Asked By: Justin Perez Date: created: Dec 03 2023

What is another word for person information

Answered By: Nicholas Gray Date: created: Dec 06 2023

Personal data, also known as personal information or personally identifiable information (PII), is any information related to an identifiable person.

What do you call the keeper of information?

Record-keeper Add to list Share. Definitions of record-keeper. someone responsible for keeping records. synonyms: recorder, registrar.

Asked By: Fred Torres Date: created: Feb 13 2023

What is a person or thing that carries something

Answered By: Blake Flores Date: created: Feb 16 2023

British Dictionary definitions for carrier (1 of 2) – noun

  1. a person, thing, or organization employed to carry goods, passengers, etc
  2. a mechanism by which something is carried or moved, such as a device for transmitting rotation from the faceplate of a lathe to the workpiece
  1. pathol a person or animal that, without having any symptoms of a disease, is capable of transmitting it to others
  2. Also called: charge carrier physics an electron, ion, or hole that carries the charge in a conductor or semiconductor
  3. chem
    • the inert solid on which a dyestuff is adsorbed in forming a lake
    • a substance, such as kieselguhr or asbestos, used to support a catalyst
    • an inactive substance containing a radioisotope used in radioactive tracing
    • an inert gas used to transport the sample through a gas-chromatography column
    • a catalyst that effects the transfer of an atom or group from one molecule to another
  4. a breed of domestic fancy pigeon having a large walnut-shaped wattle over the beak; a distinct variety of pigeon from the homing or carrier pigeon: See also carrier pigeon

What are crossword makers called?

‘ Cruciverbalist.’ Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cruciverbalist. Accessed 15 Sep.2023.

What do you call a person who collects and delivers letters?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 19th-century English postman A mail carrier, also referred to as a mailman, mailwoman, postal carrier, postman, postwoman, postperson, letter carrier (in American English ), or colloquially postie (in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom ), is an employee of a post office or postal service who delivers mail and parcel post to residences and businesses.

What do you call a person who makes maps besides a mapmaker?

Duties – Cartographers typically do the following:

Collect geographic data Create visual representations of data, such as annual precipitation patterns Examine and compile data from ground surveys, reports, aerial photographs, and satellite images Prepare maps in digital or graphic form for environmental and educational purposes Update and revise existing maps and charts

Photogrammetrists typically do the following:

Plan aerial and satellite surveys to ensure complete coverage of the area in question Collect and analyze spatial data, such as elevation and distance Develop base maps that allow Geographic Information System (GIS) data to be layered on top

Cartographers are mapmakers who design user-friendly maps. Photogrammetrists are specialized mapmakers who use various technologies to build models of the Earth’s surface and its features for the purpose of creating maps. Cartographers and photogrammetrists use information from geodetic surveys (land surveys that account for the curvature of the Earth’s surface) and remote-sensing systems, including aerial cameras and satellites.

Some also use light-imaging detection and ranging (LIDAR) technology. LIDAR systems use lasers attached to planes or cars to digitally map the topography of the Earth. Because LIDAR is often more accurate than traditional surveying methods, it can also be used to collect other forms of data, such as the location and density of forests.

Cartographers and photogrammetrists often develop online and mobile maps. Interactive maps are popular, and cartographers and photogrammetrists collect data and design these maps for mobile phones and navigation systems. Cartographers and photogrammetrists also create maps and perform aerial surveys for governments, to aid in urban and regional planning.

  1. Such maps may include information on population density and demographic characteristics.
  2. Some cartographers and photogrammetrists help build maps for government agencies for work involving national security and public safety.
  3. Accurate maps help emergency responders provide assistance as quickly as possible.

Cartographers and photogrammetrists who use GIS technology to create maps are often known as geographic information specialists. GIS technology is typically used to assemble, integrate, analyze, and present spatial information in a digital format. Maps created with GIS technology combine spatial graphic features with data.

What do you call a person who loves doing crossword puzzles?

“Sixty-four million people do it at least once a week. Nabokov wrote about it. Bill Clinton even did it in the White House” (Marc Romano, 2005). I’m sure many of you reading this opening quote will think that it refers to sexual infidelity but it doesn’t. I was also deliberately obtuse in the title of today’s blog to throw you off the scent of what today’s blog is about. Well, to put some of you out of your misery, the topic under the microscope today is crossword puzzles.

  • For those who don’t know, a cruciverbalist is an enthusiast of word games (especially of crosswords).
  • According to Michael Quinion in his excellent World Wide Words website: ” seems to have appeared in English about 1980 (the first reference I can find is to the Compleat Cruciverbalist of 1981 by Stan Kurzban and Mel Rosen, subtitled ‘how to solve, compose and sell crossword puzzles for fun and profit’).

However, Stan Kurzban tells me that Mel Rosen had encountered the word some years earlier in the title of a directory of crossword puzzle notables that was not widely circulated. Whatever its origin, cruciverbalist has spread into the wider language as a result of their efforts to the extent that it now appears in some larger recent US dictionaries.

The word is a modern mock-Latin invention, being a translation back into Latin of the English crossword (using Latin crucis, cross, as in words like cruciform, plus verbum, word, as in verbose or verbatim).There is also cruciverbalism, for the art of crossword compilation or crossword fandom generally, but that is much rarer”.

The opening quote comes from Marc Romano’s 2005 book The Crossword Obsession: The History and Lore of the World’s Most Popular Pastime who asserted that: “the crossword puzzle has arguably been our national obsession since its birth almost a century ago”.

  1. Seeing the word ‘obsessive’ was enough to make me think it was a topic worthy of consideration of writing a blog about it (especially when reading the accompanying blurb for Romano’s book): “Saying this is a book about puzzles is to tell only half the story.
  2. It is also an explanation into what crosswords tell us about ourselves – about the world we live in, the cultures that nurture us, and the different ways we think and learn.

If you’re a puzzler, Crossworld will enthrall you. If you have no idea why your spouse send so much time filling letters into little white squares, Crossworld will tell you – and with luck, save your marriage “. On a personal note, I ought to declare a vested self-interest in that I been doing cryptic crosswords since I was taught to do them by my father in my mid-teens.

  • In the early 1990s until the late 1990s I did (or rather attempted) The Guardian newspaper’s cryptic crossword almost every day (the birth of my daughter put a stop to daily crosswords and what little spare time I had outside of my job).
  • On the way to a conference in Bristol in 1998, I had a race on the train with one of the departmental colleagues as to who could complete that day’s Guardian crossword first.

I even got a letter in The Guardian (November 26, 2002) about a crossword puzzle set by my favourite crossword setter (John Galbraith Graham, better known under his crossword compiling pseudonym ‘Araucaria’). Many of the clues in the prize crossword I had just completed related to an anagram of the word ‘presbyterians’. The fact that ‘presbyterians’ is an anagram of ‘Britney Spears’ I found amazing. Doing crosswords appears to be a very popular hobby. According to Dean Olsher in his 2009 book, From Square One: A Meditation, with Digressions, on Crosswords, about 50 million American people do crosswords.

Olsher says that for some, crosswords are a pastime and for others it is a form of escapism (suggesting that crosswords may produce psychological feelings and motivations associated with addictive behaviours). Olsher noted that some people like the film director Alfred Hitchcock “didn’t get” crosswords.

Hitchcock told film actor, director and screenwriter Francois Truffaut that: “I don’t really approve of whodunits because they’re rather like a jigsaw or crossword puzzle. No emotion, You simply wait to found out who committed the murder” Olsher claims Hitchcock fell prey to a common false dichotomy that thinking and feeling are an either/or proposition.

Olsher claims they are inextricable, and that cerebral and emotional satisfaction are not at odds with each other. For Olsher, crosswords can be an exhilarating experience and akin to seated meditation. However, he also notes that doing crosswords (based on his own personal experience) could be an addiction : “It is more honest, though, to think of crosswords as a habit, like smoking,

It’s just something to do, every day, because it’s there. When finished with a puzzle, I don’t pump my fists in triumph or congratulate myself for my perseverance. I solve crosswords because they bring on a feeling of emptiness, and paradoxically, that feeling seems to fill a hole deep inside.

  • It’s not a release, it’s not a flushing out, although both those terms grasp at some aspect of it.
  • Norman Mailer said that for him, solving the crossword every day was like combing his brain.
  • This simile is strong because it has nothing to do with usual mental fitness.
  • It’s not about intelligence or holding onto memory,

Crosswords bring about a focused state of mind, the elusive ‘flow state’. Then there are days when I decide that this is all an elaborate self-deception, That the puzzle is indeed an escape mechanism. The crossword addiction is not a metaphor but a destructive literal truth” I was surprised to find there has been quite a lot of academic research on the benefits of doing crosswords (although very little on whether doing crosswords can be obsessive and/or addictive). However, the psychologist Dr. Howard Rachlin does mention in a number of his writings on addiction that there are many activities that could be described as ‘positive addictions’ including “listening to classical music, collecting stamps, exercise, reading novels, doing crossword puzzles”.

Dr. Rachlin also noted in a paper published in a 2002 issue of the journal Behavioral and Brain Sciences (BBS): Addiction Essential Reads “Patterns of behavior may be maintained without extrinsic rewards. For example, on a relatively small scale, activities such as solving jigsaw or crossword puzzles are valuable in themselves.

People, like me, who like to do crossword puzzles, find value in the whole act of doing the puzzle. When I sit down on a Sunday morning to do the puzzle I am not beginning a laborious act that will be rewarded only when it is completed. Yet, despite the lack of extrinsic and intrinsic reward for putting in that last particular letter, completing the puzzle is, for me, a necessary part of its value.

  1. Like listening to symphonies, the pattern is valuable only as a whole.
  2. Extrinsic rewards may initially put together the elements of these patterns but the patterns, once formed, are maintained by their intrinsic value.
  3. The cost of breaking the pattern is the loss of this value – even that of the parts already performed”.
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However, Rachlin is not without his critics. In responses to the BBS paper, Dr. Stephen Kaplan and Dr. Raymond De Young claimed that Rachlin’s interpretation of intrinsic motivation as arising from a string of habits was far from convincing. More specifically, they noted that the “fascination with crossword and jigsaw puzzles seems far more likely to be an expression of the human inclination to solve problems, a tendency humans share with nonhuman primates”.

  1. Another response to the BBS paper by Dr. Thomas R.
  2. Zentall claimed that the concept of intrinsic reinforcement is needed to explain the variety of behaviour that has no extrinsic material or social reward, such as crossword puzzle solving.
  3. He argues that: “Intrinsic reinforcers are difficult to assess.

They are what left once you have ruled out extrinsic reinforcers, and in the case of humans, typically we assess them by means of verbal behavior (e.g., ‘I just like doing it’). But this sort of definition can easily become circular, especially when we are talking about behavioral patterns that are themselves not clearly defined.

One can hypothesize that extrinsic reinforcers become internalized, but that does not explain, it only describes”. Doing crosswords may even be of psychological and practical benefit. For instance, Dr. Mike Murphy and Dr. Roisin Cunningham published a paper last year in the Irish Journal of Psychology claiming that: “a crossword a day improves verbal fluency”.

More specifically they examined ‘semantic verbal fluency’ (SVF) an important contributor to general communication ability. In their study, 34 final year students completed a daily crossword for one month and compared this to a control group of 40 students who did not do any crosswords.

Their results indicated that the crossword group experienced greater improvement in SVF than the control group. They concluded that doing simple crosswords may be a relatively straightforward way improving SVF among students who are about to enter the job market and need good transferable skills. Dr. Graham Pluck and Dr.

Helen Johnson writing in a 2011 issue of Education Science and Psychology claim that stimulating curiosity (with activities such as crosswords) can enhance learning. They drew on the work of Dr. Ludwig Lowenstein who noted that many features of human behaviour appear counter-productive on the surface but are not. Another study led by Dr. Joshua Jackson and published in a 2012 issue of the journal Psychology and Aging claimed doing crosswords could change some aspects of personality among old-aged people. More specifically, they examined whether an intervention aimed to increase cognitive ability in older adults (i.e., doing crossword and Sudoko puzzles) affected the personality trait of openness to experience (i.e., being imaginative and intellectually oriented).

In their study, old-aged adults completed a 4-month program in inductive reasoning training that included weekly crossword and Sudoku puzzles. They were then assessed continually over the following 30 weeks. Their findings showed that those who did crossword and Sudoko puzzles increased their openness scores compared to the control group.

The authors claimed that this study is one of the very first to demonstrate that personality traits can change through non-psychopharmocological interventions. Although there are a number of people online who have confessed as to being ‘crossword addicts’, I have yet to find any empirical evidence that it is negatively detrimental in people’s lives.

  1. For most, even those who describe themselves as ‘crossword obsessives’, it is a behaviour that adds to and enhances their lives.
  2. References and further reading Amende, C. (2001).
  3. The Crossword Obsession: The History and Lore of the World’s Most Popular Pastime.
  4. New York: Berkeley.
  5. Davis, T.M., Shepherd, B.

& Zwiefelhofer, T. (2009). Reviewing for exams: Do crossword puzzles help in the success of student learning? Journal of Effective Teaching, 9, 4-10. Jackson, J.J., Hill, P.L., Payne, B.R., Roberts, B.W., & Stine-Morrow, E.A.L. (2012). Can an old dog learn (and want to experience) new tricks? Cognitive training increases openness to experience in older adults.

Psychology and Aging, 27, 286-292. Kaplan, S. & De Young, R. (2002). Toward a better understanding of prosocial behavior: The role of evolution and directed attention, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 25, 263-264. Murphy, M. & Cunningham, R.K. (2102). A crossword a day improves verbal fluency: A report of an intervention study.

Irish Journal of Psychology, 133, 193-198. Olsher, D. (2009). From Square One: A Meditation, with Digressions, on Crosswords. New York: Simon & Schuster. Pluck, G. & Johnson, H. (2011). Stimulating curiosity to enhance learning, Education Science and Psychology, 2(19), 24-31.

Rachlin, H. (2002). Altruism and selfishness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 25, 239-250. Rachlin, H. (2003). Economic concepts in the behavioural study of addiction. In R.E. Vuchinich & N. Heather (Eds.), Choice, Behavioural Economics and Addiction, (pp.129-149). Oxford, UK: Pergamon Press. Romano, M. (2005). Crossworld: One Man’s Journey into America’s Crossword Obsession.

Blackpool: Broadway. Underwood, G., Deihim, C. & Batt, V. (1994). Expert performance in solving word puzzles: From retrieval cues to crossword clues. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 8, 531-548. Zentall, T.R. (2002). A potentially testable mechanism to account for altruistic behavior.

Asked By: Lawrence Powell Date: created: May 08 2024

What is someone who acts as assistant

Answered By: Aaron Simmons Date: created: May 11 2024

Noun. ˈād. Synonyms of aide. : a person who acts as an assistant.

What do you call a person who studies and collects coins crossword?

A specialist in numismatics. a person who collects numismatic items, especially coins.

Asked By: Oswald Wilson Date: created: Dec 10 2023

What do you call a 8 person group crossword

Answered By: Tyler Bailey Date: created: Dec 11 2023

Matching Answer. OCTET.

What is another word for providing of information?

Some common synonyms of inform are acquaint, apprise, and notify. While all these words mean ‘to make one aware of something,’ inform implies the imparting of knowledge especially of facts or occurrences.

What is another name for an information officer?

Chief Information Officers ALERT This website will soon be archived with the creation of Jobs and Skills Australia (JSA) and is no longer being updated. Visit the JSA webpage at Chief Information Officers plan, organise, direct, control and coordinate the ICT strategies, plans and operations of organisations to ensure the ICT infrastructure supports the organisation’s overall operations and priorities. Also known as: Chief Technology Officer.

Analyses information needs and specifies technology to meet those needs. Formulates and directs information and communication technology (ICT)strategies, policies and plans. Directs the selection and installation of ICT resources and the provision of user training. Directs ICT operations and sets priorities between system developments, maintenance and operations. Oversees the security of ICT systems.

JSA produces to show where likely future job opportunities may be. Employment projections data are only produced for occupations at the broad four digit Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO) level. While data are not available for this occupation, projections data are available for the parent occupation,, under the outlook section.

State Chief Information Officers All Jobs Average
NSW 43.1 31.6
VIC 30.5 25.6
QLD 13.3 20.0
SA 4.0 7.0
WA 5.8 10.8
TAS 0.6 2.0
NT 0.4 1.0
ACT 2.4 1.9

ul> The median age of Chief Information Officers is 44 years. This is higher than the all jobs average of 40 years. A large share of workers are aged 35 to 44 years. Females make up 10% of the workforce. This is 38 percentage points below the all jobs average of 48%. Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile and gender share compared to the all jobs average.

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average.

Age Bracket Chief Information Officers All Jobs Average
15-19 0.1 5.0
20-24 0.7 9.3
25-34 12.2 22.9
35-44 40.1 22.0
45-54 34.8 21.6
55-59 8.3 9.0
60-64 2.9 6.0
65 and Over 1.0 4.2
Median Age 44 40

Source: Based on ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Age profile of workers in this job compared to the all jobs average. A bachelor degree in information technology or computer science and extensive experience in the ICT industry is usually needed to work as a Chief Information Officer. Visit

Source: ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job.

Type of Qualification Chief Information Officers All Jobs Average
Post Graduate/Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate 29.1 10.1
Bachelor degree 43.6 21.8
Advanced Diploma/Diploma 10.8 11.6
Certificate III/IV 3.6 21.1
Year 12 10.7 18.1
Year 11 1.3 4.8
Year 10 and below 0.8 12.5

Source: ABS Census 2016, Customised Report. Highest qualification completed by workers in this job (in any field of study). Qualifications needed by new workers might be different from the qualifications of workers already in the job. Employers look for ICT Managers who can communicate clearly to a diverse range of people, and provide leadership, direction and planning.

Keeping track of how well work is progressing so you can make changes or improvements. Listening to others, not interrupting, and asking good questions. Thinking about the pros and cons of different ways to solve a problem. Reading work related information. Writing things for co-workers or customers. Noticing a problem and figuring out the best way to solve it. Being adaptable and coordinating work with other people. Talking to others. Being able to use what you have learnt to solve problems now and again in the future. Measuring how well a system is working and how to improve it. Teaching people how to do something. Judgment and decision making Figuring out the pros and cons of different options and choosing the best one. Management of personnel resources Motivating, developing, and directing people as they work, and choosing the best people for the job. Understanding why people react the way they do. Managing your own and other peoples’ time to get work done. Figuring out the best way to teach or learn something new. Figuring out how a system should work and how changes in conditions, operations, and the environment will affect it. Talking people into changing their minds or their behaviour. Understanding needs and product requirements to create a design. Using maths to solve problems.

These are important topics, subjects or knowledge areas.

Computers and electronics Circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming. Customer and personal service Understanding customer needs, providing good quality service, and measuring customer satisfaction. Arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, or statistics. Administration and management Business principles involved in strategic planning, leadership, and coordinating people and resources. Personnel and human resources Recruiting and training people, managing pay and other entitlements (like sick leave), and negotiating pay and conditions. Engineering and technology Use engineering, science and technology to design and produce goods and services. Curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects. Word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office work. English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar. Design techniques, tools, and principles used to make detailed technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models. Transmission, broadcasting, switching, control, and operation of telecommunications systems. Media production, communication, and dissemination. Includes written, spoken, and visual media. Describing land, sea, and air, including their physical characteristics, locations, how they work together, and the location of plant, animal, and human life. Human behaviour; differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; research methods; assessing and treating disorders. Economics and accounting, the financial markets, banking and checking and reporting of financial data. How our laws and courts work. Government rules and regulations, and the political system. Showing, promoting, and selling including marketing strategy, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems. Sociology and anthropology Group behaviour and dynamics, societal trends and influences, human migrations, ethnicity, cultures and their history and origins. Public safety and security Use of equipment, rules and ideas to protect people, data, property, and institutions. Production and processing Raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and ways of making and distributing goods.

Workers use these physical and mental abilities.

Listen to and understand what people say. Communicate by speaking. Read and understand written information. Write in a way that people can understand. Use general rules to find answers or solve problems logically. Use lots of detailed information to come up with answers or make general rules. Notice when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong, even if you can’t solve the problem. Order or arrange things in a pattern or sequence (e.g., numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations). See details that are up-close (within a few feet). Come up with a number of ideas about a topic, even if the ideas aren’t very good. Come up with unusual or clever ideas, or creative ways to solve a problem. Identify and understand the speech of another person. Speak clearly so others can understand you. Come up with different ways of grouping things. Add, subtract, multiply, or divide. See a pattern (a figure, object, word, or sound) hidden in other distracting material. Choose the right maths method or formula to solve a problem. Imagine how something will look after it is moved around or changed. See details that are far away. Pay attention to something without being distracted.

These are kinds of activities workers regularly do in this job.

Using computers to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information. Planning and prioritising work Deciding on goals and putting together a detailed plan to get the work done. Keeping your knowledge up-to-date Keeping up-to-date with technology and new ideas. Monitoring people, processes and things Checking objects, actions, or events, and keeping an eye out for problems. Communicating within a team Giving information to co-workers by telephone, in writing, or in person. Collecting and organising information Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or checking information or data. Making decisions and solving problems Using information to work out the best solution and solve problems. Coordinating the work of a team Getting members of a group to work together to finish a task. Looking for changes over time Comparing objects, actions, or events. Looking for differences between them or changes over time. Researching and investigating Looking for, getting and understanding different kinds of information. Building good relationships Building good working relationships and keeping them over time. Guiding and directing staff Guiding and directing staff, including setting and monitoring performance standards. Coaching and developing others Working out the needs of others and coaching, mentoring, or helping them to improve. Making sense of information and ideas Looking at, working with, and understanding data or information. Leading and encouraging a team Encouraging and building trust, respect, and cooperation among team members. Assessing and evaluating things Working out the value, importance, or quality of things, services or people. Coming up with systems and processes Deciding on goals and figuring out what you need to do to achieve them. Checking compliance with standards Deciding whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards. Scheduling work and activities Working out the timing of events, programs, and activities, as well as the work of others. Estimating amounts, costs and resources Working out sizes, distances, amounts, time, costs, resources, or materials needed for a task.

Learn about the daily activities, and physical and social demands faced by workers. Explore the values and work styles that workers rate as most important. Interests are the style or type of work we prefer to do. All interest areas are shown below.

Starting up and carrying out projects. Leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes require risk taking and often deal with business. Following set procedures and routines. Working with numbers and details more than with ideas, usually following rules. Ideas and thinking. Searching for facts and figuring out problems in your head. Practical, hands-on work. Often with plants and animals, or materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Working with forms, designs and patterns. Often need self-expression and can be done without following rules. Working with people. Helping or providing service to others.

Work values are important to a person’s feeling of satisfaction. All six values are shown below.

Job security and good working conditions. There is usually a steady flow of interesting work, and the pay and conditions are generally good. Supportive management that stands behind employees. Workers are treated fairly by their company, they are supported by management, and have supervisors who train them well. Results oriented. Workers are able to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Advancement and the potential to lead. Workers are recognised for the work that they do, they may give directions and instructions to others, and they are looked up to in their company and their community. Work alone and make decisions. Workers are able to try out their own ideas, make decisions on their own, and work with little or no supervision. Serve and work with others. Workers usually get along well with each other, do things to help other people, and are rarely pressured to do things that go against their sense of right and wrong.

The physical and social demands that workers face most often are shown below:

Use electronic mail. Work with people in a group or team. Have freedom to decide on tasks, priorities, and goals. Talk with people face-to-face. Have contact with people by telephone, face-to-face, or any other way. Spend time sitting at work. Lead or coordinate a team Lead others to do work activities. Take responsibility for the results of other people’s work. Talk on the telephone. Freedom to make decisions Have freedom to make decision on your own. Make decisions that have a large impact on other people. Be very exact or highly accurate. Frequently make decisions that impact other people. Repeat the same tasks or activities (e.g., key entry) over and over, without stopping. Work indoors with access to heating or cooling. Work where mistakes have serious consequences. Compete with others, or be aware of competitive pressures. Making repetitive motions Spend time making repetitive motions. Work to strict deadlines. Deal with conflict or disagreements.

O*NET is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The skills and importance ratings on this page are derived from the US Department of Labor O*NET Database Version 21.2,, : Chief Information Officers

Asked By: Joshua Robinson Date: created: May 21 2023

What is a synonym for collector

Answered By: Aaron Robinson Date: created: May 24 2023

Nounsomeone that hoards objects. accumulator. collector. gatherer. hoarder.

Who were the keepers of knowledge?

Holy Learning – Monasteries, abbeys, and priories were built to house men or women (or both, in the case of double monasteries ) who sought spiritual peace. For the sake of their souls, people came to live lives of work, self-sacrifice, and strict religious observance to help fellow humans.

What do you call a person who carries or delivers something coffin?

Pallbearer Definition & Meaning – Merriam-Webster.

What is the carrying of things from one place to another crossword clue?

7 Letters: TRANSIT.

What do you call a person who loves doing crossword puzzles?

“Sixty-four million people do it at least once a week. Nabokov wrote about it. Bill Clinton even did it in the White House” (Marc Romano, 2005). I’m sure many of you reading this opening quote will think that it refers to sexual infidelity but it doesn’t. I was also deliberately obtuse in the title of today’s blog to throw you off the scent of what today’s blog is about. Well, to put some of you out of your misery, the topic under the microscope today is crossword puzzles.

  • For those who don’t know, a cruciverbalist is an enthusiast of word games (especially of crosswords).
  • According to Michael Quinion in his excellent World Wide Words website: ” seems to have appeared in English about 1980 (the first reference I can find is to the Compleat Cruciverbalist of 1981 by Stan Kurzban and Mel Rosen, subtitled ‘how to solve, compose and sell crossword puzzles for fun and profit’).

However, Stan Kurzban tells me that Mel Rosen had encountered the word some years earlier in the title of a directory of crossword puzzle notables that was not widely circulated. Whatever its origin, cruciverbalist has spread into the wider language as a result of their efforts to the extent that it now appears in some larger recent US dictionaries.

The word is a modern mock-Latin invention, being a translation back into Latin of the English crossword (using Latin crucis, cross, as in words like cruciform, plus verbum, word, as in verbose or verbatim).There is also cruciverbalism, for the art of crossword compilation or crossword fandom generally, but that is much rarer”.

The opening quote comes from Marc Romano’s 2005 book The Crossword Obsession: The History and Lore of the World’s Most Popular Pastime who asserted that: “the crossword puzzle has arguably been our national obsession since its birth almost a century ago”.

Seeing the word ‘obsessive’ was enough to make me think it was a topic worthy of consideration of writing a blog about it (especially when reading the accompanying blurb for Romano’s book): “Saying this is a book about puzzles is to tell only half the story. It is also an explanation into what crosswords tell us about ourselves – about the world we live in, the cultures that nurture us, and the different ways we think and learn.

If you’re a puzzler, Crossworld will enthrall you. If you have no idea why your spouse send so much time filling letters into little white squares, Crossworld will tell you – and with luck, save your marriage “. On a personal note, I ought to declare a vested self-interest in that I been doing cryptic crosswords since I was taught to do them by my father in my mid-teens.

In the early 1990s until the late 1990s I did (or rather attempted) The Guardian newspaper’s cryptic crossword almost every day (the birth of my daughter put a stop to daily crosswords and what little spare time I had outside of my job). On the way to a conference in Bristol in 1998, I had a race on the train with one of the departmental colleagues as to who could complete that day’s Guardian crossword first.

I even got a letter in The Guardian (November 26, 2002) about a crossword puzzle set by my favourite crossword setter (John Galbraith Graham, better known under his crossword compiling pseudonym ‘Araucaria’). Many of the clues in the prize crossword I had just completed related to an anagram of the word ‘presbyterians’. The fact that ‘presbyterians’ is an anagram of ‘Britney Spears’ I found amazing. Doing crosswords appears to be a very popular hobby. According to Dean Olsher in his 2009 book, From Square One: A Meditation, with Digressions, on Crosswords, about 50 million American people do crosswords.

Olsher says that for some, crosswords are a pastime and for others it is a form of escapism (suggesting that crosswords may produce psychological feelings and motivations associated with addictive behaviours). Olsher noted that some people like the film director Alfred Hitchcock “didn’t get” crosswords.

Hitchcock told film actor, director and screenwriter Francois Truffaut that: “I don’t really approve of whodunits because they’re rather like a jigsaw or crossword puzzle. No emotion, You simply wait to found out who committed the murder” Olsher claims Hitchcock fell prey to a common false dichotomy that thinking and feeling are an either/or proposition.

Olsher claims they are inextricable, and that cerebral and emotional satisfaction are not at odds with each other. For Olsher, crosswords can be an exhilarating experience and akin to seated meditation. However, he also notes that doing crosswords (based on his own personal experience) could be an addiction : “It is more honest, though, to think of crosswords as a habit, like smoking,

It’s just something to do, every day, because it’s there. When finished with a puzzle, I don’t pump my fists in triumph or congratulate myself for my perseverance. I solve crosswords because they bring on a feeling of emptiness, and paradoxically, that feeling seems to fill a hole deep inside.

It’s not a release, it’s not a flushing out, although both those terms grasp at some aspect of it. Norman Mailer said that for him, solving the crossword every day was like combing his brain. This simile is strong because it has nothing to do with usual mental fitness. It’s not about intelligence or holding onto memory,

Crosswords bring about a focused state of mind, the elusive ‘flow state’. Then there are days when I decide that this is all an elaborate self-deception, That the puzzle is indeed an escape mechanism. The crossword addiction is not a metaphor but a destructive literal truth” I was surprised to find there has been quite a lot of academic research on the benefits of doing crosswords (although very little on whether doing crosswords can be obsessive and/or addictive). However, the psychologist Dr. Howard Rachlin does mention in a number of his writings on addiction that there are many activities that could be described as ‘positive addictions’ including “listening to classical music, collecting stamps, exercise, reading novels, doing crossword puzzles”.

Dr. Rachlin also noted in a paper published in a 2002 issue of the journal Behavioral and Brain Sciences (BBS): Addiction Essential Reads “Patterns of behavior may be maintained without extrinsic rewards. For example, on a relatively small scale, activities such as solving jigsaw or crossword puzzles are valuable in themselves.

People, like me, who like to do crossword puzzles, find value in the whole act of doing the puzzle. When I sit down on a Sunday morning to do the puzzle I am not beginning a laborious act that will be rewarded only when it is completed. Yet, despite the lack of extrinsic and intrinsic reward for putting in that last particular letter, completing the puzzle is, for me, a necessary part of its value.

Like listening to symphonies, the pattern is valuable only as a whole. Extrinsic rewards may initially put together the elements of these patterns but the patterns, once formed, are maintained by their intrinsic value. The cost of breaking the pattern is the loss of this value – even that of the parts already performed”.

However, Rachlin is not without his critics. In responses to the BBS paper, Dr. Stephen Kaplan and Dr. Raymond De Young claimed that Rachlin’s interpretation of intrinsic motivation as arising from a string of habits was far from convincing. More specifically, they noted that the “fascination with crossword and jigsaw puzzles seems far more likely to be an expression of the human inclination to solve problems, a tendency humans share with nonhuman primates”.

  1. Another response to the BBS paper by Dr. Thomas R.
  2. Zentall claimed that the concept of intrinsic reinforcement is needed to explain the variety of behaviour that has no extrinsic material or social reward, such as crossword puzzle solving.
  3. He argues that: “Intrinsic reinforcers are difficult to assess.

They are what left once you have ruled out extrinsic reinforcers, and in the case of humans, typically we assess them by means of verbal behavior (e.g., ‘I just like doing it’). But this sort of definition can easily become circular, especially when we are talking about behavioral patterns that are themselves not clearly defined.

  1. One can hypothesize that extrinsic reinforcers become internalized, but that does not explain, it only describes”.
  2. Doing crosswords may even be of psychological and practical benefit.
  3. For instance, Dr.
  4. Mike Murphy and Dr.
  5. Roisin Cunningham published a paper last year in the Irish Journal of Psychology claiming that: “a crossword a day improves verbal fluency”.

More specifically they examined ‘semantic verbal fluency’ (SVF) an important contributor to general communication ability. In their study, 34 final year students completed a daily crossword for one month and compared this to a control group of 40 students who did not do any crosswords.

Their results indicated that the crossword group experienced greater improvement in SVF than the control group. They concluded that doing simple crosswords may be a relatively straightforward way improving SVF among students who are about to enter the job market and need good transferable skills. Dr. Graham Pluck and Dr.

Helen Johnson writing in a 2011 issue of Education Science and Psychology claim that stimulating curiosity (with activities such as crosswords) can enhance learning. They drew on the work of Dr. Ludwig Lowenstein who noted that many features of human behaviour appear counter-productive on the surface but are not. Another study led by Dr. Joshua Jackson and published in a 2012 issue of the journal Psychology and Aging claimed doing crosswords could change some aspects of personality among old-aged people. More specifically, they examined whether an intervention aimed to increase cognitive ability in older adults (i.e., doing crossword and Sudoko puzzles) affected the personality trait of openness to experience (i.e., being imaginative and intellectually oriented).

In their study, old-aged adults completed a 4-month program in inductive reasoning training that included weekly crossword and Sudoku puzzles. They were then assessed continually over the following 30 weeks. Their findings showed that those who did crossword and Sudoko puzzles increased their openness scores compared to the control group.

The authors claimed that this study is one of the very first to demonstrate that personality traits can change through non-psychopharmocological interventions. Although there are a number of people online who have confessed as to being ‘crossword addicts’, I have yet to find any empirical evidence that it is negatively detrimental in people’s lives.

For most, even those who describe themselves as ‘crossword obsessives’, it is a behaviour that adds to and enhances their lives. References and further reading Amende, C. (2001). The Crossword Obsession: The History and Lore of the World’s Most Popular Pastime. New York: Berkeley. Davis, T.M., Shepherd, B.

& Zwiefelhofer, T. (2009). Reviewing for exams: Do crossword puzzles help in the success of student learning? Journal of Effective Teaching, 9, 4-10. Jackson, J.J., Hill, P.L., Payne, B.R., Roberts, B.W., & Stine-Morrow, E.A.L. (2012). Can an old dog learn (and want to experience) new tricks? Cognitive training increases openness to experience in older adults.

  1. Psychology and Aging, 27, 286-292.
  2. Aplan, S.
  3. De Young, R. (2002).
  4. Toward a better understanding of prosocial behavior: The role of evolution and directed attention,
  5. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 25, 263-264.
  6. Murphy, M.
  7. Cunningham, R.K. (2102).
  8. A crossword a day improves verbal fluency: A report of an intervention study.

Irish Journal of Psychology, 133, 193-198. Olsher, D. (2009). From Square One: A Meditation, with Digressions, on Crosswords. New York: Simon & Schuster. Pluck, G. & Johnson, H. (2011). Stimulating curiosity to enhance learning, Education Science and Psychology, 2(19), 24-31.

  • Rachlin, H. (2002).
  • Altruism and selfishness.
  • Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 25, 239-250.
  • Rachlin, H. (2003).
  • Economic concepts in the behavioural study of addiction. In R.E.
  • Vuchinich & N.
  • Heather (Eds.), Choice, Behavioural Economics and Addiction,
  • Pp.129-149).
  • Oxford, UK: Pergamon Press.
  • Romano, M. (2005).
  • Crossworld: One Man’s Journey into America’s Crossword Obsession.

Blackpool: Broadway. Underwood, G., Deihim, C. & Batt, V. (1994). Expert performance in solving word puzzles: From retrieval cues to crossword clues. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 8, 531-548. Zentall, T.R. (2002). A potentially testable mechanism to account for altruistic behavior.

Asked By: Gilbert Brown Date: created: Sep 01 2023

What do you call the person who carries the coffin or bad news

Answered By: Cameron Howard Date: created: Sep 04 2023

Who Can Be A Pallbearer – Pallbearers can be men or women, and are often either family members or close friends of the deceased. Traditionally, there are six pallbearers at a funeral, as there are usually six handles on a casket (three on each side), though there are often two handles on the front and back sides of a casket, allowing for eight pallbearers.