Asked By: Gavin Martinez Date: created: Oct 07 2023

Who vs whom examples sentences

Answered By: Alexander Gray Date: created: Oct 09 2023

Use who when the word is performing the action. Use whom when it is receiving the action. Kim is an athlete who enjoys distance running. Asher wrote a letter to a pen pal whom he had never met.

How do you use who and whom correctly?

Grammar 101: How to use who and whom correctly? The official IELTS by IDP app is here! today. How to use who and whom correctly? The answer is simple: If you can replace the word with “he” or “she” then you should use who. However, if you can replace it with “him” or “her,” use whom. Let’s look at some examples and do a who vs whom quiz. What’s the difference between who and whom? These are two words that cause a lot of confusion, even for,

So, it’s well worth taking a few minutes to know the difference between the two. Below, we’ve provided an easy guide on understanding the grammatical rules. We’ve also given some examples on how to use who and whom correctly. If you want to avoid mistakes in using who vs whom, read on. There are a few rules when you should use who and whom.

“Who” is a subjective pronoun. “Whom” is an objective pronoun. That simply means that “who” is always subject to a verb, and that “whom” is always working as an object in a sentence. We’ve explained what subjects and objects in a sentence are. But what does that mean? “Who,” the subjective pronoun, is the doer of an action.

Is it correct to say from whom?

The correct form is ‘from whom.’ This is because ‘whom’ follows a preposition (in this case, the preposition ‘from’). When a pronoun follows a preposition, the pronoun is an object of the preposition. ‘Who’ is a subject pronoun, not an object pronoun, so ‘who’ would never be correct following a preposition.

Asked By: Richard Cook Date: created: Mar 09 2024

Does anyone still use whom

Answered By: Fred Foster Date: created: Mar 11 2024

‘Who’ and ‘Whom’ and When to Use Them | Britannica Dictionary

Ask the Editor Question What is the difference between ‘who’ and ‘whom’ and when should I use them? — Learners Everywhere Answer

Who is a subject pronoun. Whom is an object pronoun. However, whom is not often used anymore, especially in casual or informal speech or writing. It is occasionally used in very formal speech or writing, or in set idiomatic phrases such as “To Whom It May Concern.” In ordinary speech and writing whom can seem unnatural. Below are some examples of how who and whom are used. As a subject pronoun:

Who will be at the party? I didn’t know who to call when my car broke down. Who knows when they’ll return? Who is that at the door?

As an object pronoun:

He only tells those to whom he is closest. = He only tells those whom/who he is closest to. The bookstore was having an event for an author whom / who I was excited to meet. To whom did you speak when you called? = Whom/who did you speak to when you called?

In very formal speech or writing, you can use whom in object position, and it may even be recommended by some teachers. However, know that in casual or ordinary speech and writing, who is fine as a subject or an object. I hope this helps. For more posts about words, idioms, grammar, and usage, like us on and follow us on ! Don’t forget to to our Word of the Day e-mails! Click to try one of our vocabulary quizzes before you go! You can read more articles in the,

How do you use whom?

Whom is used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition. When in doubt, try this simple trick: If you can replace the word with he or she, use who, If you can replace it with him or her, use whom,

Who should be used to refer to the subject of a sentence. Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition.

Who or whom ? If you’re like most English speakers, you know that there’s a difference between these pronouns, but you aren’t sure what that difference is. After reading this article, you may conclude that knowing when to use which one is not as difficult as you thought.

Asked By: Adrian Moore Date: created: Aug 31 2023

When did I use whom

Answered By: James Butler Date: created: Sep 01 2023

Grammar 101: How to use who and whom correctly? The official IELTS by IDP app is here! today. How to use who and whom correctly? The answer is simple: If you can replace the word with “he” or “she” then you should use who. However, if you can replace it with “him” or “her,” use whom. Let’s look at some examples and do a who vs whom quiz. What’s the difference between who and whom? These are two words that cause a lot of confusion, even for,

  1. So, it’s well worth taking a few minutes to know the difference between the two.
  2. Below, we’ve provided an easy guide on understanding the grammatical rules.
  3. We’ve also given some examples on how to use who and whom correctly.
  4. If you want to avoid mistakes in using who vs whom, read on.
  5. There are a few rules when you should use who and whom.
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“Who” is a subjective pronoun. “Whom” is an objective pronoun. That simply means that “who” is always subject to a verb, and that “whom” is always working as an object in a sentence. We’ve explained what subjects and objects in a sentence are. But what does that mean? “Who,” the subjective pronoun, is the doer of an action.

What is an example of whom?

How to use whom – Whom is a pronoun that acts as the object of a verb or preposition (often the person that is acted upon). Examples: Whom as the object of a verb or preposition From whom did we receive these flowers? There’s no one whom I love more. It can also be used as a relative pronoun to connect a relative clause to a main clause.

Is it attention to who or whom?

‘ to whom attention ‘ is a correct and usable part of a sentence in written English. You can use it to refer to a person to whom special attention should be paid, such as in the following example: ‘We awarded the scholarship to the student to whom attention deservedly goes.’.

Who or whom do you look like?

Yes – And you can tell that it is the right way bc if you turn the sentence around you would say, “Do I look like him?” Or “Do I look like her?” Whom stands in for Him / Her and Who stands in for He / She. I believe He / She / Who are called subject pronouns. And Him / Her / Whom are object pronouns.

Asked By: Douglas Hayes Date: created: Mar 05 2024

Who I miss or whom I miss

Answered By: Leonars Wilson Date: created: Mar 07 2024

The part of a sentence ‘ whom I miss ‘ is correct and usable in written English. You can use it when talking about someone who is absent or not present. For example: ‘My grandfather passed away last year and I still miss him terribly; he was someone whom I miss dearly’.

Asked By: Dominic Peterson Date: created: Feb 23 2023

Is whom always singular

Answered By: Herbert Hughes Date: created: Feb 25 2023

Answer and Explanation: The word ‘whom’ is a pronoun that can replace a singular or plural noun. ‘Whom’ is only used as the object of a sentence or as a preposition. Both of the following sentences are correct: ‘I like the people with whom I am staying.’

Who or whom do you speak to?

‘Whom are you talking to?’ is correct : you is the subject, and whom (objective case) is the direct object. But ‘Who are you talking to?’ isn’t wrong; it’s just colloquial. There’s a trend over past decades in colloquial speech to ignore the who/whom distinction and use who exclusively.

Is whom used in modern English?

Who and whom Whom is the object form of the relative pronoun who, Both who and whom are only used to refer to people. Students are often confused about whom. If you don’t know how exactly is whom used, don’t worry. In modern English, whom is considered rather formal and old-fashioned.

You were speaking to a woman. She is my boss.

Here the noun woman is the object of the preposition to. We can combine these two clauses using whom,

The woman to whom you were speaking is my boss.

Good to know When a relative pronoun is used as the object of the verb, it will be immediately followed by another noun.In the above example, the noun you follows the relative pronoun whom. In a less formal style, we can also write:

The woman who you were speaking to is my boss.

Note that the preposition now goes at the end of the clause ‘who you were speaking to’. In an informal style, the relative pronoun who can be dropped and the sentence will still make sense.

The woman you were speaking to is my boss.

: Who and whom

Why do people confuse who and whom?

Since whom is rarely and inconsistently used, most people don’t have enough exposure to it to get a good sense of when it’s used. Most people (including most English teachers, most popular grammar and style writers, etc.)

Asked By: Joshua Gonzales Date: created: Mar 26 2023

What’s another word for whom

Answered By: Samuel Henderson Date: created: Mar 28 2023

Synonyms: who, he who, she who, the one who, the person who, more

Asked By: Kevin Peterson Date: created: Jul 31 2023

What do you mean by whom

Answered By: Hugh Ward Date: created: Jul 31 2023

Whom is the object form of who. We use whom to refer to people in formal styles or in writing, when the person is the object of the verb.

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Is who or whom plural?

‘Who’ does not inflect for number: it is always ‘who’ as the subject of a clause and ‘whom’ in all other contexts, whether its antecedent is singular or plural.

Asked By: Ethan Reed Date: created: Apr 15 2023

Who or whom did you kiss

Answered By: Miles Howard Date: created: Apr 18 2023

How and when to use ‘whom’ instead of ‘who’ A free daily digest of the biggest news stories of the day – and the best features from our website Thank you for signing up to TheWeek. You will receive a verification email shortly. There was a problem. Please refresh the page and try again.

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  • Wired recently came out with of dating site profile factors that correlate with greater success, and guess what: that girl who you’re trying to impress is more likely to go for you if she’s that girl whom you’re trying to impress.

Yup, use of whom in a guy’s profile correlates with 31 percent more contacts from the opposite sex. Why would use of whom matter? Presumably because it’s associated with more intelligent use of grammar, and it turns out that women tend to value intelligence in men.

  1. But if you’re going to use whom, you have to use it correctly.
  2. You can’t say “Whom is going with you?” because she might know that that’s wrong.
  3. The problem here is that most of us do not use whom in regular speech.
  4. It’s no more natural to most modern English speakers than the proper use of –eth conjugations and thou pronouns.

It’s almost a foreign word. It just seems like who with a bowtie on it. Escape your echo chamber. Get the facts behind the news, plus analysis from multiple perspectives. From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

  1. From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.
  2. Here’s the simple rule on where to use whom rather than who : Every verb that is conjugated (e.g., I kiss, She kisses) has to have a subject : I kiss her, She kisses me, I want to kiss her, She is kissed by me.

The rule is that you use who when it’s the subject and whom when it’s not. So look around at the conjugated verbs in the sentence. Are all their subjects spoken for? If so, use whom, If not, look for which one the who is the subject of just to double check, and use who,

  • Think: “Subject? Oo.
  • Object? Mm.” For those who aren’t always clear on what the subject of a verb is, here are a few other ways to think about it.
  • If it’s in a question, and the answer could be him or her, use whom ; if the answer could be he or she, use who,
  • Whom are you kissing?” “I’m kissing him,” ” Who is kissing you?” ” She is kissing me.” If it’s in a relative clause (a sentence embedded in another sentence), look for another noun or pronoun between who(m) and the verb.

If there is one, that will be the subject and you should use whom : “She is the person whom you are kissing.” If there isn’t one, who will normally be the subject: “She is the person who is kissing you.” If it’s after a preposition ( to, from, for, of, by, etc.), use whom : “You are the person to whom I am speaking”; “She is the one for whom I bought the lip gloss”; “From whom did you get that idea?” But see below about whomever for an exception.

If there’s a clause introduced by a verb about thinking, saying, believing, or something like that, look very carefully to see what the subject of the clause is. Take for example “Who(m) did you think kissed her?” There are two conjugated verbs: did and kissed ( think is an infinitive). The subject for did is you,

What’s the subject for kissed? Not you – it’s taken by did. Not her – it’s the object of kissed. No, it’s who : “Who did you think kissed her?” Don’t bother saying “It has to be whom because it’s the object of think.” The actual object of think is the whole clause “whokissed her.” So now try “Who(m) did she say he kissed?” What are the conjugated verbs? Did and kissed.

  1. What are the subjects? She and he,
  2. We don’t need another subject.
  3. So it’s “Whom did she say he kissed?” The rules for how to use whomever are the same as for whom : Subject? Oo.
  4. Object? Mm.
  5. There is a bit of a risk of getting fooled by a preposition, though.
  6. Look at a sentence such as “I’ll give a kiss to who(m)ever wants one.” You see the to and may think, “OK, preposition before, so it must be whomever,” But no! Look at that verb wants.

What’s the subject? It’s whoever, But the complement of a preposition is always an object, so why is it not whomever ? Because the whole clause is the complement: “I’ll give a kiss to,” Of course if something else is the subject of the verb, you use whomever : “I’ll give a kiss to whomever I like.” Now, then.

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Let’s look at all the whom examples above and see if any of them are confusing if we just leave the bowtie at home and use who or whoever : “Who are you kissing?” “The person who you are kissing.” “Who did she say she kissed?” “I’ll give a kiss to whoever I like.” Uh, yup. Every one of them perfectly clear.

Generally less stuffy too. So is that extra m just a torture device like a too-tight collar and hard-to-tie bowtie? Here’s why we have it. English nouns used to have a thing called case inflection. What this means (in simplified terms) is that every noun would have different forms depending on whether it was subject, direct object, indirect object, or possessor (or source), for singular and plural.

Many other languages have this — German and Russian both do. It was sort of like if we were to add –em to all objects: “Mary kissed John-em” and “John kissed Mary-em” — we could change the order and it would still be clear: “John-em kissed Mary” would mean Mary was the kisser and John the kissee. But over the centuries we simplified all that.

Now the only difference for normal nouns is that we have –s for possession and for plural (we use an apostrophe to mark the difference in writing, but of course we say them the same). Instead of marking the grammatical relations between words that way, we just use word order, which has to be more consistent as a result.

But we kept some of the difference for pronouns: We have to say “He kissed her” and not “Him kissed her” or “He kissed she.” We generally manage to keep this straight, and even though it rarely actually adds clarity we stick to it because it’s what we do. We kept it from before. It’s a family heirloom.

Well, whom is like him : it’s a family heirloom (and a pronoun). It’s one of those heirlooms that don’t get used very often. Most of us bring it out just for special guests and fine company. So we’re not very used to it. But it’s still useful — for signifying that we’re treating the other person like fine company. Continue reading for free We hope you’re enjoying The Week’s refreshingly open-minded journalism. Subscribed to The Week? Register your account with the same email as your subscription. : How and when to use ‘whom’ instead of ‘who’

Asked By: Oswald Rogers Date: created: Oct 15 2023

Do we say whom am I

Answered By: Philip Davis Date: created: Oct 18 2023

In formal English, ‘to whom am I speaking’ would be correct. ‘Whom’ is the objective form of ‘who,’ and ‘whom’ is the object of the preposition ‘to’ in the sentence ‘to whom am I speaking? Use whom when you could replace it with him.

Asked By: Ralph Cook Date: created: Aug 10 2023

Who vs whom after a comma

Answered By: Noah Robinson Date: created: Aug 10 2023

Comma Queen: Who/Whom for Dummies June 8, 2015 “Who” and “whom” are relative pronouns, and the trick for choosing the right one is to switch the clause around so that you can substitute a personal pronoun. Personal pronouns have a property called case. “I,” “he,” “she,” “we,” and “they” are in the nominative case, and function as subjects of a sentence or a clause.

“Me,” “him,” “her,” “us,” and “them” are in the objective case, and are used as direct objects, indirect objects, and objects of a preposition. Your ear will tell you which personal pronoun is correct. Then all you have to know is that “who” is nominative and “whom” is objective. When you put the sentence back together, you use “who” if the pronoun was in the nominative case and “whom” if it was in the objective case.

“Who” is to “he” as “whom” is to “him,” etc. Try it at home—it’s safe and easy! View more episodes of “.” : Comma Queen: Who/Whom for Dummies

Is who or whom plural?

‘Who’ does not inflect for number: it is always ‘who’ as the subject of a clause and ‘whom’ in all other contexts, whether its antecedent is singular or plural.

Asked By: Walter Coleman Date: created: Sep 13 2023

What are the 10 examples of relative pronoun

Answered By: Noah Flores Date: created: Sep 15 2023

There is a specific list of relative pronouns, and here they are: who, whoever, whom, whomever, that, which, when, where, and whose. (Sometimes, what, which, and where can serve as relative pronouns.)

Who are you talking to or whom are you talking to?

‘Whom are you talking to?’ is correct : you is the subject, and whom (objective case) is the direct object. But ‘Who are you talking to?’ isn’t wrong; it’s just colloquial. There’s a trend over past decades in colloquial speech to ignore the who/whom distinction and use who exclusively.

Asked By: Brian Lee Date: created: Aug 13 2023

Is it to who or to whom it may concern

Answered By: Ashton Adams Date: created: Aug 14 2023

Is It Who, Whom, or Whomever It May Concern? – The correct phrase should always be “To Whom It May Concern,” not “To Who It May Concern” or “To Whomever It May Concern,” which are both grammatically incorrect.