Asked By: Jonathan Martin Date: created: Sep 02 2023

Is Lurpak spreadable healthier than butter

Answered By: Cody Davis Date: created: Sep 04 2023

My verdict on the bestsellers – Typical nutritional values per 100g 1. TESCO ENRICHED OLIVE SPREAD 500g, £1.25 540 cal. Fat: 59g (saturates 14.5g; monounsaturates 31.5g; polyunsaturates 10g, trans 0.5g). Salt 1.3g. Verdict: The healthiest choice, a lower-fat spread than most and the majority is monounsaturated fats that counteract the artery-clogging effect of saturated fat in our diet. 2. STORK 500g, 60p 531 cal. Fat: 59g (saturates 14.8g; monounsaturates 29.7g, polyunsaturates 14g, trans 0.5g). Salt: 1.8g. Verdict: Lower in total fat than most and only a quarter is saturates. Also high in monounsaturates. Ideal for baking because it has a similar texture to butter. 3. FLORA BUTTERY 500g, £1.68 634 cal. Fat: 70g (saturates 15.6g, monounsaturates 19.9g, polyunsaturates 34g, trans 0.5g). Salt: 1.6g. Verdict: Still lower fat than butter and very low in saturates. High polyunsaturates make this a soft spread but these are not as good for heart health as they do not contribute to good HDL cholesterol levels. 4. LURPAK LIGHTER SPREADABLE 500g, £2.41 544 cal. Fat: 60g (saturates 26.6g, monounsaturates 21.3g, polyunsaturates 6.5g, trans 1.5g). Salt: 0.8g. Verdict: Butter is blended with vegetable oil such as rapeseed, high in monounsaturates. Almost half the fat content is saturated fat, but this is still a healthier choice than butter and lower in total fat content. 5. LURPAK BUTTER 250g, £1.25 740 cal. Fat: 81g (saturates 52g, monounsaturates 21g, polyunsaturates 28g, trans 7g). Salt: 1.2g. Verdict: Delicious but extremely unhealthy as more than half of the total fat is saturated fat; legally, butter must contain at least 80g of fat per 100g.

Is Lurpak spread good for you?

Is a Lighter Butter Better for Diabetics? – Given butter’s high calorie and fat content, if you have diabetes, it may be a good idea to choose Lurpak butter in the Lurpak Lighter version or Lurpak Lightest, with reduced fat content. These versions are specially formulated to be less impactful on the body, especially for overweight people.

Is Lurpak spreadable butter bad for you?

Lurpak spreadable unsalted – Amanda’s verdict: This spread is a good choice if trying to limit salt in your diet. It is high in total fats but lower in polyunsaturated fats compared with other spreadable examples. The researchers of the study would be likely to give this the thumbs up.

Is Lurpak spreadable real butter?

LURPAK Spreadable-Slightly Salted Blended spread 78%. A blend of Lurpak butter and rapeseed oil. Ingredients: Butter (62%) (MILK), rapeseed oil, water, lactic culture (MILK), salt. Contains Milk (and products thereof)Approved for a Halal DietApproved for a Kosher DietSuitable for a Vegetarian DietSuitable for a Coeliacs Diet Always read the label before using the product and never rely solely on the information presented on our website.

Average Serving 8 g or ml
Energy/Calories per 100g 2868 kJ
Energy/Calories per 100g 697 kcal
Protein per 100g 0.5 g
Fat per 100g 77 g
of which Saturates per 100g 34 g
Carbohydrate Per 100g 0.6 g
of which Sugars per 100g 0.6 g
Salt per 100g 0.9 g

LURPAK Spreadable-Slightly Salted

Asked By: Alex Williams Date: created: Jun 06 2023

What is the healthiest spread

Answered By: Jeffery Taylor Date: created: Jun 09 2023

Margarine often tops butter when it comes to heart health. Margarine is a blend of oils that are mostly unsaturated fat. Butter is made from cream or milk. The type of fat found in animal products, such as cream, is mostly saturated fat. Replacing saturated fat with unsaturated fat may lower the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Fat in plant oils lowers total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or “bad” cholesterol, when it takes the place of saturated fat. The finding is very strong for oils made mostly of polyunsaturated fats, such as soybean oil, when they replace saturated fat. But some margarines are better than others.

Margarine sold outside of the United States may have trans fats. These fats increase the risk of heart disease. Margarine sold in the U.S. is not allowed to have added trans fats. Depending on the oils and the recipe, margarines have different amounts of saturated fat, salt and vitamins.

  1. The more solid the margarine, the more saturated fat it has.
  2. Stick margarines often have more saturated fat than tub margarines.
  3. So skip the stick and choose soft or liquid margarine instead.
  4. Look for a spread that has the least amount of saturated fat.
  5. The best choice is to find one with less than 10% of the daily value for saturated fat.

You can find this on the nutrition facts label. You also can check labels to see which spread has the least amount of salt. Limit the amount of margarine you use to limit the calories.

What’s so special about Lurpak?

LURPAK® QUALITY BUTTER SINCE 1901​ – We have had an uncompromising approach to making real, quality lactic butter since 1901. Made only with the highest quality ingredients Lurpak® butter has a distinctive, creamy delicate and fresh taste. Our Lurpak® butter process begins with roughly 20kg of whole Danish milk to make every 1kg of butter.

The most valuable and flavoursome part of the milk – the cream – is carefully “ripened” before the butter making process. Lactic cultures are added, giving a fresh and slightly aromatic note with the unmistakable creaminess that creates the characteristic Lurpak® flavour. That’s it. Nothing more is added, apart from a pinch of salt to our Slightly Salted varieties of butter.

: Our story

Is Lurpak real butter or margarine?

spreadable slightly salted A few simple ingredients transformed into greatness. To make Lurpak® Spreadable Slightly Salted we start our recipe with Lurpak® butter made from 100% fresh milk and a pinch of salt. But we know you like to have your Lurpak® ready straight from the fridge! So, to make that possible and ensure this is so, we add some rapeseed oil and just enough water.

Asked By: Carter Bell Date: created: Jan 31 2023

Is Lurpak Natural

Answered By: Norman Garcia Date: created: Feb 02 2023

MADE FROM NATURAL INGREDIENTS We’re all about Good Food. And cooking simply, with a few natural ingredients. Which is why we make Lurpak ® with just a few natural ingredients with humble beginnings, that bring sublime results. So you never have to compromise on quality or taste, as you spread, dollop and battle your way to a kitchen victory, with Lurpak ® by your side.

Asked By: Francis Martinez Date: created: Feb 14 2023

Why is Lurpak spreadable so expensive

Answered By: Samuel Rivera Date: created: Feb 15 2023

Lurpak was one of the more unexpected topics of conversation last year as the cost of living sent the price of butter soaring. For a 750g pack, the price of its tubs jumped to over £7, and retailers had to attach security tags to prevent desperate people from stealing the spread.

The well-known Danish company has gone viral on social media recently, as a result of price increases that, in the words of many customers, “summed up the cost of living problem.” An analysis of the price of Lurpak – and its ‘dupes’ at Aldi and Lidl – shows that all three products have risen in the last year, with shoppers facing as much as a 36 per cent increase, as reported by Lancashire Live,

Following this, shoppers have begun to look for cheaper alternatives but have been left confused as to why the price of the dupes has increased drastically too. While the Lurpak dupes were cheaper, research has found that the price of these has also significantly risen in the past year.

  1. READ NEXT: Thousands attend protest march in Bristol on ‘walkout Wednesday’ Statistics show that only three out of 30 items cost less at the supermarket and shops than they did a year ago, with some essentials soaring by 65 per cent.
  2. Basic items have seen some of the biggest increases, with pasta and vegetable oil now costing double the cost they did back in 2022.
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If you’ve been left wondering why the everyday item has witnessed such a significant surge recently, then we have all the details you need. The butter company raised the price of its products to ensure that dairy farmers get a “fair deal”, according to the BBC,

In a announcement, Lurpak’s owner, Arla Foods, disclosed that dairy farmers have been losing money as a result of rising fertiliser and fuel prices. Discussing the price hikes, a spokesperson for the Danish brand said: “Prices on the shelves have had to rise in recent months. We understand that recent inflation in food price is hitting many households really hard right now.

“Unfortunately, our farmers are facing a similar situation with prices for the feed, fertiliser and fuel they need to produce milk, all rising significantly in recent months. While we don’t set the prices on the shelves, we do work closely with the retailers to ensure our farmers receive a fair price for the milk they produce.” People have taken to social media to complain that all three stores – Aldi, Lidl and Morrisons – have increased their prices.

One person wrote: “Stopped the Lurpak a few years ago, moved to Aldi Norpak, even though it has went up in price in recent times, still less than half the price and tastes just as good.” While Lidl shoppers have also noticed an increase in price, writing “cheap stores are becoming more expensive that the known expensive ones, and she was right why was Lurpak £5.19 at Lidl but £4.00 at Waitrose???” And a Morrisons shopper said: “I reckon they’re both ripping us off, taking advantage of an already bad situation for consumers, they’re ramping their prices up and blaming it all on inflation.

£5 for @Lurpak in @Morrisons that is still got Christmas branding on it, it was 2 for £7 at Christmas, same stock.” Many shoppers have also taken to TikTok following the price hike. “Have my parents won the lottery and not told me?” a girl joked in a video she shared on the showing a number of Lurpak tubs at her parents’ home.

Dad struggling on £30k asks Martin Lewis if he’d be better off on benefits ‘People say I’m faking – I only wish I was’ says student who faints every time she leaves her house Stacey Solomon’s Sort Your Life Out accused of rabbit cruelty by angry viewers and animal welfare groups Bristol teachers say schools have been stripped bare as they demand fairer pay during strike ‘I should have saved them’ – young witness tells double murder trial

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Asked By: Aidan Powell Date: created: Sep 13 2023

What’s the difference between Lurpak and Lurpak spreadable

Answered By: Daniel Bailey Date: created: Sep 15 2023

Lurpak – Wikipedia Danish butter brand Lurpak The Lurpak logo with two crossed Product typeOwnerCountryIntroduced23 October 1901MarketsInternationalTagline Good Food Deserves Lurpak Website Lurpak is a Danish brand of owned by, It is sold in over 75 countries worldwide, and is known for its distinctive silver packaging.

Lurpak came into existence in October 1901 after a combination of several dairy farmers decided to create and register a common brand and mark for butter to increase sales. Its logo is based on the, an ancient instrument once used in Scandinavia. Lurpak salted butter Lurpak’s principal market is the,

Lurpak butter is made from milk, but their spreadable range contains rapeseed oil.

Asked By: Keith Nelson Date: created: Dec 04 2023

Should Lurpak spreadable be kept in the fridge

Answered By: Martin Moore Date: created: Dec 07 2023

Really, it comes down to personal preference; if soft, spreadable butter is what you prefer, go ahead and keep your butter at room temperature. Just be sure to keep it covered and use it within a few days. And to play it safe, keep out just the amount you think you’ll use in a few days, then replenish the butter dish.

What country is Lurpak from?

The history of Lurpak® Genuine excellence and flavour are hard-earned qualities. Registered on 23 October 1901 as the trademark for quality Danish butter, the ‘Lurmark’ can still be seen on Lurpak® today. The trademark features two entwined ‘lurs’ – Bronze Age musical instruments that have become symbols of Denmark.

Lurpak butter from Arla From 1911, only dairies adhering to a rigorous system of regular blind tastings could use the ‘Lurmark’ Danish Butter brand. These quality controls are still practised today. In fact, our dairy has to submit samples to a panel of independent experts every week. Good food deserves nothing less.

The ‘Lurmark’ and Lurpak® brands are owned by the Danish Dairy Board

Does Lurpak spreadable contain palm oil?

Lurpak® Spreadable Slightly Salted Butter 2kg | Foodservice UK Lurpak® ID: 80511 The great taste of Lurpak® spreadable, made from 4 simple ingredients milk, salt, rapeseed oil and water. Making it easy to spread right from the fridge saving time and effort. Contains no palm oil, hydrogenated fats, artificial colourings, preservatives or other additives. Suitable for vegetarians.

Which country made Lurpak butter?

Lurpak butter is made in Denmark from the purest Danish cow’s milk.

Asked By: Alex Morris Date: created: Mar 29 2023

Is it better to eat butter or spread

Answered By: Aidan Turner Date: created: Mar 29 2023

Q: Years ago, I switched from butter to margarine to reduce my cholesterol intake. Now I hear that margarine contains something even worse than cholesterol – trans fat – so I’m thinking about switching back to butter. Weighing the pros and cons, which one really is the healthier choice: butter or margarine? Answer provided by Terese Scollard, M.B.A., R.D., L.D., regional clinical nutrition manager for Providence Nutrition Services: Butter contains a lot of artery-clogging saturated fat, and margarine contains an unhealthy combination of saturated and trans fats, so the healthiest choice is to skip both of them and use liquid oils, such as olive, canola and safflower oil, instead.

However, even dietitians understand that some foods benefit greatly from a little buttery flavor; it wouldn’t be realistic to suggest that you give up butter and margarine altogether. If you want to use one or the other on occasion, margarine is the healthier choice overall – as long as you choose the right type of margarine.

Margarine comes in stick, tub and liquid forms now, and not all of them are created equal. Some stick portions of margarine may be no better than butter in terms of their health effects. The best choices are soft or liquid margarines that have no (or very little) trans fat and less than 3 grams of saturated fat per serving.

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Butter (1 Tbsp) Stick Margarine (1 Tbsp) Soft/Tub Margarine (1 Tbsp) Canola Oil (1 Tbsp)
Calories 100 100 60 120
Total fat 11 g 11 g 7 g 14 g
Saturated fat 7 g 2 g 1 g 1 g
Trans fat 0 g 3 g 0.5 g 0 g
Cholesterol 30 mg 0 mg 0 mg 0 mg

Source: Food and Drug Administration; calories and info on canola oil added)

Asked By: Wallace Bailey Date: created: Nov 03 2023

Is butter spread healthier than butter

Answered By: Jacob Long Date: created: Nov 04 2023

The margarine debate – Margarine and reduced-fat spreads are made up of oils that have been hardened but are still spreadable. They’re made with vegetable oils such as sunflower, canola and olive oils, so they’re much higher in beneficial mono-and polyunsaturated fats than butter.

These healthier fats lift good HDL cholesterol and are cardio-protective. Plus, they’re much lower in saturated fat than butter. The confusion surrounding margarine has come about due to the trans-fats that were once generated by margarine’s original hardening process. Trans fats are a double-whammy: they raise bad LDL cholesterol and lower good HDL cholesterol.

In New Zealand, however, trans fats are not an issue. Manufacturers changed production methods many years ago, so these dangerous fats are now virtually non-existent. However, an olive-oil spread with 16-18 per cent olive oil is just not as health-giving as good-quality extra virgin olive oil itself, and margarine enriched with omega-3 does not confer the same benefits as a diet high in fish and seafood.

Is there a healthy buttery spread?

Margarine vs. butter – Margarine is a lasting impact of diet culture’s fear of fats, Sharp says. It’s not necessarily healthier for you, even if you really “can’t believe it’s not butter.” “When we created margarine, we created trans fats, so a lot of the original stick margarines contain trans fats,” Sharp says.

  • That said, most margarines today use a different technology to create unsaturated fats, so it’s not as big of a concern.” Trans fats are usually found in the form of partially hydrogenated oil and are known to increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and type two diabetes.
  • There’s nothing wrong with margarine that doesn’t contain partially hydrogenated oil, though it does lack certain beneficial fatty acids that regular butter has, like butyric and myristic acid,

Margarine is, however, lower in saturated fats than butter. “If your doctor has told you (they) want you to reduce your reliance on saturated fat, margarine can be a great option,” Sharp says. “But it is high in omega-6s which most people still do get a lot of.” Omega-6s are inflammatory when you consume an excess, imbalanced ratio of them compared to omega-3 fatty acids.

  • North American diets are skewed to consume more omega-6s, which are found in highly processed foods, Sharp says, so we don’t need to be consuming more omega-6s than we already do.
  • The same goes for plant-based, or vegan buttery spreads which are often made the same way as margarine by combining water and oil.

If you’re buying butter alternatives, take a look at the back of the package at the type of oil it’s made with. Plant-based butter made with avocado or olive oil is a healthier choice, but be aware that many companies promote “made with olive oil” spreads that contain a little bit of olive oil and mostly canola, vegetable or safflower oil.

Asked By: Charles Patterson Date: created: Mar 30 2023

What is healthier to spread on toast

Answered By: Evan Rivera Date: created: Apr 02 2023

Spreads for your bread: Some good choices for your health and taste buds Consumer Reports has no financial relationship with any advertisers on this site. There it sits, that bare slice of bread, waiting for you to spread something on it to make it even more appealing and nutritious.

  • What’s the healthiest pick? You could opt for a drizzle of olive oil, mashed avocado, hummus or even low-fat cottage cheese.
  • But many people would prefer dairy butter, margarine, plant or vegan butter or spread, or nut butter.
  • And among these, there are a few considerations.
  • Many spreads are mostly combinations of different oils,” says Amy Keating, nutritionist at CR.

“Some have more saturated fat, but others have mostly ‘good’ fats that can be healthy additions to your diet.” Complicating matters, you may have heard that some studies have suggested that saturated fat is not such a dietary villain. That’s just not true, says Alice H.

Lichtenstein, the Gershoff professor of nutrition science and policy at the Friedman School at Tufts University in Boston. “The data clearly indicate that replacing saturated fat with unsaturated fat decreases heart disease risk,” she says. To help you make the best choice for your health and taste buds, we’ve broken down the differences among the common spreads so that you have the information you need when you’re navigating your choices.

Peanut butter is a good source of plant protein (about 4 grams per table­spoon), but you have other options. There are other nut butters, such as almond, cashew and pistachio. Or you can try a seed butter, such as one made with sunflower, sesame, pumpkin or even watermelon seeds.

  • Pros: “They’re low in saturated fat, so they’re good substitutes for foods high in saturated fat, like red meat,” Lichten­stein says.
  • Unlike animal sources of protein, these butters also contain fiber.
  • Plus, nuts and seeds are generally rich in vitamin E and beneficial phytochemicals.
  • Cons: “Like real butter and spreads, nut butters are a calorie-dense food and should be used in moderation,” Lichtenstein says.

Nut and seed butters also vary in the addi­tives they contain, such as sugar or palm or palm fruit oil, which keeps the spread from separating at room temperature but adds saturated fat. Try a variety of nut and seed butters, but stick with brands that are unsalted or have just a little salt and that list the fewest ingredients.

  • Bread and butter is a breakfast staple — just think hot buttered toast.
  • Made primarily from cream, butter is widely available and keeps well for a dairy food.
  • Pros: Butter isn’t full of additives, and it naturally contains beta carotene that your body converts into vitamin A, which is important for eye health.

(But butter doesn’t provide as much of the nutrient as do orange-colored fruits and vegetables, such as carrots.) Cons: The big one is saturated fat. A tablespoon of butter has about 12 grams of fat, around 7 of them saturated. (If you’re eating 1,800 calories daily, you should be trying to keep your saturated fat intake to less than about 20 grams.) It’s high in calories, too: about 100 per tablespoon, an amount that doesn’t go as far as you might think on a dinner roll or,

These may sound like a new product, but the ingredients in plant butters (sometimes called vegan butters) are pretty similar to those for margarine and vegetable oil spreads. For practical purposes, the categories are interchangeable. Pros: Much like margarine, they’re often made from a combination of plant oils, such as soybean, canola, olive and avocado.

They can be lower in calories and saturated fat than dairy butter and have more heart-healthy mono- and polyunsaturated fats. Cons: The labels may say “made with olive oil” or another healthy-sounding oil, but these products typically contain a mix of plant oils, some of which might not be as good for you as the one being touted.

  • Palm and palm kernel oil are commonly used, which adds a fair amount of saturated fat.
  • They may also have additives, like natural flavors.
  • Taste and texture can vary, too, so it may take some experimenting to find the one you like best.
  • Copyright 2020, Consumer Reports Inc.
  • Consumer Reports is an independent, nonprofit organization that works side by side with consumers to create a fairer, safer, and healthier world.
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CR does not endorse products or services, and does not accept advertising. Read more at, : Spreads for your bread: Some good choices for your health and taste buds

What’s the difference between Lurpak butter and Lurpak spreadable?

Lurpak Danish butter brand Lurpak The Lurpak logo with two crossed Product typeOwnerCountryIntroduced23 October 1901MarketsInternationalTagline Good Food Deserves Lurpak Website Lurpak is a Danish brand of owned by, It is sold in over 75 countries worldwide, and is known for its distinctive silver packaging.

Lurpak came into existence in October 1901 after a combination of several dairy farmers decided to create and register a common brand and mark for butter to increase sales. Its logo is based on the, an ancient instrument once used in Scandinavia. Lurpak salted butter Lurpak’s principal market is the,

Lurpak butter is made from milk, but their spreadable range contains rapeseed oil.

Asked By: Philip King Date: created: May 04 2024

Is there a healthy spreadable butter

Answered By: Jose Kelly Date: created: May 04 2024

Margarine vs. butter – Margarine is a lasting impact of diet culture’s fear of fats, Sharp says. It’s not necessarily healthier for you, even if you really “can’t believe it’s not butter.” “When we created margarine, we created trans fats, so a lot of the original stick margarines contain trans fats,” Sharp says.

“That said, most margarines today use a different technology to create unsaturated fats, so it’s not as big of a concern.” Trans fats are usually found in the form of partially hydrogenated oil and are known to increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and type two diabetes. There’s nothing wrong with margarine that doesn’t contain partially hydrogenated oil, though it does lack certain beneficial fatty acids that regular butter has, like butyric and myristic acid,

Margarine is, however, lower in saturated fats than butter. “If your doctor has told you (they) want you to reduce your reliance on saturated fat, margarine can be a great option,” Sharp says. “But it is high in omega-6s which most people still do get a lot of.” Omega-6s are inflammatory when you consume an excess, imbalanced ratio of them compared to omega-3 fatty acids.

  1. North American diets are skewed to consume more omega-6s, which are found in highly processed foods, Sharp says, so we don’t need to be consuming more omega-6s than we already do.
  2. The same goes for plant-based, or vegan buttery spreads which are often made the same way as margarine by combining water and oil.

If you’re buying butter alternatives, take a look at the back of the package at the type of oil it’s made with. Plant-based butter made with avocado or olive oil is a healthier choice, but be aware that many companies promote “made with olive oil” spreads that contain a little bit of olive oil and mostly canola, vegetable or safflower oil.

Is Lurpak spreadable butter or margarine?

Butter (64%) ( Milk ), Rapeseed Oil, Water, Lactic Culture ( Milk ), Salt ALLERGY ADVICE: FOR ALLERGENS, SEE UNDERLINED INGREDIENTS IN BOLD To create Lurpak® Spreadable, we blend pure Lurpak® butter with rapeseed oil making it spreadable straight from the fridge.

Try it on your favourite fresh bread and top with whatever you fancy. Be inventive, see where the flavours take you. Lurpak® Salted Spreadable is made from natural ingredients. We start our recipe with Lurpak® butter made from 100% fresh milk To make it spreadable, we add rapeseed oil and some water.

The Truth about Saturated Fat | New Narrative Review

That’s all. From pressed rapeseed oil only. No palm oil, preservatives, colourings, or other additives. Suitable for vegetarians. Lurpak. Dietary Information Kosher, Suitable for Vegetarians Manufacturers Address Arla Foods Ltd, Leeds, LS10 1AB, UK. Return to UK contact details: Arla Consumer Careline 0113 382 7009 [email protected] www.lurpak.co.uk Arla Foods Ltd, Leeds, LS10 1AB, UK.

Package type Tub Storage information Suitable for Home Freezing, Cannot be Microwaved, Keep Refrigerated We have done everything we can to ensure that the information we provide about all of the products listed on our website is accurate and up to date. However, food products are constantly being improved so their ingredients and the other information we publish here, including details of their nutritional content and allergy advice, is liable to change.

For this reason, we strongly recommend that you always read the actual product label carefully before using or consuming any product. Please do not rely solely on the information provided on this website. Despite the product information being regularly updated.

  1. Iceland is unable to accept liability for any inaccuracies or incorrect information contained on this site.
  2. This does not affect your statutory rights.
  3. We recommend that you always check the packaging for allergen advice and talk to your doctor if you need any further food allergy advice.
  4. Please remember that products suitable for vegans may not necessarily be suitable for people with food allergies, as advised by The Vegan Society.

In-store availability, prices and promotions may vary from those online. Please check with your local store before visiting. Customer Reviews (530 customer reviews) Submitted by Sandra Carlisle on 13/7/2023 Always buy Lurpak. Best on the market Submitted by Kathleen Riley on 6/7/2023 Good price good quality great taste a brand that you can trust Submitted by Mrs L Swift on 26/8/2022 I always eat.

Lurpak. Toast would not be the same with any thing else Submitted by Miss V Lang on 25/8/2022 I have used Lurpac Spreadable for a number of years because it has very few additional ingredients. Submitted by Iceland Customer on 25/8/2022 always good quality butter. easy to spread from the fridge and wonderful tasting.

Submitted by Mrs I Davis on 25/8/2022 Probably the best butter in the world! Submitted by Mr G Benbow on 25/8/2022 Easy to use straight from fridge and very tasty Submitted by Mrs A Tolputt on 25/8/2022 I like the product and thought it was value for money Submitted by Iceland Customer on 25/8/2022 A good price and nice butter Submitted by Iceland Customer on 25/8/2022 Have used lurpak for years, I love the taste and I wouldn’t think of buying anything else

Asked By: Justin Butler Date: created: Sep 07 2023

Is Lurpak spreadable hydrogenated

Answered By: Sebastian Perez Date: created: Sep 07 2023

Lurpak® Spreadable Slightly Salted Butter 2 kg – The great taste of Lurpak® spreadable, made from 4 simple ingredients milk, salt, rapeseed oil and water. Making it easy to spread right from the fridge saving time and effort. Contains no palm oil, hydrogenated fats, artificial colourings, preservatives or other additives. Suitable for vegetarians. See product