Asked By: Hunter Green Date: created: Sep 16 2023

What is the meaning of Romans 8 31

Answered By: Angel Nelson Date: created: Sep 19 2023

DISCLOSURE: This post may contain affliliate links, meaning I get a small commission if you decide to make a purchase through my links. This is at no cost to you and helps keep Rethink up and running. “What, then, shall we say in response to these things? If God is for us, who can be against us? ” Romans 8:31 This verse offers incredible encouragement to Christians on this side of heaven.

Though we face trails, difficulties, and suffering this verse reminds us that God is with us and for us. The meaning of Romans 8:31 is one that we should hang on to. However, we often forget this powerful truth when we are faced with life’s challenges. I think this verse deserves a closer look. If you spend a few minutes reading and dwelling on this passage I believe your life and faith will be encouraged.

Let’s dive into the Romans 8:31 meaning.

What is the saying if God is for us who can be against us?

When it comes to Christian theology, just about all roads lead through Romans. Paul’s letter to the Romans is arguably the single most important piece of literature in the history of the world. And chapter 8 is perhaps its greatest section. And Romans 8:31–39 is the climax.

It is actually an inference from everything Paul says in Romans 5:1–8:30 about the glorious results of our justification. It’s as if the apostle takes a deep breath as he thinks back over Romans 5:1–8:30, and then asks God’s people, “What then shall we say to these things? If God is for us, who can be against us?” (Rom.8:31).

That second question is rhetorical, so it has the force of a proposition: Since God is for us, nothing can be against us, Paul then supports what he asserts with four proofs.1

Asked By: Brandon Murphy Date: created: Sep 26 2023

What is Romans 8 39 31

Answered By: Martin Baker Date: created: Sep 29 2023

Romans 8:31-39 NIV – What, then, shall we say in response to these things? If God is for us, who can be against us? He who did not spare his own Son, but gave him up for us all—how will he not also, along with him, graciously give us all things? Who will bring any charge against those whom God has chosen? It is God who justifies.

  • Who then is the one who condemns? No one.
  • Christ Jesus who died—more than that, who was raised to life—is at the right hand of God and is also interceding for us.
  • Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall trouble or hardship or persecution or famine or nakedness or danger or sword? As it is written: “For your sake we face death all day long; we are considered as sheep to be slaughtered.” No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us.

For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

Asked By: Ian Sanders Date: created: Apr 12 2023

What is Romans 31 to 39

Answered By: Fred Cook Date: created: Apr 12 2023

Romans 8:31–39 Teaches Us that God is For Us – If he is for you, then nothing can stand against you. He’s given his Son for you. And not just in the past. Jesus, the risen Son of God right now is at the right hand of God interceding for you. And nothing in this world can separate you from his love for you.

Not tribulation, not distress. Nothing that you are facing in your life can separate you from his love. And not only nothing can separate you from his love, but nothing can take away the fact that you are a conqueror today through him who loves you. You are not defeated. You are a victor in Jesus. Whatever trial, or tribulation you are facing, you know that in the end you win by the power of Jesus in you and the power of God’s love for you that nothing in this world can ever separate you from.

Oh God, we praise you for Romans 8:31–39. We praise you, Holy Spirit, for inspiring Paul to write these words in a way that thousands of years later in this moment, you would encourage our hearts with them amidst whatever we’re walking through. God, we praise you for being for us, for all who trust in you for being, for us, with us.

What is Colossians 3 17?

Colossians 3:17 NIV – And whatever you do, whether in word or deed, do it all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him.

Asked By: Noah Davis Date: created: Sep 09 2023

What is Luke 1 37

Answered By: Eric Gonzales Date: created: Sep 10 2023

Luke 1:37 – For no word from God will ever fail.”. Luke 1:37 For with God nothing shall be impossible, ] That is consistent with his nature and perfections, with his counsels, purposes, and promises: every thing that he has said, purposed, or promised, he is able to do, and will; every word that he has spoken, every thing predicted by his prophets, or declared by his angels, and particularly this of a virgin’s conceiving and bearing a Son: so that the angel not only answers her question, how this should be, but confirms her faith in it; partly by the instance of her cousin Elisabeth, and partly by observing the infinite omnipotence of God.

Asked By: Roger Taylor Date: created: Dec 11 2022

What does Romans 8 31 mean by if God is for us who can be against us

Answered By: Alejandro Miller Date: created: Dec 14 2022

‘If God is For Us, Who Can Be Against Us’ Meaning – This Bible verse is meant as encouragement to not fear the forces and things of this world that are against God and His people. “The Lord is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? The Lord is the stronghold of my life; of whom shall I be afraid?” ( Psalm 27:1 ) Got Questions gives an explanation of this phrase, saying: God is “for” us in the sense that He is on our side; He is working on our behalf and for our good.

He has proved His benevolence in that He has adopted us ( Romans 8:15 ), He has given us His Spirit ( Romans 8:16-17, 8:26-27 ), and He has determined to save us ( 8:29-30 ). The follow-up question, “who can be against us?” is rhetorical. It’s another way of saying, “There is no one who could possibly be more powerful than God” or “No one can destroy us.” The idea is not that we will never face opposition; it’s simply that our opposition is doomed to failure.

They may be against us, but not successfully against us. Since God is on our side, we have nothing to worry about. Romans 8:31 is a harkening of other similar Bible passages: “The LORD is with me; I will not be afraid. What can mere mortals do to me?” ~ Psalm 118:6 “‘Don’t be afraid,’ the prophet answered.

What does Romans 8 32 mean?

What Does the Phrase “All Things” Mean in Romans 8:32? by Derek Thomas “He who did not spare his own Son but gave him up for us all, how will he not also with him graciously give us all things?” (Rom.8:32) The love of the Father expressed in the sacrifice of the Son achieves “all things” for those God loves.

What exactly does the phrase “all things” mean? The answer lies in the previous verses: God in His providence is working “all things” together in order to achieve a specific goal—our glorification (Rom.8:28, 30). Everything that happens to us is designed to ensure that God’s plan—foreknowledge-predestination-calling-justification-glorification—is brought about.

“All things” refers to the final, complete fruition of our redemption in glory. The gospel guarantees that we will be brought home to glory. It is by grace that we are saved from the consequences of our sin; the same grace of God in the gospel brings us home.

  • Better, Jesus brings us home.
  • Our salvation is bound up not in something intangible and impersonal, but in a person—in Jesus Christ.
  • The grace that ensures our final glorification is the grace of God in Jesus Christ.
  • Our salvation is bound up not in something intangible and impersonal, but in a person—in Jesus Christ The gospel—the good news (Greek, euangelion )—is that God has provided for sinners like me a Substitute, One who takes my place and bears the consequences of my sin.

At the cross, the wrath that my sins deserve was poured out on the Substitute. Justice was satisfied and atonement was given. My sins were imputed to the Substitute; His righteousness (obedi”ence) was imputed to my account. I received the benefits of the cross by faith alone,

Who is the Substitute? He is Jesus, my Savior. Because Paul saw the cross as central to the gospel, he could say, “We preach Christ crucified” (1 Cor.1:23). And again, “I decided to know nothing among you except Jesus Christ and him crucified” (1 Cor.2:2). And again, “I delivered to you as of first importance what I also received: that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the Scriptures” (1 Cor.15:3).

The cross was of ” first importance.” : What Does the Phrase “All Things” Mean in Romans 8:32? by Derek Thomas

Asked By: Christian Harris Date: created: Sep 08 2022

Does God need us to fight for him

Answered By: Bruce Turner Date: created: Sep 09 2022

Implications for Our Worship – Now that we have seen that aseity is affirmed in Scripture, what implications does it have for the God we worship? What implications does it have for our salvation? In Psalm 50 and Isaiah 40 we learn that God is not like the pagan gods of the surrounding nations.

These gods are fashioned by man (Isa.40:19-20). Using much satire, Isaiah explains that the same wood used by man to keep himself warm and cook his food by fire he also uses to form a god so that he can bow down to it in worship, praying “Save me; you are my god” (Isa.44:15-17). This is not a God who saves but a God you must save.

“In this way,” Frame writes, “the Lord mocks worship in which the god is dependent on the worshiper, in which the worshiper meets the god’s needs” ( Doctrine of God, 606). In contrast, Paul describes the Lord in Acts 17:24-30 not as a creature but as the Creator.

Paul is emphatic: God is not worshiped by us “as if he needed anything.” True, biblical worship is due to God not because he needs us, but because we need him. As Frame observes, it is the case that God is worshiped by men’s hands, “but the hands are raised in praise and thanksgiving, not to supply the needs of God” ( Doctrine of God, 606).

Consider the words of the 24 elders who fall down before the throne of God, worshiping him, casting their crowns before him saying, “Worthy are you, our Lord and God, to receive glory and honor and power, for you created all things, and by your will they existed and were created” (Rev.4:11).

  1. If God is not independent of us, he is not worthy, qualified, or able to save us let alone to receive worship and praise.
  2. If God is not a se, then he is weak and pathetic.
  3. He may be a God like us, but he is not a God better than us,
  4. He may be a God in our world, but he is not a God distinct from our world.

And all of this relates to the gospel for, as Michael Horton says, “If God were not free from creation, we might pray for him, but not to him” (, 235). It is precisely because God is free from creation that he is able to enter into creation in order to save lost sinners (Eph.1:7-8).

There are two dangers that need to be avoided in this discussion. First, one could conclude that we do not matter to God if he does not need us. Second, one could also conclude that God is not relational if he is independent of us. But both of these conclusions would be wrong. While God does not need us and is in no way obligated to enter into a relationship with us, he created us in his image and made us to have fellowship with him (Gen.1-2).

We matter because God determined that we would be meaningful. Even when sin ruined and destroyed our fellowship and access to him (Gen.3), he voluntarily entered into a saving covenant relationship with us, though he was in no way obligated to save us.

  1. He has every right to condemn us for all eternity (Matt.25:41).
  2. But God, being rich in mercy, because of the great love with which he loved us, even when we were dead in our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ-by grace you have been saved” (Eph.2:4-5).
  3. The gospel depends on a God who does not depend on you.
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What this means for us, as believers, is nothing short of amazing: While God does not need us, he has given us the privilege of serving him. We would not have it any other way. : The Gospel Depends on a God Who Does Not Depend on You

Asked By: Curtis Carter Date: created: Jan 10 2023

What is Philippians 4 13

Answered By: Reginald Nelson Date: created: Jan 12 2023

Philippians 4:13 is one of the most well-known New Testament verses, but it’s also notoriously misused. After telling his audience that he’s experienced both poverty and affluence, the Apostle Paul writes these well-known words: “I can do all things through Him who strengthens me.” Many of us have seen some variation of these words in encouraging notes and cards, in art, on t-shirts, tattooed on people’s bodies, and even scrawled on the shoes of famous athletes or printed on their eye black.

The verse is often shortened to, “I can do all things,,” But is that what Paul is really saying here? Is he telling us to believe in ourselves? Or to believe that Christ empowers us to do whatever we set our minds to? No. By submitting your email address, you understand that you will receive email communications from HarperCollins Christian Publishing (501 Nelson Place, Nashville, TN 37214 USA) providing information about products and services of HCCP and its affiliates.

You may unsubscribe from these email communications at any time. If you have any questions, please review our Privacy Policy or email us at [email protected],

Asked By: Miguel Evans Date: created: Oct 08 2023

What is Romans 8 14 easy

Answered By: Anthony White Date: created: Oct 09 2023

We can live by God’s Spirit – 1 Now we know this: God has forgiven those people who are united with Christ Jesus. God will never say that they are guilty,2 If you belong to Christ Jesus, God’s Spirit has given you a new life. God’s Spirit now rules in your life and he has made you free.

Sin and death no longer have authority over you.3 The Law that God gave to Moses could not make us free like that. We were too weak to obey his Law because we are human. But God has done what his Law could not do. He sent his own Son to become a person like us. His human body was like the body of people who do wrong things.

God’s Son died as a sacrifice to take away the punishment for our sins, In that way, God destroyed the power of sin over people who are weak and human.4 God did this so that we could become right with him. God’s Law showed us how to be right with him.

And now we can be right with God, if we live with God’s Spirit as our guide. We do not do what our weak human thoughts want us to do.5 Some people do what their weak human thoughts want them to do. They think about the things that will make themselves happy. But people who live with God’s Spirit as their guide think about what will make God’s Spirit happy.6 People who let their human thoughts rule them will die.

But people who think about what God’s Spirit wants will have life with God. They will have peace inside themselves.7 If our weak human thoughts rule us, we become God’s enemies. People like that do not want to obey God’s Law. They are not even able to obey it.8 People who let their human thoughts rule them cannot make God happy.9 But you are not like that.

You no longer obey your weak human thoughts. Instead, you obey God’s Spirit as your guide. That is true if God’s Spirit is really living in you. But if anyone does not have Christ’s Spirit in them, that person does not belong to Christ.10 But, if Christ lives in you, you have a new life because of his Spirit.

Your body will die one day because of the power of sin, But your spirit lives because Christ has made you right with God.11 God raised Jesus, to make him alive again after his death. Now God’s Spirit lives in you. So God, who raised Christ from death, will also cause your human bodies to live again.

He will do that by his Spirit who lives in you.12 So, my Christian friends, we must not obey what our weak human thoughts tell us to do. We no longer have to live like that.13 If you agree to live in that way, you will die. Instead, you should let God’s Spirit help you with his power. Then you can stop doing the wrong things that your bodies want to do.

As a result, you will have life with God.14 All those people who live with God’s Spirit as their guide are God’s children.15 The Spirit that you have received from God does not make you serve him like slaves. That would make you afraid again. No. The Spirit that God has given to you causes you to become God’s children.

Now he takes care of you. God’s Spirit makes us call God: ‘ Abba, our Father.’ 16 God’s Spirit himself causes us to know that we are God’s children. God’s Spirit and our own spirits agree that this is true.17 Because we are God’s children, we also know that we will receive good things from him. Those are the things that he has promised to give to his children.

Together with Christ, we will receive the things that God has kept for him. That is true if we agree to have troubles like Christ did. Then we will also enjoy life in heaven like Christ does.

Asked By: Cole Morgan Date: created: Aug 28 2022

What is the meaning of John 3 31

Answered By: Tyler Thomas Date: created: Aug 28 2022

Bible Version Book ESV He who comes from above is above all. He who is of the earth belongs to the earth and speaks in an earthly way. He who comes from heaven is above all. NIV The one who comes from above is above all; the one who is from the earth belongs to the earth, and speaks as one from the earth.

  • The one who comes from heaven is above all.
  • NASB He who comes from above is above all; the one who is only from the earth is of the earth and speaks of the earth.
  • He who comes from heaven is above all.
  • CSB The one who comes from above is above all.
  • The one who is from the earth is earthly and speaks in earthly terms.

The one who comes from heaven is above all. NLT He has come from above and is greater than anyone else. We are of the earth, and we speak of earthly things, but he has come from heaven and is greater than anyone else. KJV He that cometh from above is above all: he that is of the earth is earthly, and speaketh of the earth: he that cometh from heaven is above all.

Context Summary John 3:31–36 describes how Jesus’ ministry is from God, but almost everyone will reject it. Verse 36 is an important footnote to the core gospel message, seen in John 3:16–21, Those who put their faith in Christ will be saved, but those who reject Him will face the wrath of God. This passage emphasizes the exclusivity of the gospel: there is absolutely no other way to obtain heaven, but through Jesus Christ.

“Testimony,” and the need to believe it, are also crucial in this text. Expand Chapter Summary John chapter 3 is one of the most important in the entire gospel. Many crucial ideas are explained in this passage, including the role of Jesus as Savior. After the loud, public commotion at the temple, John transitions to a quiet, nighttime discussion. BibleRef.com is a ministry of

What is Matthew 19 17?

Matthew 19:17 in Other Translations there is none good but one, that is, God: but if thou wilt enter into life, keep the commandments.17 And he said to him, ‘Why do you ask me about what is good? There is only one who is good. If you would enter life, keep the commandments.’

What does Matthew 5 17 say?

ESV ‘ Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them.

What is Ephesians 4 32?

There are many lines in the Bible that are packed with meaning. One example comes from Ephesians 4:32: “Be kind and compassionate to one another, forgiving each other, just as in Christ God has forgiven you.” In this sentence, Paul has summarized the biblical message: that we are to be kind, compassionate and forgiving.

  • In other places, the gospel is summarized in other ways.
  • In Deuteronomy 6:5, we are taught, “Love the Lord your God with all your heart and soul and mind,” and in Leviticus 19:18, “Love your neighbor as yourself,” which is repeated throughout the gospels and the epistles.
  • In the gospels, Jesus says these two commands sum up the whole law (Matthew 22:40).

Jesus also said, according to John’s (15:13) gospel, “there is no greater love than to lay down one’s life for a friend.” Or Paul, in the Epistle to the Romans, writes, “Therefore, I urge you, brothers and sisters, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as living sacrifices, holy, and pleasing to God, this is your spiritual act of worship” (Romans 12:1).

  1. But it is not love or sacrifice explicitly that is presented here in this verse in Ephesians, but grace.
  2. The translators have chosen “forgiving and forgiven.” Yet, the primary word for forgiveness is absent in this command to forgive.
  3. Instead, the term ordinarily associated with grace appears.
  4. The word, “grace,” is one of the Bible’s more remarkable words.

It is multifaceted, a little like the Hebrew word, “hesed,” often translated “steadfast love,” but can be defined only by a litany of expressions, no one word or phrase is able to carry the freight. It is the same with grace, which means goodwill, favor; the expression of favor that is associated with giving a gift.

  • It is one of the words used to convey the state of being blessed, or happy, very close to “joy,” and it is the same root imbedded in the concept of gratitude.
  • Once it is even used when Jesus healed the blind (see Luke 7:21).
  • And it does imply mercy, is one of the Bible’s words for forgiveness.
  • Conversely, the underlying principle that governs the way people often behave is something like the so-called survival instinct: look out for yourself, no one else will; don’t trust anyone; if you want something done right, do it yourself; do whatever it takes to survive.

There is a stark contrast between “anything to survive self-concern and a divine love that sacrifices, and it is with that contrast that we are confronted. It is to a life of service and sacrifice that we are called. “Grace” is one of the catch-all words for this calling.

  1. In the English language, the noun “grace” is not accompanied with an associated verb.
  2. But in the original language and in this verse, that is exactly what is found, the verbal form with the same root.
  3. It is an action, and a rich and varied one at that, one that can only be defined by a litany of expressions; giving generously, having gratitude and mercy, healing, serving, sacrificing and forgiving.

The translators had to choose one word from among several possibilities, and they chose “forgiving,” but it means more than that. I have taken the liberty to create a verb in English, even if only for the purpose of this day’s reflection. The term is “gracing.” Let me restate this sentence using this new verb, keeping in mind the rich variety of meanings imbedded in it. https://www.delgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/40/2021/10/web1_MARK-ALLISON.jpg

Asked By: Joshua Kelly Date: created: Nov 04 2023

What is Ephesians 2 10

Answered By: Logan Jones Date: created: Nov 07 2023

Bible Version Book ESV For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them. NIV For we are God’s handiwork, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do.

NASB For we are His workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand so that we would walk in them. CSB For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared ahead of time for us to do. NLT For we are God’s masterpiece. He has created us anew in Christ Jesus, so we can do the good things he planned for us long ago.

KJV For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them. Context Summary Ephesians 2:1–10 clearly explains the relationship between our lack of obedience, the grace of God, and our salvation.

Those who are saved by Christ do not deserve this salvation. It is only by mercy, and by grace, that God chooses to forgive. In this section, Paul will repeat the claim that human effort has no impact on salvation whatsoever. No Christian can brag about their ”goodness,” since we are saved entirely by the grace of God, not by our own good deeds.

Expand Chapter Summary Paul repeatedly emphasizes that salvation is accomplished on the basis of grace, through faith. Good works, human effort, and our best intentions will never be enough to earn salvation. Every person is marked with sin, both deliberate and accidental, and for this reason we deserve to be separated from God. BibleRef.com is a ministry of

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What is Ephesians 5 20?

Some Questions About Prayer from Ephesians 5:20 Ephesians 5:20 reveals that, once filled with the Spirit, we should be “always giving thanks to God the Father for everything, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ.” This verse sparks several questions: 1) How can we give thanks “always”? That seems impossible.2) Should we really thank God for “everything”? Really? 3) Does this verse teach that we should always end our prayers by saying “in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ”? When I was writing, I gave plenty of thought to these questions.

  • Here’s what I came up with: identifies one of the most common and appropriate expressions of worship: thanksgiving.
  • Whether in song or speech, when we are filled with the Spirit, we will offer expressions of gratitude to God.
  • We do this “in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ” (5:20), that is, under the authority of Christ and for his purposes.

It does not mean that every prayer of gratitude must end with the words “in Jesus’s name,” though this practice can be a helpful reminder that all of our prayers should be offered under Christ’s lordship and for his sake. Always (5:20). How should we thank God “always”? It’s unlikely that Paul means giving intentional, verbal thanks every single waking moment.

  • Surely there were times when his verbal skills were focused on something other than forming prayers of gratitude.
  • I believe Paul meant at least two things when he said we should be “always giving thanks.” First, this verse encourages us to pause often in the midst of our busy lives to perceive God’s gifts and thank him for them.

Second, Ephesians 5:20 urges us to develop an inner perspective of gratitude, to live each moment with an awareness of the blessings we have from God and our debt to him. We may also wonder what it means to thank God “for everything.” Are we to thank the Lord for heresy and falsehood? For depression and death? For despair and darkness? Common sense suggests that we should not thank God for that which is contrary to God’s own will.

  1. In 1 John 1:5, for example, we read that “God is light; in him there is no darkness at all.” So if we thank God for moral and spiritual darkness, we are giving him false credit for that which is evil and risking outright blasphemy.
  2. But we should also realize that apparently bad things turn out to be parts of God’s good plan.

God even uses human evil for his providential purposes. In Genesis we read that Joseph suffered many terrible things, including attempted murder by his own brothers, being sold into slavery, false accusation, abuse of power, and unwarranted imprisonment.

  • As he was rotting in jail, Joseph may not have been ready to pray, “Lord, thank you that I am rotting in jail.” But in retrospect, Joseph saw how God used it for his own benefit, not to mention the benefit of his family and a whole nation.
  • Thus, later in life Joseph said to the brothers who had once tried to kill him, “You intended to harm me, but God intended it for good to accomplish what is now being done, the saving of many lives” (Gen 50:20).

There are times when we simply don’t know how to pray, when we’re not sure if the things happening to us are of God or are manifestations of evil. In times like these, we may not know exactly how to thank God for everything. But even then we can still thank the Lord for his presence with us, for his compassion, for never leaving or forsaking us, for saving us from sin and death, and for giving us the sure hope of his future.

  1. We can thank God that nothing happens outside of the scope of his sovereignty and that he can and will use all things for his purposes.
  2. We can thank him that the most horrible action in all of history— the torture and murder of God’s own Son— turned out, in the mystery of his grace, to be the ultimate demonstration of divine love.

In brief, here’s how I would answer the questions with which I began.1) How can we give thanks “always”? That seems impossible. It’s unlikely that Paul meant “always” in a most literal way, as if we are supposed to be saying literal prayers of gratitude at all times, even when we’re sleeping.

So, though we mustn’t over-interpret “always,” this verse does challenge us to thank God more often throughout the day, pausing occasionally to express gratitude for one of God’s good gifts. Moreover, we can develop an inner perspective of gratitude. By thanking God intentionally and consistently, our hearts will be formed so that thankfulness becomes part of our spiritual DNA.2) Should we really thank God for “everything”? Really? Again, we mustn’t force Paul’s hyperbole into rigid, literalistic categories.

We should not thank God specifically for things that are evil. But we can thank God even in the midst of evil and suffering. The main point of this verse is to encourage us to thank God for so much more than most of us do. Let me encourage you to set aside an hour, get some paper and a writing instrument (so you won’t be distracted by your computer or phone), and write down all of the things you are thankful for.

You’ll be amazed by what you come up with, wonderful things for which you have never thanked the Lord before.3) Does this verse teach that we should always end our prayers by saying “in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ”? It’s a fine practice to conclude your prayers with some version of “in Jesus’s name.” But that’s not what is meant by this verse.

Rather, to pray “in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ” is to pray in his authority and for his purposes. If saying “in Jesus’s name” at the end of your prayers helps you to do this, then, by all means, do it. But what’s most important is that you pray covered by the authority of Jesus and seeking his will most of all. Dr. Mark D. Roberts is the executive director of Fuller’s De Pree Center and the primary writer of the daily devotions. His most recent book is a commentary on the New Testament letter to the (Zondervan, 2016). Mark and his wife Linda, an executive coach and spiritual director, have two adult children and one lively Golden Retriever. : Some Questions About Prayer from Ephesians 5:20

Asked By: Hayden Hernandez Date: created: Mar 21 2023

What is Ephesians 3 20

Answered By: Adam Walker Date: created: Mar 23 2023

Ephesians 3

  • 1 For this cause I Paul, the prisoner of Jesus Christ for you Gentiles,
  • 2 If ye have heard of the of the grace of God which is given me to you-ward:
  • 3 How that by revelation he made unto me the mystery; (as I afore in few words,
  • 4 Whereby, when ye read, ye may understand my knowledge in the of Christ)
  • 5 Which in other ages was not made known unto the sons of men, as it is now unto his holy apostles and by the Spirit;
  • 6 That the should be fellowheirs, and of the same body, and partakers of his promise in Christ by the gospel:
  • 7 Whereof I was made a minister, according to the gift of the grace of God given unto me by the effectual working of his power.
  • 8 Unto me, who am less than the least of all saints, is this given, that I should preach among the Gentiles the unsearchable of Christ;
  • 9 And to make all men see what is the fellowship of the, which from the beginning of the world hath been hid in God, who all things by :
  • 10 To the intent that now unto the principalities and powers in heavenly places might be known by the church the manifold wisdom of God,
  • 11 According to the eternal which he purposed in Christ Jesus our Lord:
  • 12 In whom we have boldness and access with confidence by the faith of him.
  • 13 Wherefore I desire that ye faint not at my tribulations for you, which is your glory.
  • 14 For this cause I bow my knees unto the of our Lord Jesus Christ,
  • 15 Of whom the whole in heaven and earth is named,
  • 16 That he would grant you, according to the of his glory, to be with might by his Spirit in the inner man;
  • 17 That Christ may dwell in your hearts by faith; that ye, being and in love,
  • 18 May be able to comprehend with all saints what is the breadth, and length, and depth, and height;
  • 19 And to know the of Christ, which passeth knowledge, that ye might be filled with all the fulness of God.
  • 20 Now unto him that is able to do exceeding abundantly above all that we ask or think, according to the power that worketh in us,

21 Unto him be glory in the church by Christ Jesus throughout all ages, without end. Amen.

Asked By: Wyatt Torres Date: created: Sep 16 2023

What is Romans 8 1

Answered By: Alfred Jackson Date: created: Sep 19 2023

ESV There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. NIV Therefore, there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus, NASB Therefore there is now no condemnation at all for those who are in Christ Jesus.

What is Matthew 19 26?

1 And it came to pass, that when Jesus had finished these sayings, he departed from Galilee, and came into the coasts of Judæa beyond Jordan; 2 And great multitudes followed him; and he healed them there.3 ¶ The Pharisees also came unto him, tempting him, and saying unto him, Is it lawful for a man to a put away his wife for every cause? 4 And he answered and said unto them, Have ye not read, that he which a made them at the beginning made them male and female, 5 And said, For this cause shall a man leave father and mother, and shall a cleave to his wife: and they twain shall be one flesh? 6 Wherefore they are no more twain, but one flesh.

What therefore God hath a joined together, let not man b put asunder,7 They say unto him, Why did Moses then command to give a a writing of b divorcement, and to put her away? 8 He saith unto them, Moses because of the a hardness of your hearts suffered you to put away your b wives : but from the beginning it was not so.9 And I say unto you, Whosoever shall put away his wife, except it be for a fornication, and shall marry another, committeth b adultery : and whoso marrieth her which is put away doth commit adultery.10 ¶ His disciples say unto him, If the case of the man be so with his wife, it is not good to marry.11 But he said unto them, All men cannot receive this saying, save they to whom it is given.12 For there are some eunuchs, which were so born from their mother’s womb: and there are some eunuchs, which were made eunuchs of men: and there be eunuchs, which have made themselves eunuchs for the kingdom of heaven’s sake.

He that is able to receive it, let him receive it.13 ¶ Then were there brought unto him little children, that he should put his a hands on them, and pray: and the disciples rebuked b them,14 But Jesus said, a Suffer little b children, and forbid them not, to come unto me: for of such is the kingdom of heaven.15 And he laid his hands on them, and departed thence.16 ¶ And, behold, one came and said unto him, Good Master, what good thing shall I do, that I may have a eternal life ? 17 And he said unto him, Why callest thou me good? there is none a good but one, that is, God: but if thou wilt enter into b life, keep the c commandments,18 He saith unto him, Which? Jesus said, Thou shalt do no a murder, Thou shalt not commit b adultery, Thou shalt not c steal, Thou shalt not bear d false witness, 19 a Honour thy father and thy mother: and, Thou shalt b love thy c neighbour as thyself.20 The young man saith unto him, All these things have I kept from my youth up: what lack I yet? 21 Jesus said unto him, If thou wilt be a perfect, go and sell that thou hast, and b give to the c poor, and thou shalt have d treasure in heaven: and come and e follow me.22 But when the young man heard that saying, he went away sorrowful: for he had a great possessions.23 ¶ Then said Jesus unto his disciples, Verily I say unto you, That a a rich man shall b hardly enter into the kingdom of heaven.24 And again I say unto you, It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God.25 When his disciples heard it, they were exceedingly amazed, saying, Who then can be saved? 26 a But Jesus beheld them, and said unto them, With men this is impossible; but with God all things are b possible,27 ¶ Then answered Peter and said unto him, Behold, we have forsaken all, and followed thee; what shall we have therefore? 28 And Jesus said unto them, Verily I say unto you, That ye which have followed me, in the a regeneration when the Son of man shall sit in the throne of his glory, ye also shall sit upon twelve thrones, b judging the twelve tribes of Israel.29 And every one that hath a forsaken houses, or brethren, or sisters, or father, or mother, or wife, or children, or lands, for my b name’s sake, shall receive an hundredfold, and shall inherit c everlasting life,30 But many that are a first shall be last; and the last shall be first.

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What does Romans 8 31 mean by if God is for us who can be against us?

‘If God is For Us, Who Can Be Against Us’ Meaning – This Bible verse is meant as encouragement to not fear the forces and things of this world that are against God and His people. “The Lord is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? The Lord is the stronghold of my life; of whom shall I be afraid?” ( Psalm 27:1 ) Got Questions gives an explanation of this phrase, saying: God is “for” us in the sense that He is on our side; He is working on our behalf and for our good.

  1. He has proved His benevolence in that He has adopted us ( Romans 8:15 ), He has given us His Spirit ( Romans 8:16-17, 8:26-27 ), and He has determined to save us ( 8:29-30 ).
  2. The follow-up question, “who can be against us?” is rhetorical.
  3. It’s another way of saying, “There is no one who could possibly be more powerful than God” or “No one can destroy us.” The idea is not that we will never face opposition; it’s simply that our opposition is doomed to failure.

They may be against us, but not successfully against us. Since God is on our side, we have nothing to worry about. Romans 8:31 is a harkening of other similar Bible passages: “The LORD is with me; I will not be afraid. What can mere mortals do to me?” ~ Psalm 118:6 “‘Don’t be afraid,’ the prophet answered.

What does it mean to love God with all your heart might mind and strength?

Loving God With All Your Heart, Soul, Mind, And Strength “And you must love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, all your mind, and all your strength.’ The second is equally important: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ No other commandment is greater than these.” – Mark 12:30-31 Nobody wants to live passive, inactive lives.

We want the opposite. We want a captivating life that brings a sense of fulfillment. When Jesus lays out the most important commandment for mankind, He starts with loving the Lord with all of your heart, soul, mind, and strength. Since we are told to love the Lord with all our hearts, soul, mind, and strength, that is exactly what we should do.

But how do we go about doing it? Loving God with your heart means to love Him with your life. Love God with your heart by living a loving, faith-filled, and purpose-driven life. This requires letting God lead the way. It means living each day in close connection with Him so we can recognize our calling.

  1. Once we do this, once we let Him lead, lives will be changed.
  2. We will experience joy.
  3. And sharing that joy with others and loving God with our whole heart will become our primary mission.
  4. It’s hard to love someone you know nothing about, so it’s important to make an effort to get to know God.
  5. By spending time in prayer, reading Scripture, we learn about who He is, what He cares about, and why He is so deserving of our love.

God sent His only Son to die for us. He forgives us. He knows all of our faults and still loves us with an everlasting and relentless love. This dimension of love is especially important for the times when we are feeling unenthused, discouraged, or even when things seem hopeless.

  1. Loving God with your soul means to love Him for eternity.
  2. When our hearts stop beating, our souls keep living.
  3. And God wants our relationship with Him to last forever.
  4. Loving God with your mind means to love Him unconditionally–because we know that He is worthy of love–even when we don’t feel like it.
  5. Even when we feel like life is unfair or when we think He’s abandoned us: even though He never leaves our side.

Loving God with all my strength means stepping out in faith. It means stepping out of my comfort zone. It means stepping out to help someone. Faith without works isn’t worth much. But faith with works can change a piece of the world for the better. Like the other concepts, loving God with all my strength is simple to say but not always easy to do.

  1. We need to remember that we don’t work any of this out by ourselves.
  2. We have a strength working within us that enables us to keep on going forward.
  3. In reality, loving the Lord your God with all your heart, soul, mind, and strength is simply a response.
  4. For we love because He first loved us.
  5. As followers of Christ, we are called to fearlessly love God with all our hearts, all our souls, minds, and strength.

Fueled with that complete and perfect love, we are empowered to take that love and share it with the world. And our broken, lost world desperately needs His love. Discussion Questions:

What can we do this week to love God with our heart, soul, mind, and strength?

: Loving God With All Your Heart, Soul, Mind, And Strength

What does it mean God will keep you in perfect peace?

Perfect Peace — Refuge “You keep him in perfect peace whose mind is stayed on you, because he trusts in you.” Isaiah 26:3 ESV Perfect peace is promised to those who stay focused on the Lord and place their trust in Him. Staying focused is an ongoing challenge for all of us.

  • Where we direct our thoughts and focus our mind determines whether we have peace or not.
  • Peace or lack of peace is determined by our thought life.
  • The Lord will accommodate us with perfect peace when we make Him our focus and fix our mind on Him.
  • Broken focus is a challenge we encounter when our attention is drawn elsewhere; usually by situations and circumstances that distract us.

It takes discipline to stay focused. God’s Word Translation states, “With perfect peace you will protect those whose minds cannot be changed, because they trust you.” Isaiah 26:3. If we are trusting God our minds cannot be changed. The Hebrew word for perfect in Isaiah 26:3 is Shalom; interesting enough the Hebrew word for peace is also Shalom.

  • This verse literally reads, “You keep him in “PEACE, PEACE” whose mind is stayed on you.” The definition for “Shalom” is to be well, happy, friendly, healthy and prosperous.
  • It means to be whole or complete.
  • Perfect peace is complete peace and is guaranteed when we focus on Jesus.
  • Since we are surrounded by so many examples of faith, we must get rid of everything that slows us down, especially sin that distracts us.

We must run the race that lies ahead of us and never give up.2 We must focus on Jesus, the source and goal of our faith.” Hebrews 12:1-2 GOD’S WORD Translation. TODAY’S PRAYER Thank you Heavenly Father for perfect peace in our lives when we stay focused on Jesus.

Asked By: Oscar Ross Date: created: Aug 24 2022

What is the message of Romans 8 31 35

Answered By: Eric Cook Date: created: Aug 26 2022

Because of Jesus’s sacrifice and our faith as believers in that sacrifice, absolutely nothing can separate us from the love of God. The Heavenly Father who loved us enough to have His Son die for us, obviously wants us to have ultimate and lasting fulfillment, He wants to give us “all things.” The world cannot rightly judge how we should live; only God can, He who loves us.

  • In Rome, there were Jewish “authorities” who accused Paul of suggesting that, because God’s grace is increased when we sin, then we should go ahead and sin more (Romans 3:8).
  • In this passage, Paul restates that because of grace, there is no condemnation before God, regardless of what the competing Jewish “authorities” might say.

If God is for us, who is against us? The world can’t bring charges against us. We are in perfect standing with God, as far as eternity is concerned, because of Christ, and we can experience God’s love and approval if we walk according to the Spirit of life.

Nothing can condemn us of wrongdoing if we walk in the newness of life. No circumstance or enemy can separate us from God’s love. God is sovereign over all. How unappealing the world and sin should be when we remember this. This ties in with Paul’s insistence that although we are given a free choice to walk in sin even though we have been freed from condemnation, when we choose to walk in sin we place ourselves back under that earthly condemnation from sin on the earth.

Where we experience the consequences of sin, we experience a disconnection from God, but not in the eternal sense, only experientially. To follow these competing Jewish “authorities” will be to become controlled by their threat of rejection and condemnation unless their rules are followed.

  1. The result will be actually living under the condemnation of the law, which Christ delivers us from.
  2. But we do not need to follow such manipulators.
  3. God, who did not spare His own Son, but delivered Him over for us all, how will He not also with Him freely give us all things? As believers, God is for us, the creator and master of everything.

So if God is for us, if He has named us His sons and daughters from faith in the sacrifice of Jesus, who can condemn us before God, who will bring a charge against God’s elect ? No one. God is the one who justifies. And certainly not these competing Jewish “authorities.” Who is the one who condemns? Just as no one can condemn us before God (because God is for us) nothing can separate Christians from the love of Jesus, He who died, yes, rather who was raised, who is at the right hand of God, who also intercedes for us.

  • This ties in with 8:29 where Paul states with emphatic certainty that every believer will be conformed to the image of Christ.
  • Paul is speaking to believers, those who have put their faith in Jesus.
  • Because of this, Paul is proclaiming that nothing, absolutely nothing, not even ourselves, can separate us from Jesus.

Who will separate us from the love of Christ? Will tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? Our choices do, however, make a very significant impact on how we experience conformation to Jesus Christ. But even if we succumb to the flesh and go back into the death, slavery, and condemnation from which we have been delivered, God will never stop pursuing our best interest.