Asked By: Noah Mitchell Date: created: Sep 02 2023

Did Dr Who lose viewers

Answered By: Jayden Ward Date: created: Sep 04 2023

The Doctor Who New Year’s Day special suffered its worst ratings since the show was rebooted 17 years ago. The episode – which starred current Time Lord Jodie Whittaker – pulled in just 3.4million viewers compared to 9million in 2018, it has been revealed.

It comes as Russell T Davies is returning as the Doctor Who showrunner in a bid to save the show amid falling ratings – 12 years after he stepped away from the series. Oh no: The Doctor Who New Year’s Day special suffered its worst ratings since the show was rebooted 17 years ago The special – called Eve Of The Daleks – saw the Doctor become stuck in a terrifying ‘time loop’ where she repeatedly died and came back to life.

The latest figure is for those who watched live on the day. Final ratings, including viewers on catch-up or recordings, will be released next week. A source told The Sun : ‘Jodie’s legacy is leaving behind viewing figures that are among the worst in the show’s long history.

  • ‘Although far more people watch programmes on catch-up, this still doesn’t make up for the decline in viewers since 2018.
  • Change: The episode pulled in just 3.4million viewers compared to 9million in 2018, it has been revealed ‘Plus, the BBC always saw Doctor Who as the kind of show that was ‘event TV’, bringing the whole family together at the same time.

But that doesn’t seem to be happening.’ A BBC spokesperson said: ‘Doctor Who is one of the most popular shows on BBC iPlayer and has been streamed 50 million times in the past year, with 7 million streams so far for the latest series, as audiences increasingly value the option to choose when and where they watch it.’ It was reported last year that there has been a steady fall in Doctor Who viewership, which has been declining for five years.

  1. It was said that Jodie and showrunner Chris had attracted just half the audience during their paring compared to what the Russell-led, David Tennant-fronted version of the show did.
  2. Exciting! It comes as Russell T Davies is returning as the Doctor Who showrunner in a bid to save the show amid falling ratings – 12 years after he stepped away from the series The Telegraph reported at the beginning of the year that episodes were drawing in fewer than 5million viewers.

The paper added that such numbers are ‘not dissimilar to when the show was axed in 1989’. In comparison, more than 10million viewers watched David Tennant’s Doctor Who finale in 2010, according to The Guardian, However, episode Can You Hear Me? saw just 3.81 million viewers tuning in on the over-night ratings, which – according to website Cosmic Book News – was a 22% decrease since the first episode of Season 12, which aired ten months earlier.

  • And in figures released in March 2020, the same month the series ended, Doctor Who’s ratings slipped to its lowest since the show made a comeback in 2005.
  • The season finale of series 12 had a total TV audience of 4.6million, making it the lowest Doctor Who has ever had.
  • The previous all-time low was 4.7million in 2017.

Series 12 saw an average viewership of 5.4million. It comes after earlier this week Doctor Who producers hinted that the next Time Lord will be another woman. Rumours: It comes after earlier this week Doctor Who producers hinted that the next Time Lord will be another woman (pictured is current star Jodie) Production notes for the next series of the BBC ‘s sci-fi show suggest a female will be starring yet again as It’s A Sin’s Lydia West is widely tipped to take over, The Mirro r reports.

Current Time Lord Jodi e’s role comes to an end this autumn with a regeneration episode after she became the first ever female Doctor in 2017. Entertainment industry website Production Weekly lists the new episodes as: ‘A fantasy action saga of a mysterious alien time-traveller, Doctor Who, who picks up human companions, faces evil foes with little more than her wits and a sonic screwdriver and journeys throughout time and space in a police phone booth called the TARDIS.’ Jodie herself recently called for another female doctor to take over the role.

She told Radio 1’s Vick Hope and Jordan North: ‘If we had the power to choose I’m going to pick an actress who I think is really exciting and I think would be phenomenal, an actress called Lydia West. If I had the power!’ Lydia is bookmaker Coral’s favourite to replace Jodie at 3-1 odds, while Fisayo Akinade and Omari Douglas (both 5-1) are joint second favourites and Olly Alexander comes next in the betting at 6-1.

  1. Jodie also recently discussed her emotional last days of filming on Doctor Who.
  2. Could it be you? Production notes for the next series of the BBC’s sci-fi show suggest a female will be starring yet again, claims The Mirror, as Lydia West (pictured) is tipped to take over The actress told Entertainment Weekly of how she was ‘grief ridden’ when she filmed the scenes.

She filmed the final scenes for the autumn episode at the end of 2021 and said of the experience: ‘I’ve shot my version of regen, and it was singularly the most emotional day on set I think I’ve ever had.’ Jodie has said previously that she is leaving the coveted role this year because she feels it needs ‘new energy’ but the star also confessed that she isn’t sure if she is making the correct decision.

Jodie then admitted to the publication that it felt strange to feel sad because she had made the decision to leave. Iconic: Jodie has said previously that she is leaving the coveted role this year because she feels it needs ‘new energy’ She said: ‘It’s a really bizarre feeling, because it’s the best time I’ve ever had on a job, and I made the decision to leave it, so it’s a really strange thing to do to yourself.’ She went on: ‘It was a wonderfully-celebratory-slash-grief-ridden day that I could spend with the family that I’d made.

I suppose the best thing about it is that the episodes are still on. So until they’re off, I don’t have to really get my head around the fact that it’s not my part!’ Before the autumn episode airs, there will be a special episode in spring 2022 called Legend of the Sea Devils.

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What is the lowest rated Doctor Who episode?

IMDb Rating: 4.2 – Hoping to finally get a vacation, the Thirteenth Doctor and her companions travel to a resort on Orphan 55, a strange planet with a terrifying secret and even more horrifying past. “Orphan 55” is the worst-rated episode in the entire show, being panned by both critics and fans alike.

Is Doctor Who season 11 bad?

This season has been marked by change, mostly for the good, though some to the detriment of the overall package. That said, the show’s also gotten back to doing what it does best – but with a new flair.

Asked By: Ralph Lopez Date: created: Feb 27 2023

What is the darkest Doctor Who

Answered By: Oscar Garcia Date: created: Mar 01 2023

Don’t Be Fooled, The Eleventh Doctor Was Scary I’m always a little baffled by the difference in the way people see various Doctors and the way they actually are. Nine is typically described as a grim, melancholy figure even though he spends most of his time being manically joyful.

  1. Eight is written off as a romantic nice guy unless you follow him through the audio stories, where he exhibits coldness and cruelty and the weight of the deaths of his many loved ones.
  2. None illustrate it better than the Eleventh Doctor, who is seen as boyish, awkward and comical.
  3. Which is weird because of all the Doctors, Eleven might actually be the most terrifying figure among them.

Don’t let the silly dancing and fezzes fool you; he is arguably the darkest Doctor of them all. For instance 3. He Blew Up God Knows How Many Cybermen Just to Make a Point It’s one of the most iconic moments in Eleven’s tenure. Rory Williams marches into a Cyberman control ship to demand that the Cybermen tell him where Amy Pond is because their legion monitors that whole sector of space.

  • Then, when he questions them, half their fleet explodes behind him.
  • Badass, right? Except think about it.
  • The Cybermen didn’t kidnap Amy.
  • The Cybermen weren’t involved at all.
  • They just happened to be hanging around in the area where Amy was supposed to be.
  • Not only that, The Doctor didn’t even give the Cyberman a real chance to answer the question.

He pre-emptively murdered hundreds if not thousands of them to give Rory a cool line to say. Yes, the Cybermen are traditionally bad guys, but in this case their biggest sin wasknowing something The Doctor wanted to know? 2. He Literally Thinks He’s a God There’s this unforgettable scene in “Rings of Akhaten” where Eleven pours his memories into a parasitic, planet-size entity to overload its appetite for experience.

  • To do this, he makes this impassioned speech about how the entity isn’t the god people think it is and instead just feeds on the lives of others.
  • It’s one of Matt Smith’s finest moments on the show, and it would be a lot easier to unconditionally love it except for the fact The Doctor is clearly talking not about the entity but himself.

The level to which Eleven assumes control over people’s lives with cold indifference is chilling. In “The God Complex,” he tells Amy that he blatantly took her with him because he wanted to be unconditionally adored by someone who had waited for him since childhood, and that he did so knowing that he was definitely going to do irreparable damage to her.

Then he does very nearly the exact same thing with Clara Oswald, haunting her childhood and basically turning her into a custom-made traveling companion willing to die across his timeline as if he were some sort of blood deity absorbing virgin sacrifices. To say nothing of the fact that he knows she has some bizarre fate tied to him and hides it from her.

In fact, what’s his reasoning behind wanting to get rid of Amy during the events of “The Beast Below”? It’s not because he thought he was going to have to kill the starwhale that was powering Starship UK, but because Amy had presumed to make a moral judgment on his behalf without his knowledge.

Ten may have called himself the Time Lord Victorious, but Eleven’s god complex was the really frightening one to behold.1. He Straight Up Murdered Amy PondTwice It’s rare for regular companions to out and out die during their travels with The Doctor (unless you’re Eight, in which case only one has made it out alive and it barely counts because he thinks she’s dead anywayseriously, Big Finish, you don’t have to kill everyone).

It does happen, but as far as I can tell, Eleven is the only Doctor to have actually on-purpose killed a companion in cold blood. Twice, no less. The first time is in “The Almost People,” when it’s revealed that the Amy who has been traveling on the TARDIS is actually a doppelganger made of synthetic flesh material.

He then proceeds to melt the doppelganger into a puddle with the sonic screwdriver. While we were all oohing and aahing over a plot twist, we forgot that we had just spent two whole episodes establishing that the flesh doppelgangers are in fact sentient beings with humanity. In fact, that was the whole point of the episode, with one of the doppelgangers taking over the life of his original after the original is killed.

When Eleven melted the Amy doppelganger, he was for all intents and purposes killing an exact copy of his best friend for no particular reason. Then there’s “The Girl Who Waited,” where he locks an older version of Amy out of the TARDIS to prevent two different time streams from merging, leaving her to be killed by robots.

  1. This isn’t even a doppelganger, but actually Amy, and he intentionally leads her to her death.
  2. You could say that he did it to protect the younger Amy from being erased from history and that one way or the other, an Amy was going to die that day, but it doesn’t really change the fact that The Doctor was the man who essentially pulled the trigger on which one survived (and tilted the odds in favor of it being the younger one, who hadn’t lost faith in him; see entry re: God above).

There has always been a darkness to The Doctor from the very beginning. It’s one of the things that make the character great, and often he cloaks that darkness in colorful clothes and contrived buffoonery. Sometimes, though, he lets it out, and none let it further out than the Eleventh Doctor.

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What is the longest single episode of Doctor Who?

90:23 – The longest episode of Doctor Who stands tall at a gargantuan ninety minutes and twenty-three seconds. While being the longest episode, The Daleks’ Master Plan is the longest story in Doctor Who history by being 12 episodes long. This is not counting the Key 2 Time/Trial of Time Lord Sagas which are treated merely as umbrella titles instead of actual stories.

Asked By: Raymond Diaz Date: created: Oct 13 2023

Should Dr Who be watched in order

Answered By: Evan Ramirez Date: created: Oct 14 2023

Where Should I Start? – The simple answer is: wherever you want. You probably want to start at the beginning of a season, as the modern trend is to work a bigger storyline through the episodes, but you should pick a Doctor that interests you and go onwards. Image credit: BBC The First Modern Doctor You could start with Christopher Eccleston’s season as the Ninth Doctor, the first modern season. Eccleston was an acclaimed actor before he joined the series, and his talent allows for a great depth of character and a slow reveal of the Doctor’s dark past.

  1. This run of the show was specifically meant to demonstrate what the new version of the series could do, so it’s a great starting point.
  2. In this series there are 13 episodes that culminate in a big showdown.
  3. You get futuristic science fiction as well as historical cameos (I love the bit where the Doctor confuses Charles Dickens by telling him he’s a big fan in ‘The Unquiet Dead’).

There are also alien invasions, a brand-new take on the Daleks, philosophical questions (should someone, given the chance, go back in time to save their father?), and the pansexual, life-loving Captain Jack (John Barrowman). The Best Modern Doctor Image credit: BBC David Tennant, the Tenth Doctor, is a favorite of mine, as he can do comedy, drama, adventure, and silliness. Some of the very best episodes were part of his run, including:

The Girl in the Fireplace, in which the Doctor meets Madame de Pompadour while encountering her at various times in her life. Blink, introduced the most recognizable modern villains, the Weeping Angels, statues that move when you’re not looking at them. Silence in the Library, a science fiction take on a slasher movie, where characters die one by one. This episode also gave us River Song (Alex Kingston). Human Nature, a heart-breaker where the Doctor becomes human in 1913 England to hide from a family of monsters. School Reunion features one of the very best companions from Classic Doctor Who, Sarah Jane Smith, played by Elisabeth Sladen. Plus, Anthony Head (Buffy the Vampire Slayer) plays an evil school headmaster.

The Classic Doctors If you like retro TV and want to sample the classic version with its dodgy special effects, slower pacing, and stagier direction (I find it all charming), then try these Doctors. The Best-Known Doctor Image credit: BBC Tom Baker was the Fourth Doctor, the one best known in the US before the modern series restarted. He played the role the longest, seven years from 1974-1981, and his distinctively elongated scarf gave his version of the Doctor a certain whimsy.

Part of Baker’s run veered into gothically tinged horror stories, and it was also during his run that much of the continuity about Time Lords and his home planet of Gallifrey was established. He captures the blend of wacky uncle and weird alien well. The Action Doctor If you like retro-flavored James Bond-style action, the Third Doctor, Jon Pertwee, is your man.

This version of the Doctor was, for the first part of his run, stuck on earth, without the ability to travel in time and space, so his adventures were structured around facing off against the Master (Roger Delgado), his Moriarty. Plus, Pertwee adored gadgets and vehicles, so you’ll get to see car chases and hovercrafts.

Asked By: Jeffery Hernandez Date: created: Nov 27 2023

When was Doctor Who most popular

Answered By: Eric Thomas Date: created: Nov 29 2023

What is the least viewed Doctor Who episode? – This was when the Doctor Who ratings went into a decline that they never recovered from, at least during the Classic run. Colin Baker’s last story ‘The Trial of a Time Lord’ opened with just 4.9 million viewers, hitting a low of 3.7 during its opening segment ‘The Mysterious Planet.’ And even the introduction of a new Time Lord in the shape of Sylvester McCoy couldn’t win back the gaze of the viewing public, although one important factor in this decline is the fact that Doctor Who – for the first time in its history – was scheduled opposite Coronation Street, Battlefield Of course, the Doctor Who ratings saw a surge when the programme returned under the guidance of Russell T Davies, with 10.8 million tuning in for the Ninth Doctor ‘s first episode. After this, we see a few ‘exceptions to the rule’ when it comes to the ratings.

Certainly, Doctor Who saw some of its best ever scores during the RTD era, but many of these were for Christmas specials such as ‘Voyage of the Damned’ which had a rating of 13.1 million, the highest New Who rating to date (matched by the subsequent special ‘The Next Doctor’) and the second highest viewing figure in the whole of 2007.

Then there are other specials such as ‘The End of Time’ parts one and two which performed excellently, with 11.6 million and 11.8 million apiece. And although these were Christmas and New Year specials, it’s likely that they’d have performed well anyway as they were the last to feature the Tenth Doctor David Tennant. The Stolen Earth and Journey’s End Incidentally, the lowest figure in the RTD era was for the Series Two episode ‘The Satan Pit’ which saw 6.1 million people tuning in. Meanwhile, the Doctor Who ratings began strongly for the Steven Moffat era in 2010, with 10.1 million tuning in for Matt Smith’s debut ‘The Eleventh Hour.’ As with Tennant, the viewing figures rose for the Christmas specials such as ‘A Christmas Carol’ (12.1 million) and ‘The Doctor, the Widow and the Wardrobe’ (10.8 million.) Matt Smith ended his run with ‘The Time of the Doctor’ – a Christmas special that saw 11.1 million people tuning in.

At the same time, the Matt Smith era possibly had the most impressive Doctor Who ratings of all time with 12.8 million people watching the 50th anniversary special ‘ The Day of the Doctor,’ although the final figure is probably much higher than this as it was simulcast around the world and screened in cinemas.

Indeed, the episode won a Guinness World Record for being the world’s largest ever simulcast of a TV drama, being shown in 94 countries simultaneously. Steven Moffat continued to oversee the programme into the Peter Capaldi era in 2014, and the Doctor Who ratings remained strong for the actor’s debut in ‘Deep Breath’ with some 9.2 million people tuning in. The Magician’s Apprentice As the Twelfth Doctor’s era progressed there were a couple more dips, with 4.7 million tuning in for the Series Ten episode ‘The Eaters of Light,’ which (at the time) was the lowest figure of New Who. However, the Doctor Who ratings improved for Peter Capaldi’s final story ‘Twice Upon a Time’ – which was also the last for showrunner Steven Moffat – with viewing figures of 7.9 million.

Asked By: Horace Rodriguez Date: created: May 07 2023

When did Doctor Who get canceled

Answered By: Howard Sanchez Date: created: May 07 2023

Episodes – Doctor Who originally ran for 26 seasons on BBC One, from 23 November 1963 until 6 December 1989. During the original run, each weekly episode formed part of a story (or “serial”)—usually of four to six parts in earlier years and three to four in later years.

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Some notable exceptions were: The Daleks’ Master Plan, which aired twelve episodes (plus an earlier one-episode teaser, ” Mission to the Unknown “, featuring none of the regular cast ); almost an entire season of seven-episode serials (season 7); the ten-episode serial The War Games ; and The Trial of a Time Lord, which ran for fourteen episodes (albeit divided into three production codes and four narrative segments) during season 23,

Occasionally, serials were loosely connected by a story line, such as season 8 focusing on the Doctor battling a rogue Time Lord called the Master, season 16 ‘s quest for the Key to Time, season 18 ‘s journey through E-Space and the theme of entropy, and season 20 ‘s Black Guardian trilogy.

  1. The programme was intended to be educational and for family viewing on the early Saturday evening schedule.
  2. It initially alternated stories set in the past, which taught younger audience members about history, and with those in the future or outer space, focusing on science.
  3. This was also reflected in the Doctor’s original companions, one of whom was a science teacher and another a history teacher.

However, science fiction stories came to dominate the programme, and the history-oriented episodes, which were not popular with the production team, were dropped after The Highlanders (1967). While the show continued to use historical settings, they were generally used as a backdrop for science fiction tales, with one exception: Black Orchid (1982), set in 1920s England.

The early stories were serialised in nature, with the narrative of one story flowing into the next and each episode having its own title, although produced as distinct stories with their own production codes. Following The Gunfighters (1966), however, each serial was given its own title, and the individual parts were assigned episode numbers.

Of the programme’s many writers, Robert Holmes was the most prolific, while Douglas Adams became the best known outside Doctor Who itself, due to the popularity of his Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy works. The serial format changed for the 2005 revival, with what was now called a series usually consisting of thirteen 45-minute, self-contained episodes (60 minutes with adverts, on overseas commercial channels) and an extended 60-minute episode broadcast on Christmas Day.

  • This system was shortened to twelve episodes and one Christmas special following the revival’s eighth series, and ten episodes from the eleventh series,
  • Each series includes standalone and multiple episodic stories, often linked with a loose story arc resolved in the series finale.
  • As in the early “classic” era, each episode has its own title, whether stand-alone or part of a larger story.

Occasionally, regular-series episodes will exceed the 45-minute run time; notably, the episodes ” Journey’s End ” from 2008 and ” The Eleventh Hour ” from 2010 exceeded an hour in length.871 Doctor Who instalments have been televised since 1963, ranging between 25-minute episodes (the most common format for the classic era), 45/50-minute episodes (for Resurrection of the Daleks in the 1984 series, a single season in 1985, and the most common format for the revival era since 2005), two feature-length productions (1983’s The Five Doctors and the 1996 television film ), twelve Christmas specials (most of approximately 60 minutes’ duration, one of 72 minutes), and four additional specials ranging from 60 to 75 minutes in 2009, 2010, and 2013.

Four mini-episodes, running about eight minutes each, were also produced for the 1993, 2005, and 2007 Children in Need charity appeals, while another mini-episode was produced in 2008 for a Doctor Who –themed edition of The Proms, The 1993 two-part story, entitled Dimensions in Time, was made in collaboration with the cast of the BBC soap-opera EastEnders and was filmed partly on the EastEnders set.

A two-part mini-episode was also produced for the 2011 edition of Comic Relief, Starting with the 2009 special ” Planet of the Dead “, the series was filmed in 1080i for HDTV and broadcast simultaneously on BBC One and BBC HD, To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the show, a special 3D episode, ” The Day of the Doctor “, was broadcast in 2013.

What is the lowest rated Doctor Who episode?

IMDb Rating: 4.2 – Hoping to finally get a vacation, the Thirteenth Doctor and her companions travel to a resort on Orphan 55, a strange planet with a terrifying secret and even more horrifying past. “Orphan 55” is the worst-rated episode in the entire show, being panned by both critics and fans alike.

Who is the most famous doctor?

1. Dr. Edward Jenner – “father of immunology” – Edward was famously known as the “father of immunology.” He was a British physician and scientist who pioneered the concept of vaccines, including creating the smallpox vaccine, the world’s first-ever vaccine.

  1. During his time, smallpox was responsible for the deaths of roughly 20% of the population.
  2. Jenner’s method of vaccination against smallpox grew in popularity and eventually replaced variolation, which had been the standard before his demonstration. Dr.
  3. Jenner and his work were said to have “saved more lives than the work of any other human.

By 1979, the World Health Organization declared that smallpox had been eradicated from the world.

What is the longest single episode of Doctor Who?

90:23 – The longest episode of Doctor Who stands tall at a gargantuan ninety minutes and twenty-three seconds. While being the longest episode, The Daleks’ Master Plan is the longest story in Doctor Who history by being 12 episodes long. This is not counting the Key 2 Time/Trial of Time Lord Sagas which are treated merely as umbrella titles instead of actual stories.