treatment in an Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) programme.
  • are allergic to progesterone or any of the other ingredients of this medicine (listed in section 6),
  • have unusual vaginal bleeding that has not been evaluated by the doctor,
  • have known or suspected tumour that is hormone sensitive,
  • have porphyria disorders (a group of inherited or acquired disorders of certain enzymes),
  • have or have had blood clots in the legs, lungs, eyes or elsewhere in the body,
  • currently have or have had severe liver problems.
  • have a miscarriage and your physician suspects some tissue is still in the uterus or pregnancy outside of the womb.

Talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse before using Cyclogest. Take special care and tell your doctor straight away if you experience any of these symptoms during treatment or even few days after the last dosage:

  • pains in the calves or chest, a sudden shortness of breath or coughing blood indicating possible clots in the legs, heart, or lungs
  • severe headache or vomiting, dizziness, faintness, or changes in vision or speech, weakness or numbness of an arm or leg indicating possible clots in the brain or eye
  • worsening of depression

Check with your doctor or pharmacist before using Cyclogest if you have or ever have had:

  • liver problems such as jaundice (yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes).
  • epilepsy
  • migraine
  • asthma
  • cardiac or renal dysfunction
  • diabetes

There is no relevant use of Cyclogest in children. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking, have recently taken or might take any other medicines. This is especially important in case you are taking carbamazepine (e.g. to prevent fits, treat certain type of pain or mood disorders), rifampicin (to treat infections) or phenytoin (e.g.

  1. Cyclogest can be used during the first trimester of pregnancy for women who need extra progesterone while undergoing treatment in an Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) programme.
  2. The risks of congenital (conditions present at birth) anomalies, including genital abnormalities in male or female infants, from exposure to exogenous progesterone during pregnancy have not been fully established.
  3. For other use, if you are pregnant, think you may be pregnant or are planning to have a baby, ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice before using this medicine.
  4. This medicine should not be used during breast feeding.

Always use this medicine exactly as your doctor has told you. Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure. For women undergoing Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) programme : The recommended dose is 400 mg twice a day by vaginal insertion,

  • For the treatment of premenstrual syndrome and post-natal depression :
  • The recommended dose is 200 mg once a day or 400 mg twice a day by vaginal or rectal insertion,
  • The pessary may be inserted into either the vagina or rectum (back passage) depending upon the following certain other conditions.
  • You should insert Cyclogest into the:
  • vagina if you have:
    • colitis (inflammation of the colon causing frequent attacks of diarrhoea with mucous or blood)
    • problems controlling your bowel movements (faecal incontinence).
  • rectum (back passage) if you have:
    • a vaginal infection (discharge from your vagina)
    • or often have cystitis (a burning pain on passing water)
    • recently given birth
    • to use a barrier method of birth control such as a diaphragm, cap or condom. Such devices may not work properly in the presence of the hard fat from the pessary.

For premenstrual tension start using Cyclogest on day 12 or 14 of your menstrual cycle. This can be planned and marked onto your calendar; day 1 is the first day of your monthly period, counting forward to day 12 or 14 as advised by your doctor. Do not swallow Cyclogest. Always wash your hands before and after inserting the pessary. To insert into the:

  • Vagina – place the pessary between the lips of the vagina and push the pessary upwards and backwards. You may find it easier to do this if you are lying down or squatting.
  • Rectum (back passage) – gently push the pessary into the rectum for about one inch. Your muscles will hold the pessary in place when it is in far enough. Squeeze your buttocks together for a few seconds.

If you (or someone else) has accidentally swallowed any of the pessaries or you use too many, contact your nearest hospital casualty department or your doctor immediately for advice. If you forget to insert a pessary, do so as soon as you remember, unless it is nearly time for the next dose.

Never use two doses together. Remember to use the remaining doses at the correct time. Please consult your doctor or pharmacist for advice if you intend to stop or have stopped using Cyclogest. Abrupt discontinuation of progesterone dosing may cause increased anxiety, moodiness, and increased sensibility to seizures.

If you have any further questions on the use of this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Like all medicines, this medicine can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them. Stop using Cyclogest and contact your doctor at once if you have an allergic reaction.

  1. Common (may affect up to 1 in 10 people)
  2. Drowsiness, stomach discomfort or pain, breast pain
  3. Not known (frequency cannot be estimated from the available data)
  4. Diarrhoea, soreness in your rectum (back passage), flatulence (wind), changes in your menstrual cycle (you may find that your monthly period will start earlier than usual or it may be delayed), leakage after the pessary has dissolved (this is quite normal when using medicines that are inserted into the vagina or rectum)
  5. Adverse reactions in patients undergoing ART treatment is presented below:
  6. Common side effects (may affect up to 1 in 10 people):
  • Abdominal distension (swelling in the abdomen), abdominal pain, constipation
  • Sleepiness
  • Tiredness
  • Hot flush
  • Breast pain

Uncommon side effects (may affect up to 1 in 100 people):

  • Headache, dizziness, mood changes
  • Change in taste, vomiting, flatulence (wind), diarrhoea, bloat (gastric dilatation), rectal tumour
  • Night sweats, skin rash or itching
  • Joint pain
  • Pelvic pain, ovarian enlargement, vaginal bleeding
  • Frequent urination, involuntary excretion of urine
  • Weight increase
  • Bleeding
  • Itching at the application site, feeling cold or body temperature change or general discomfort

If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This includes any possible side effects not listed in this leaflet. You can also report side effects directly via the Yellow Card Scheme at: www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard or via the Yellow Card app, which can be downloaded from the Apple App Store, or Google Play Store,

  • Do not throw away any medicines via wastewater or household waste.
  • Ask your pharmacist how to throw away medicines you no longer use.
  • These measures will help protect the environment.
  • The active substance (the ingredient that makes the medicine work) is micronised progesterone. Each pessary contains 400 mg of the active Ingredient.
  • The other ingredients are hard fat.

Cyclogest are off-white, torpedo-shaped pessaries. Pack sizes are 15.L.D. Collins & Co. Ltd.1st FloorGallery Court28 Arcadia AvenueLondonN3 2FGUK Accord-UK Ltd.BarnstapleEX32 8NSUK

  1. This leaflet was last revised in March 2022.
  2. Further Information:
  3. Premenstrual Syndrome

Many women suffer from a condition called premenstrual syndrome or PMS. This is commonly known as PMT (premenstrual tension) because of the anxiety and bad temper often associated with it. However, there are many other symptoms that occur with PMS including depression, bloating and breast tenderness.

It is not just your symptoms that decide whether you have PMS but the time at which they are at their worst. PMS is characterised by the symptoms that occur during the days leading up to your period and are then completely relieved by menstruation. The cause of PMS is not completely understood but it is believed to be related to the hormonal changes that occur during the monthly cycle.

Many women obtain relief from their symptoms when their hormonal balance is altered with a medicine prescribed by their doctor. Further information about PMS can be obtained from: National Association for Premenstrual Syndrome41 Old RoadEast PeckhamKentTN12 5AP Post-Natal Depression Many mothers experience short-term periods of mild depression following the birth of their baby.

  • This is a common condition, usually occurring three or four days after delivery, affecting at least half of all new mothers who may feel tearful, overwhelmed and irritable during this time.
  • Support, reassurance and rest can help these feelings to pass within a few days.
  • However, if the anxiety does not improve, the mother may be developing postnatal depression.

Up to 15 per cent of new mothers develop more severe symptoms within 12 months of their child’s birth. Postnatal depression (PND) is characterised by marked low mood for a more prolonged period of time.

  • Though it may take several weeks or months until a full recovery is reached, PND is a treatable condition from which the mother will get better.
  • Speak to your midwife, health visitor or doctor if you have any further questions.
  • 51011359 20146776

: Cyclogest 400mg pessaries
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Asked By: Anthony Russell Date: created: Jan 13 2024

Does progesterone help baby grow in womb

Answered By: Bryan Roberts Date: created: Jan 13 2024

During pregnancy: Progesterone helps support the fetus as it grows – When a woman is pregnant they produce hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin hormone). This is a signal to the ovaries to continue to produce progesterone. hCG prevents the onset of her menses (the blood and matter discharged during ovulation) and enables a woman to become pregnant.
View complete answer

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How long should you lie down after progesterone pessary?

Remain lying down for around 30 minutes after putting the pessary in.6. Throw away the wrapper and wash your hands thoroughly. You may like to wear a pantyliner for any discharge which may happen while using progesterone pessaries.
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Why do doctors suggest progesterone during pregnancy?

When Do Pregnant Women Need Progesterone Shots? If you’ve had a in the past, your doctor may prescribe progesterone shots during your current pregnancy to help, Babies born early (before 37 weeks of pregnancy) can have health problems, including breathing and feeding problems, vision problems, and learning problems.

The progesterone shot (sometimes called “17P” for the drug name or its brand name, Makena) can help prevent an early birth.17P has the hormone in it, which helps prevent contractions. The uterus contracts during labor to help “push” a baby out of the womb for delivery. Doctors recommend starting 17P shots during the of pregnancy (usually between 16 and 20 weeks), and continuing them until 36 weeks.

Health care providers give the shots in the back of a woman’s arm, or in the hip or thigh area. As with any shot, there’s a risk of minor side effects like redness and soreness at the shot site. Rarely, some women get blood clots or have allergic reactions.
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Can the progesterone suppositories hurt the baby?

Are there side effects? A Progesterone does not have any harmful effects on babies. For mothers, side effects are rare, but may include redness, soreness, itching or bruising at the site where the shot is given. The suppositories may cause vaginal dryness.
View complete answer

Does Cyclogest cause weight gain?

progestogens – weight gain – Progestogens can cause weight gain, which may be significant (as is the case with parenteral medroxyprogesterone) and undesirable in obese patients attempting to lose weight.
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Asked By: James Hill Date: created: Jul 12 2023

Can you miscarry while on progesterone suppositories

Answered By: Norman Price Date: created: Jul 15 2023

Progesterone and miscarriage Written by Dr Sarah Merritt Progesterone is an important hormone. It is produced by the corpus luteum in the ovary during the menstrual cycle regardless of whether a woman becomes pregnant or not and then continues to be released if a woman does become pregnant.

It helps thicken the lining of the womb in order for a pregnancy to implant and helps to support and maintain a pregnancy. In women undergoing IVF progesterone is given to help prepare the lining of the womb for embryo implantation. Progesterone has previously been given to women with a history of recurrent miscarriage (3 or more miscarriages in a row) without adequate evidence from studies to support its use and there has been an ongoing debate whether it should be given or not.

Only in the last 10 years have larger studies looked at the potential benefits of using progesterone with women with recurrent miscarriage. Recurrent miscarriage affects bout 1% of couples and often after investigation, most couples have no reason as to why they have had so many losses.

Randomised: a computer made the selection randomly as to which women were given the treatment (in this case progesterone) or a placebo A placebo is a substance that is made to look like a real drug/ medication but contains an inactive or ‘dummy’ substance.

The women did not know who had had the progesterone and who had had the placebo until after the trial was over. The study took place at multiple hospitals over the UK and the Netherlands. A successful outcome was judged to be a live birth after 24 weeks of gestation.

For those who received progesterone 65.8% of women had a livebirth after 24 weeks For those who got the placebo 63.3% had a livebirth after 24 weeks

The difference between the two groups (3.5%) was not statistically significant, meaning that the difference could have been due to chance. The results showed that progesterone did not help reduce the risk of another miscarriage in women with recurrent miscarriages.

This was extremely disappointing news for both doctors, nurses and researchers, however it did show that in both groups the majority of women had babies. No harmful affect were seen from use of progesterone and for those that did miscarry, progesterone did not delay the miscarriage process. The study also meant that the same group of researchers focused on further studies including possible benefits of progesterone treatments in women with bleeding in early pregnancy.

The PRISM trial This trial involved 4153 women from 48 hospitals across the UK. It examined whether progesterone given to women with bleeding in early pregnancy increased the chances of having a live birth by preventing miscarriage. Bleeding can affect 20% of women in early pregnancy.

Double blind: Neither the women who participated in the study or the doctors and nurses knew who was having the placebo and who had the progesterone. Placebo controlled- half the women had the active or treatment medication and the other half (the controls) had the placebo.

For those women taking part in the study approximately half were randomized to take progesterone and half to take a placebo if they had bleeding in the first 12 weeks of pregnancy and an ultrasound scan showed a baby with a heart beat. The overall live birth rate for:

Women who took progesterone the live birth rate was 75% For women who took the placebo it was 72%

The difference of 3% between the two groups was again not statistically significant meaning that this difference could have happened by chance. However when the results where further examined and spilt by the number of previous miscarriages that a participant had previously suffered:

No previous miscarriages: the live birth rate was 74% in the progesterone group and 75% in the placebo group- this shows no benefit of taking progesterone 1-2 previous miscarriages: the live birth rate was 76% in the progesterone group and 72% in the placebo group- this shows some benefit.3 or more recurrent miscarriages: the live birth rate was 72% in the progesterone group and 57% in the placebo group- this shows significant benefit, which means that the difference between the two groups did not happen by chance alone.

The overall conclusion is that women who have bleeding in early pregnancy and a previous history of miscarriage could benefit from progesterone. Not every GP or clinician may have heard of the results and if you do have bleeding in early pregnancy and have had previous miscarriages you should discuss the results from PRISM with your GP or early pregnancy unit.
View complete answer

Can Cyclogest give you cramps?

Cyclogest 400mg pessaries cyclogest ® 400mg pessary Micronised Progesterone Cyclogest is the registered trademark of L.D. Collins & Co. Ltd.

  • Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again.
  • If you have any further questions, ask your doctor, pharmacist or nurse.
  • This medicine has been prescribed for you. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their signs of illness are the same as yours.
  • If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This includes any possible side effects not listed in this leaflet. See section 4.
  • 1 What Cyclogest is and what it is used for 2 What you need to know before you use Cyclogest 3 How to use Cyclogest 4 Possible side effects 5 How to store Cyclogest
  • 6 Contents of the pack and other information

Cyclogest contains micronised progesterone which is a natural, female sex hormone, produced in the body. Cyclogest works by adjusting the hormonal balance within the body for the treatment of:

  • pre-menstrual syndrome which often affects women during the 7 to 10 days before their monthly period. The symptoms of pre-menstrual syndrome include feelings of tension, irritability, depression, headache, breast tenderness, weight gain and bloatedness
  • post-natal depression which some women get after their baby has been born.
  • women who need extra progesterone while undergoing treatment in an Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) programme.
  • are allergic to progesterone or any of the other ingredients of this medicine (listed in section 6),
  • have unusual vaginal bleeding that has not been evaluated by the doctor,
  • have known or suspected tumour that is hormone sensitive,
  • have porphyria disorders (a group of inherited or acquired disorders of certain enzymes),
  • have or have had blood clots in the legs, lungs, eyes or elsewhere in the body,
  • currently have or have had severe liver problems.
  • have a miscarriage and your physician suspects some tissue is still in the uterus or pregnancy outside of the womb.

Talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse before using Cyclogest. Take special care and tell your doctor straight away if you experience any of these symptoms during treatment or even few days after the last dosage:

  • pains in the calves or chest, a sudden shortness of breath or coughing blood indicating possible clots in the legs, heart, or lungs
  • severe headache or vomiting, dizziness, faintness, or changes in vision or speech, weakness or numbness of an arm or leg indicating possible clots in the brain or eye
  • worsening of depression

Check with your doctor or pharmacist before using Cyclogest if you have or ever have had:

  • liver problems such as jaundice (yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes).
  • epilepsy
  • migraine
  • asthma
  • cardiac or renal dysfunction
  • diabetes

There is no relevant use of Cyclogest in children. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking, have recently taken or might take any other medicines. This is especially important in case you are taking carbamazepine (e.g. to prevent fits, treat certain type of pain or mood disorders), rifampicin (to treat infections) or phenytoin (e.g.

  1. Cyclogest can be used during the first trimester of pregnancy for women who need extra progesterone while undergoing treatment in an Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) programme.
  2. The risks of congenital (conditions present at birth) anomalies, including genital abnormalities in male or female infants, from exposure to exogenous progesterone during pregnancy have not been fully established.
  3. For other use, if you are pregnant, think you may be pregnant or are planning to have a baby, ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice before using this medicine.
  4. This medicine should not be used during breast feeding.

Always use this medicine exactly as your doctor has told you. Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure. For women undergoing Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) programme : The recommended dose is 400 mg twice a day by vaginal insertion,

  • For the treatment of premenstrual syndrome and post-natal depression :
  • The recommended dose is 200 mg once a day or 400 mg twice a day by vaginal or rectal insertion,
  • The pessary may be inserted into either the vagina or rectum (back passage) depending upon the following certain other conditions.
  • You should insert Cyclogest into the:
  • vagina if you have:
    • colitis (inflammation of the colon causing frequent attacks of diarrhoea with mucous or blood)
    • problems controlling your bowel movements (faecal incontinence).
  • rectum (back passage) if you have:
    • a vaginal infection (discharge from your vagina)
    • or often have cystitis (a burning pain on passing water)
    • recently given birth
    • to use a barrier method of birth control such as a diaphragm, cap or condom. Such devices may not work properly in the presence of the hard fat from the pessary.

For premenstrual tension start using Cyclogest on day 12 or 14 of your menstrual cycle. This can be planned and marked onto your calendar; day 1 is the first day of your monthly period, counting forward to day 12 or 14 as advised by your doctor. Do not swallow Cyclogest. Always wash your hands before and after inserting the pessary. To insert into the:

  • Vagina – place the pessary between the lips of the vagina and push the pessary upwards and backwards. You may find it easier to do this if you are lying down or squatting.
  • Rectum (back passage) – gently push the pessary into the rectum for about one inch. Your muscles will hold the pessary in place when it is in far enough. Squeeze your buttocks together for a few seconds.
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If you (or someone else) has accidentally swallowed any of the pessaries or you use too many, contact your nearest hospital casualty department or your doctor immediately for advice. If you forget to insert a pessary, do so as soon as you remember, unless it is nearly time for the next dose.

  1. Never use two doses together.
  2. Remember to use the remaining doses at the correct time.
  3. Please consult your doctor or pharmacist for advice if you intend to stop or have stopped using Cyclogest.
  4. Abrupt discontinuation of progesterone dosing may cause increased anxiety, moodiness, and increased sensibility to seizures.

If you have any further questions on the use of this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Like all medicines, this medicine can cause side effects, although not everybody gets them. Stop using Cyclogest and contact your doctor at once if you have an allergic reaction.

  1. Common (may affect up to 1 in 10 people)
  2. Drowsiness, stomach discomfort or pain, breast pain
  3. Not known (frequency cannot be estimated from the available data)
  4. Diarrhoea, soreness in your rectum (back passage), flatulence (wind), changes in your menstrual cycle (you may find that your monthly period will start earlier than usual or it may be delayed), leakage after the pessary has dissolved (this is quite normal when using medicines that are inserted into the vagina or rectum)
  5. Adverse reactions in patients undergoing ART treatment is presented below:
  6. Common side effects (may affect up to 1 in 10 people):
  • Abdominal distension (swelling in the abdomen), abdominal pain, constipation
  • Sleepiness
  • Tiredness
  • Hot flush
  • Breast pain

Uncommon side effects (may affect up to 1 in 100 people):

  • Headache, dizziness, mood changes
  • Change in taste, vomiting, flatulence (wind), diarrhoea, bloat (gastric dilatation), rectal tumour
  • Night sweats, skin rash or itching
  • Joint pain
  • Pelvic pain, ovarian enlargement, vaginal bleeding
  • Frequent urination, involuntary excretion of urine
  • Weight increase
  • Bleeding
  • Itching at the application site, feeling cold or body temperature change or general discomfort

If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor, pharmacist or nurse. This includes any possible side effects not listed in this leaflet. You can also report side effects directly via the Yellow Card Scheme at: www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard or via the Yellow Card app, which can be downloaded from the Apple App Store, or Google Play Store,

  • Do not throw away any medicines via wastewater or household waste.
  • Ask your pharmacist how to throw away medicines you no longer use.
  • These measures will help protect the environment.
  • The active substance (the ingredient that makes the medicine work) is micronised progesterone. Each pessary contains 400 mg of the active Ingredient.
  • The other ingredients are hard fat.

Cyclogest are off-white, torpedo-shaped pessaries. Pack sizes are 15.L.D. Collins & Co. Ltd.1st FloorGallery Court28 Arcadia AvenueLondonN3 2FGUK Accord-UK Ltd.BarnstapleEX32 8NSUK

  1. This leaflet was last revised in March 2022.
  2. Further Information:
  3. Premenstrual Syndrome

Many women suffer from a condition called premenstrual syndrome or PMS. This is commonly known as PMT (premenstrual tension) because of the anxiety and bad temper often associated with it. However, there are many other symptoms that occur with PMS including depression, bloating and breast tenderness.

  1. It is not just your symptoms that decide whether you have PMS but the time at which they are at their worst.
  2. PMS is characterised by the symptoms that occur during the days leading up to your period and are then completely relieved by menstruation.
  3. The cause of PMS is not completely understood but it is believed to be related to the hormonal changes that occur during the monthly cycle.

Many women obtain relief from their symptoms when their hormonal balance is altered with a medicine prescribed by their doctor. Further information about PMS can be obtained from: National Association for Premenstrual Syndrome41 Old RoadEast PeckhamKentTN12 5AP Post-Natal Depression Many mothers experience short-term periods of mild depression following the birth of their baby.

  1. This is a common condition, usually occurring three or four days after delivery, affecting at least half of all new mothers who may feel tearful, overwhelmed and irritable during this time.
  2. Support, reassurance and rest can help these feelings to pass within a few days.
  3. However, if the anxiety does not improve, the mother may be developing postnatal depression.

Up to 15 per cent of new mothers develop more severe symptoms within 12 months of their child’s birth. Postnatal depression (PND) is characterised by marked low mood for a more prolonged period of time.

  • Though it may take several weeks or months until a full recovery is reached, PND is a treatable condition from which the mother will get better.
  • Speak to your midwife, health visitor or doctor if you have any further questions.
  • 51011359 20146776

: Cyclogest 400mg pessaries
View complete answer

Do I have to insert pessary at night?

If you forget to use it – If you forget to use a pessary or internal cream at bedtime, use it during the night if you remember. If you only remember the next day, wait until bedtime for your next dose. Pessaries and internal cream work best at night. If you’re using the external cream and you forget to put it on, use it as soon as possible and continue putting it on 2 to 3 times a day as usual.
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Asked By: Colin Moore Date: created: Dec 20 2022

How long does pessary take to dissolve

Answered By: Stanley Long Date: created: Dec 20 2022

Clotrimazole for vaginal thrush. Clotrimazole cream

Clotrimazole is an antifungal medicine.Side-effects are unlikely but may include mild skin irritation or itching.If your symptoms do not improve within seven days, speak with your doctor.Do not use more than two courses of clotrimazole within six months without speaking with a doctor for further advice.

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Type of medicine An antifungal medicine Used for Vaginal thrush Also called Canesten® Available as Cream, intravaginal (internal) cream, pessary, and as combination packs

Many women have an occasional bout of, It is due to an infection with a yeast fungus called Candida spp. Most cases of thrush are caused by the yeast called Candida albicans but other types of Candida spp. can also cause thrush. Common symptoms of vaginal thrush are itching, soreness, and redness around the outside of the vagina and a thick, creamy white, odourless vaginal discharge.

Clotrimazole works by killing the yeast fungus causing the infection. Clotrimazole is usually applied in two ways to treat thrush. A pessary or internal (intravaginal) cream is inserted high into the vagina to treat the infection. Then a cream (usually containing 2% clotrimazole) is applied around the outside of the vagina to relieve the itching and soreness.

Many of the products available are ‘combi’ packs – these contain either a pessary or internal cream, and also a cream for external use. Clotrimazole is available on prescription and you can also buy it at a pharmacy, without a prescription, if you have previously been diagnosed by your doctor as having vaginal thrush.

If you are pregnant. This is because you should only use medicines on the recommendation of a doctor while you are expecting a baby. Also, you may need to use clotrimazole for a longer period of time during pregnancy than is usually recommended.If you are under 16 or over 60 years of age.If you have had more than two episodes of thrush in six months.If you have a foul-smelling or blood-stained vaginal discharge, or if you have blisters or sores in the vaginal area.If you are in pain, feel sick, or have diarrhoea or a fever.If you have previously had a sexually transmitted infection, or if you have had a partner with a sexually transmitted infection.If you have ever had an allergic reaction to a medicine.If you are using or taking any other medicines. This includes medicines which are available to buy without a prescription, as well as herbal and complementary medicines.

Before starting this treatment, read the manufacturer’s printed information leaflet from inside the pack. It will give you more information about how to use the clotrimazole preparation you have been given.If you are using clotrimazole cream, apply the cream to the area around the outside of your vagina and back passage two or three times daily. Rub it in gently. Continue to use the cream until the itching and soreness due to the infection are gone.If you are using clotrimazole intravaginal cream (for example, Canesten 10% VC® or Canesten® Internal Cream), insert one applicatorful high into your vagina at bedtime. A single dose is usually sufficient to treat the infection. If you are having your period, ask your doctor when you should use the cream.If you are using a clotrimazole pessary, use the applicator to insert the pessary high up into your vagina at bedtime. Depending upon the strength of the pessary, a single dose is usually sufficient to treat the infection. If you are having your period, ask your doctor when you should use the pessary. If you are pregnant, do not use the applicator which is provided to insert the pessary, unless your doctor has recommended you to do so. Instead, use a finger to insert the pessary as high as possible.

Use clotrimazole exactly as your doctor tells you to, or as directed on the pack. Remember to complete the course of treatment as this will help to prevent the infection from coming back. If your symptoms do not improve within seven days, see your doctor for further advice.A pessary will dissolve overnight in the moisture in the vagina. If you have problems with vaginal dryness you may notice some undissolved pieces of pessary the following morning.Clotrimazole can damage the latex in condoms and diaphragms so do not rely on these forms of contraception. Use an alternative method of contraception (or do not have sex) for at least five days after using clotrimazole. Please also keep in mind that having vaginal sex while you have thrush could infect your partner.If after seven days your symptoms recur, you can buy a repeat course of clotrimazole from a pharmacy. If you have more than two occurrences of thrush during six months, you should speak with a doctor for further advice. An alternative treatment could be more suitable for you.

Clotrimazole is unlikely to cause any serious side-effects. It can occasionally cause some irritation when it is used at first. If you experience any other symptoms, speak with your doctor or pharmacist for further advice.

Keep all medicines out of the reach and sight of children.Store in a cool, dry place, away from direct heat and light.

If you suspect that someone has swallowed some of this medicine, go to the accident and emergency department of your local hospital. Take the container with you, even if it is empty. This medicine is for you. Never give it to other people even if their condition appears to be the same as yours. Do not keep out-of-date or unwanted medicines. Take them to your local pharmacy which will dispose of them for you. If you have any questions about this medicine ask your pharmacist.

Clotrimazole for vaginal thrush. Clotrimazole cream
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Does Cyclogest make you sleepy?

Dosage of Cyclogest 400 MG If you think you have taken too much of this medicine, contact your doctor immediately or visit the nearest hospital. Symptoms of an overdose include drowsiness, dizziness, sleepiness or painful menst
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Asked By: Nathan Mitchell Date: created: Dec 30 2022

Is it normal for progesterone suppositories to leak out

Answered By: Jake Lopez Date: created: Jan 01 2023

Will the progesterone cause any discharge? – Yes – progesterone can cause you to have more discharge than what you are used to. This is perfectly normal and it may have a white-ish color to it. Discharge is most likely to be the heaviest right after insertion.
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Asked By: Henry Jackson Date: created: Feb 02 2023

How early in pregnancy should you take progesterone

Answered By: Gilbert Taylor Date: created: Feb 05 2023

What is progesterone? Progesterone is a hormone. Hormones are chemicals made by the body. Progesterone helps the uterus (womb) grow during pregnancy and keeps it from having contractions. If you have contractions in early pregnancy, it may lead to miscarriage,

  • This is the loss of a pregnancy before 20 weeks of pregnancy.
  • In later pregnancy, progesterone helps your breasts get ready to make breast milk,
  • It also helps your lungs work harder to give oxygen to your growing baby.
  • Treatment with progesterone during pregnancy may help reduce the risk for premature birth among certain people.
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Premature birth is birth that happens too soon, before 37 weeks of pregnancy. Premature babies may need to stay in the hospital longer or may have more health problems that babies born full term, Full term means your baby is born between 37 weeks and 40 weeks of pregnancy.

There are two kinds of progesterone treatment: Vaginal progesterone may help reduce your risk for premature birth if you have a short cervix and are pregnant with just one baby. Progesterone shots may help reduce your risk for premature birth if you’re pregnant with just one baby and if you’ve had a baby that was born early in the past.

If you’re pregnant with more than one baby (twins, triplets or more), progesterone treatment isn’t for you. Talk with your health care provider to find out whether progesterone treatment is right for you. What is short cervix? The cervix is the part of your uterus that opens and shortens during labor,

  • These changes allow your cervix to become thinner and softer so your baby can pass through the birth canal during childbirth.
  • Your cervix is short if it’s less than 2 centimeters (20 millimeters) long.
  • If you have a short cervix, it may open too early, before you baby is ready to be born.
  • When your cervix opens too early, it’s known as cervical insufficiency or incompetent cervix.

If you have a short cervix, you have a 1-in-2 chance (50 percent) of having a premature birth. Your health care provider may find that you have a short cervix during an ultrasound, Ask your provider about having an ultrasound to check for short cervix.

You have a short cervix. You’re pregnant with just one baby.

If both of these describe you, your provider may give you a prescription for vaginal progesterone. It comes as a gel, a suppository or a capsule. You use an applicator that looks like a tampon to put the progesterone in your vagina every day. You may begin treatment before or up to 24 weeks of pregnancy, and continue it until just before 37 weeks.

Are pregnant with more than one baby Have preterm premature rupture of membranes Have a positive fetal fibronectin test Had an episode of preterm labor that was stopped successfully

What are progesterone shots? Progesterone shots are a kind of progesterone called 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (also called 17P, or Makena). The shots may be given to pregnant people who:

Had a previous spontaneous premature birth when pregnant with just one baby. Spontaneous means that labor began on its own, without drugs or other methods. Or the sac around the baby broke early, causing labor. Are pregnant with just one baby. Don’t have liver disease, untreated high blood pressure, or a type of cancer that is sensitive to hormones.

If these describe you, your provider may prescribe progesterone shots. You begin the shots between 16 and 24 weeks of pregnancy, and you get a shot each week until 37 weeks. Your health insurance or state Medicaid program may help pay for the shots. In some states, you may be able to get a kind of 17P from special pharmacies.

  1. Even if you get progesterone shots, they don’t always work to prevent another premature birth.
  2. They don’t reduce your chances of giving birth early if you’re pregnant with more than one baby.
  3. And they don’t reduce your chances of giving birth early if your previous premature birth wasn’t spontaneous.
  4. Talk with your provider about safety and side effects of progesterone shots.

You may have some discomfort where the shot was given.17P is safe for your baby. Last reviewed: December 2020
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Asked By: Ronald Brown Date: created: Oct 13 2023

How many days after progesterone is transfer

Answered By: Evan Powell Date: created: Oct 15 2023

Step 2 – Embryo Transfer – Embryo transfer is usually performed on the third to fifth day of progesterone therapy. As with natural cycle FET, embryos are thawed on the morning of the scheduled frozen embryo transfer. In our laboratory, approximately 60-70 percent of embryos survive cryopreservation and thawing.

We usually transfer 1 to 2 embryos during each FET cycle. However, this number is flexible, and your physician will discuss this issue with you. Excellent FET pregnancy rates occur in most cases with the transfer of one to two embryos, which also minimizes the risk of multiples. The transfer of more embryos may increase the likelihood of a multiple pregnancy, which increases the pregnancy risks for the woman and the fetuses.

The actual embryo transfer itself is identical to the embryo transfer following in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer. Depending upon the physician’s protocol the embryo transfer may be accomplished under ultrasound guidance which will require the bladder to be full.
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Asked By: Alan Campbell Date: created: Jun 12 2023

How do you insert progesterone suppositories when pregnant

Answered By: William Long Date: created: Jun 12 2023

Progesterone Vaginal Suppositories (PVS) What are they? Progesterone Vaginal Suppositories (PVS) are vaginal suppositories which contain the natural hormone progesterone. They are made special by the pharmacist to contain an exact amount of progesterone as prescribed by your doctor.

  • The progesterone is absorbed slowly from the vagina to replace or add to normal progesterone levels in the blood.
  • Progesterone is the hormone secreted each month by the egg capsule (called the corpus luteum) after ovulation which is responsible for preparing the lining of the uterus for pregnancy or the menstrual period.

What are PVS used for? PVS are used for the treatment of infertility due to luteal phase defects or ovulation problems and for the treatment of recurrent spontaneous miscarriages. Women treated with gonadotropins (HMG/FSH) or ART (Assisted Reproductive Technologies such as IVF or Egg Donation IVF) are also given PVS.

  • They are also used widely for the treatment of premenstrual syndrome (PMS.) How are PVS used? PVS are usually prescribed to be used twice a day for a certain number of days in the second half of the menstrual cycle.
  • Infertility patients should start them on the evening of the second day of BBT temperature rise or the evening of the third day after LH Kit surge and continue them twice daily until menses begins (not just spotting) or until you have had a negative blood pregnancy test or until ten weeks of pregnancy.

If they are stopped too soon, a miscarriage could result. PMS patients should use them 2-4 times a day as directed while continuing to do careful charting. When should I use them? You should put the suppository high in the vagina the first thing in the morning and try to stay in bed for 10-15 minutes if possible (set your alarm early!).

At night, you should put the suppository high in the vagina just before you go to sleep. If you plan to have intercourse, put the suppository in afterwards. However, it will not hurt you or your partner to have intercourse with the suppository in place and should not interrupt your sex life. You may find that it is more comfortable to wear a minipad during the day when using PVS as they will melt and create a light discharge.

Are there any side effects or complications from PVS? PVS are one of the safest treatments available as they contain only natural progesterone. An occasional woman will complain of irritation or unpleasant discharge with PVS, but the great majority of women have no problems at all.

There are no known serious side effects from PVS and there is no known risk to the baby during pregnancy. PVS have been widely used for many years and are considered very safe. Are there any special instructions? PVS should be kept in the refrigerator as they will melt if they get very warm. You may leave the morning suppository next to your bed overnight without problems.

If you are going out of town or will run out of your prescription on a weekend, be sure to get a refill so that you can continue them if your period does not start as expected. : Progesterone Vaginal Suppositories (PVS)
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Do you have to lie down after progesterone pessaries?

Remain lying down for around 30 minutes after insertion of the pessary. The best time to insert the pessary is at night before going to bed. Throw away any unused materials and wash your hands thoroughly. You may wish to wear a pantyliner for any minor discharge which may occur whilst using progesterone pessaries.
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Asked By: Thomas Perez Date: created: Dec 02 2022

How do you insert a pessary when pregnant

Answered By: Gilbert Lewis Date: created: Dec 05 2022

Is it safe to use clotrimazole in pregnancy? – Clotrimazole is generally considered safe for pregnant women to use. If you are using the pessary to treat vaginal thrush during pregnancy it is recommended that you insert it with your fingers rather than with the applicator provided,
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How far does progesterone need to be inserted?

Talk to your doctor or pharmacist – Health professional and patient talking Placing a vaginal suppository should be easy and painless. Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or are having trouble inserting the suppository properly. Check with your doctor if you notice rectal bleeding, blistering, pain, burning, itching, or other sign of irritation not present before you started using this medicine.

  1. Question : When are vaginal suppositories used? Answer : Vaginal suppositories may be used to deliver certain medications to the vaginal area.
  2. These medications include anti-infectives, hormones, and a variety of other uses determined by your doctor.
  3. Occasionally, vaginal suppositories may be utilized if the medication is unable to be delivered with another dosage form.

Question : What if the suppository comes out after inserting it? Answer : It is possible that you may not have pushed it far enough into the vagina. Typically, patients are instructed to insert approximately ½ to 1 inch, which is the distance for most adults.

If you are still having trouble contact your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Question : How long does it take to for a suppository to dissolve after I insert it? Answer : The length of time it takes for a vaginal suppository to dissolve varies on a number of factors, including your body temperature, the temperature of suppository prior to insertion, and the type of base.

On average most suppositories will melt in 10-15 minutes, although it can take up to a half hours. If you are still having trouble contact your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Question : How long after inserting the vaginal suppository should I wait to have sex? Answer : The answer to this question varies based on the type of medication contained in your suppository and sometimes there is more information you need to make an informed decision.
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