Asked By: Richard Phillips Date: created: May 30 2023

What about the boots in The Little Things

Answered By: Harry Alexander Date: created: Jun 02 2023

This article contains spoilers for Denzel Washington’s The Little Things, Read our spoiler-free review here, The opening of John Lee Hancock’s The Little Things is pure adrenaline. A young woman minding her own business and rightfully bopping to the B-52’s “Roam”—and also making a nice homage to Buffalo Bill’s final victim in The Silence of the Lambs —is targeted by a mysterious driver who tries to run her off the road.

  • Once cornered at a nearby gas station, the would-be victim is only able to escape by the skin of her teeth.
  • It’s all terrifying, partially because it likely has real world influences, and partially because the only thing she sees of her stalker is “cowboy boots.” The audience gets a better look at them than she does (as well as the duct tape he also collected from his trunk), but it’s not much to go on for investigators talking to the survivor of Los Angeles County’s new serial killer.

Yet it was enough to cause many viewers to get hung up on those boots and the fact that Denzel Washington ‘s John “Deke” Deacon wears boots of his own at the end of the film. While covering up a murder. And planting evidence on a dead suspect. The movie was on HBO Max less than a day before the conspiracy theorizing began about Deke’s actual motives.

  1. So then, is the online speculation correct? Could Deke be a serial killer who for years has been hiding his crimes from his fellow cops in plain sight? Not likely.
  2. Accusations of Deke being the serial killer suggest a few interesting things about how we consume media, and how folks like to see law enforcement depicted in 2021 but it has little to do with the film’s actual plot.

As you can glean from the image below, when the boots worn by the killer and those worn by Deke are placed side by side, it becomes obvious they’re different footwear. And neither actually belong to Washington’s character! Indeed, the pair of boots Deke wears while raiding the murdered Albert Sparma’s home—and then later leaves in his motel room—is the evidence Joe first drove down to Los Angeles to retrieve in the first place: bloody shoes that would supposedly incriminate a suspect.

  • However, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department forced Deke to wait 24 hours to acquire the evidence, and by then their owner had made a deal confessing to his crimes back upstate.
  • So Deke was left with a pair of shoes to dress up in but with no place to go.
  • Hence Jimmy Baxter ( Rami Malek ) wisecracking “nice boots’ after seeing Deke carry the bloody evidence bag into a diner.

Nevertheless, Deke eventually does find a use for them—by wearing them to cover up Jimmy’s mistake. When Jimmy smashed Albert Sparma’s skull in, there was no concrete evidence that connected Sparma to any of the murders in the film. Leto’s creep has the air of a ” charismatic serial killer,” but in truth he was probably just a crime buff who obsessed over the gory details.

  • As Baxter originally said, “walk in confessors” are never the actual killer.
  • So Deke wore those boots to save Jimmy from what would’ve been a clear cut case of second degree murder, getting rid of anything that suggests Sparma was still living in Los Angeles when he died, and then buying a hair barrette to mail Jimmy, absolving him of his guilt.

But Deke did this only to help a friend. After all, Joe’s been there. When he was chasing who was possibly the same serial killer some years back, Deke shot one of the victims, unaware in the dark of night she was running for her life. He’s covered up one cop’s murder before (his own), so he did the same for Jimmy.

This doesn’t mean Deke is the serial killer. In fact, that seems almost impossible given his own personal grief and guilt over the death of Mary Roberts, the woman he shot in the woods, throughout the movie. Deke really believes he can be these victims’ “angels,” yet all he and Jimmy end up in is a living hell.

Join our mailing list Get the best of Den of Geek delivered right to your inbox! Yet the tropes which inform Deke’s troubles, and some audiences’ suspicion, makes for a fascinating contrast. With a screenplay first written by Hancock in 1993, The Little Things both lightly critiques and embraces what were then only burgeoning tropes in the ascendant serial killer genre.

  • A year prior to the script’s writing, Silence of the Lambs won a slew of Oscars, including Best Picture, by thriving on the duality between a young FBI trainee named Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) and the incarcerated serial killer who became a pseudo-mentor and ally to her, Dr.
  • Hannibal Lecter (Anthony Hopkins).

Hollywood was coming to embrace the ambiguity between the hunted and hunter, with the law enforcement heroes like Clarice being just as obsessed as the predatory killers they pursue. This becomes much more pronounced in 2001’s Hannibal where there is a symbiotic relationship verging on romantic between Clarice and Hannibal (which is explicit in the book).

But by the time that belated sequel came out, there had been a decade of serial killer and investigative police procedurals in Silence of the Lambs ‘ wake, plus unproduced screenplays like The Little Things, By now you know this convention about the cop and killer: where one says “you and I are not so different” (a line Sparma speaks to Baxter in The Little Things ), and the two suffer from a near false equivalency in characterization.

This reached farcical heights in John Woo’s action-opera, Face/Off (1997). The Little Things is of course more grounded than those things, including Silence of the Lambs, which reveled in the image of Hannibal Lecter walking free in the streets in the final shot, a wolf among the sheep. By contrast the killer remains hidden throughout The Little Things, and the cops are never certain about anything. When they take heroic Hollywood action, like getting in the car with the killer and breaking all the the rules, they pay for it by having to cover-up a murder.

  1. Still, the movie sympathizes with them no differently than how Hannibal might with its image of Clarice going rogue to capture the serial killer—it just ends a lot worse for Jimmy and Deke.
  2. In the end, The Little Things very much seeks to maintain the grandeur of cops sacrificing everything—including their ability to live with themselves—for the greater good.

It’s still a romantic view of law enforcement doing what needs to be done, even if that means filling a hole in the desert with an innocent man. I imagine this might be what audiences are really responding suspiciously toward—Deke’s justifications and rationalizations for cops with blood on their hands.

  1. Denzel Washington is as charismatic and heroic here as when he played a cop chasing a serial killer in 1999’s The Bone Collector,
  2. But unlike that happy-go-lucky thriller, The Little Things has Washington cover up crimes committed by the police. Twice.
  3. That is landing with viewers differently in 2021, one year after the death of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and so many other lives wrongfully lost to police officers, or those whom authorities ultimately chose not to prosecute.

Deke’s choice to protect his brother in blue, even if Sparma potentially never killed anybody, is why folks might really be looking for an excuse to (further) condemn The Little Things ‘ troubled cop.

Is there a sequel to The Little Things?

The Little Things 2 Story Details – The Little Things ending means that it would have to be a prequel for Leto to be involved. Denzel Washington’s Deke and Rami Malek’s Jim Baxter could team up again to go after another killer, but since Baxter’s future as a detective is left uncertain, that storyline would have to include how he overcomes the trauma he undergoes in The Little Things,

Asked By: Justin Hall Date: created: Feb 26 2024

Why was the box empty in the little things

Answered By: Austin Wright Date: created: Feb 28 2024

This article contains The Little Things spoilers. You can find our spoiler-free review here, It’s the piece of the puzzle Rami Malek ‘s Jim Baxter has been waiting for. The young—and now entirely ruined—LAPD police detective can stop wondering about the night before—the night his shovel cracked the skull of Albert Sparma ( Jared Leto ).

  • At the time of the murder, there was no clear cut evidence Sparma was the serial killer that law enforcement was hunting—or that Sparma even committed a crime beyond being a full-on creep.
  • But when Joe “Deke” Deacon ( Denzel Washington ) mails the younger man a red barrette, Jimmy knows he can at least have peace of mind: He killed a killer.

Of course life and the questions which keep you up at night don’t have answers as easy as a typical Hollywood movie. And peace cannot exist for those who get into what Deke calls the “angel” business. Indeed, in the same package with the hair barrette, Deke sends a clear message: We’re not angels.

  1. But that’s because Deke has chosen to become Jimmy’s watchful guardian.
  2. Earlier in the movie, Deke mentioned that when you agree to solve a murder, which in his mind means obsess over it, you make a pact with the victim.
  3. Wherever they are out in the ether (if anywhere), you’ve become their avenger, carrying their burdens, and their ghosts, with you.

This is visualized by each of the homicide victims Deke imagines visiting his bedroom nightly, with one above all others occupying his mental space: Mary Roberts. She was the young woman who truly brought him back to Los Angeles. The old cop is convinced the serial killer who got away years ago when he was in the LAPD is the same man who’s begun piling up the bodies of tortured young women across SoCal.

  1. Women like Ronda Rathbun, who disappeared while jogging one night wearing her red barrette.
  2. As the movie unspools its multiple mysteries, we learn why Deke is so specifically haunted by Mary Roberts’ ghost.
  3. Unlike the other victims in his unsolved case from a few years back, Mary was the one who actually got away, and in a fit of panic in the darkness, Deke shot her, thinking she was the killer emerging from a tree line.

When poor Mary’s body was placed on a slab at the police department, the mortician Flo (Michael Hyatt) decided to cover for Deke, the ostensible good cop. She pulled a bullet out of the dead woman’s corpse and called the hole it left a stab wound. It’s why earlier in the film Flo warned Deke that she needs to remind herself about “what we did,” keeping a shattered bullet as a key chain.

  • Yet if she carries the guilt in her day-to-day life, listening to early ‘60s pop songs to lift the veil of her job’s gloominess—and thereby giving the movie its groovy soundtrack—Joe let it consume him.
  • He is both Mary’s murderer and angel, convinced he can still atone by finding the man who kidnapped and tortured her before that fatal night.

Yet by The Little Things ‘ end, Deke and his young protégé have more questions than answers. Once again, Joe finds himself covering up a murder, this time one committed by Jimmy, who let Sparma’s goading and general creepiness get to him. But in many ways, it is a reversal of the iconic ending to David Fincher’s Seven,

Whereas in that classic an admitted serial killer (Kevin Spacey) is able to pressure a young detective (Brad Pitt) into murdering him by revealing the full extent of his bloody work via Gwyneth Paltrow’s head, Leto’s ostensible murderer drives Malek’s hero into madness by way of ambiguity. All circumstantial evidence seems to suggest Leto’s leering dirtbag is the killer.

He literally gets an erection just imagining the recent slew of women murdered by a monster in the dark. But there’s no concrete evidence, and when Jimmy and Deke stage an illegal break-in of Sparma’s home, they find unnerving press clippings, but those could just as much be the fascinations of a crime buff as a killer’s trophies.

Sparma promises an actual body when he takes Jimmy out into the night. But all he actually offers is ridicule and mockery, teasing the cop but never providing anything tangibly hard, other than the shovel in Jimmy’s hands the gnawing ambiguity of it is the film’s real horror. At least Jimmy can rest his guilty conscience on the red barrette Deke mailed him.

To the younger man, and initially the audience, it appears to be the proverbial smoking gun they needed; Deke must’ve discovered it while ransacking Sparma’s house after the murder. But as we see in the final scene, the potential box of “trophies” Deke thought was in the house didn’t have a red hair clipping in it.

Rather Deke bought it from a store, as a giftwrapped lie for $4.99. He mails the mistruth to Jim so he’ll sleep at night, but as with Mary Roberts’ killer, the real answers about Sparma remain unknown, buried in his unmarked grave. As we see in the film’s final montage, the FBI has come to Los Angeles bringing then state of the art psychological profiling techniques to hunt their killer.

If they never find him, and there are no more murders, then perhaps Sparma really was the killer he appeared to be. But that truth remains elusive. Sparma was a perverse weirdo who confessed to a murder he didn’t commit eight years ago, and who gets his jollies by imagining agonizing death.

  1. But according to FBI profilers, phony walk-in confessors never actually meet the profile of the real killers.
  2. Join our mailing list Get the best of Den of Geek delivered right to your inbox! And keep in mind that Stan Peters, the sex criminal Jim and Joe interrogated earlier, had an odd reaction to the name Mary Roberts.

Afterward he put a shotgun in his mouth. If he was the serial killer, then that could also explain the inexplicable absence of new disappearances and bodies—meaning Sparma was an innocent man when the cops put six feet of dirt on his head. Or perhaps the living, breathing killer will just go to ground again, leaving town like the one who abducted Mary Roberts oh, so many years back.

Is Jared Leto wearing a prosthetic in the little things?

Photos from Jared Leto’s Most Extreme Transformations Mar 31, 2022 3:51 PM Leto could not resist the chance to transform into a living vampire as the titular anti-hero in his new movie that is set in Sony Pictures’ Universe of Marvel Characters. “I loved that it was the very first time this character was going to be on screen,” Leto told Variety,

  • I’ve always been interested in transformation, and this was a way to explore that territory in a big Marvel film.
  • It was impossible to say no.” While he did not drink blood or shave his teeth into fangs for the role of Dr.
  • Michael Morbius, Leto did extensive research on the rare, incurable condition his character has, speaking with doctors and patients who live with the blood disease.

He also learned how to walk with a cane, though he did not want to share the details of his preparation for that aspect of the character. “For me, it’s an opportunity to learn,” he said. “I don’t want to get too specific because I’d like to keep some of that for myself.

WeImpressed by Leto’s committed take on disgraced WeWork founder Adam Neumann in the Apple TV+ series, which debuted in March. To portray the businessman, whom he met in-person prior to filming, Leto sported prosthetics and used an Israeli accent, which he admitted was challenging to nail. Leto hired a team of five Israelies to rehearse lines with and attended Shabbat dinners so he could “hear that voice all the time,” he explained To, adding that his accents for WeWorked and House of Gucci began blurring together at one point.

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“A couple of times, strangely towards the end of shooting WeCrashed, Paolo’s started to come out a little bit,” Leto said. “It was very bizarre. I don’t know if it’s because I got tired or if Paolo was just demanding my attention, but that can happen.” For Leto’s facial transformation, Oscar-winning special effects makeup artist Kazu Hiro used precise prosthetics to achieve a realistic look, with the actor telling Entertainment Tonight, “There were some things happening there.

  1. It’s very hard to do subtle work.
  2. In this one, we have some subtle things going on.” Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures Inc.
  3. Leto spent six hours in hair and makeup to portray the overweight and balding Paolo Gucci in House of Gucci, with Oscar-nominated designer Göran Lundström using a 3D scanner to make the prosthetics he wore.

With Leto preferring to remain in character as the outlandish fashion designer as much as possible, Lundström told Variety, “We usually apply makeup on set, but Jared wanted us to apply this at a separate location. So, he would show up on set as Paolo Gucci.” And the actor’s physical transformation was so realistic that his co-star Al Pacino didn’t recognize him the first time they met.

“I showed up for the first day of work in character and I went up and said ‘papa,’ you know, papa in an accent, and he looked over and kind of just skirted away from me,” Leto recalled on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, “I said, ‘Oh, maybe he is a little grumpy, I don’t know.’ I said, ‘Papa, it’s me Paolo,’ and he basically shuffled off again like, ‘Who is this creep?'” Nicola Goode / Warner Bros.

Pictures As creepy murder suspect Albert Sparma in the 2021 psychological thriller, Leto wore a subtle nose prosthetic, fake teeth and contacts to change his eye color. Like the film’s title suggests, Leto’s look was all about the small details. “I think a lot of people don’t notice these things, but together, they all add up to the final product,” he told,

I had a different nose, which nobody brings up to me.” Leto also revealed the hair team tested “about 20 different, really horrible wigs” before ultimately deciding to keep his natural hair. Leto chopped off his signature ombre locks, bleached his hair and then dyed it green while also shaving off his eyebrows for his time as the Joker in the 2014 DC superhero flick.

Add in lots of tattoos, including the word “Damaged” on his forehead, and silver teeth and you have the most extreme (and divisive) take on the legendary character yet. But his transformation into the supervillain extended beyond his appearance, with the actor sending gag gifts like “used condoms” and “anal beads” to his co-stars, including Viola Davis and Margot Robbie,

(There were also rumors of Leto gifting a dead rat.) “I did a lot of things to create a dynamic, to create an element of surprise, of spontaneity, and to really break down any kind of walls that may be there,” he told E! News at the premiere. “The Joker is somebody who doesn’t really respect things like personal space or boundaries.” But in 2021, Leto clarified the reports of his gag gifts,, “Any of the very few gifts that were ever given were given with a spirit of fun and adventure and received with laughter, fun and adventure.” He added, “I’m playing a guy called the Joker, it’s okay to play some jokes.

Nothing ever crossed any lines, and it’s not up to other people on the internet to create those lines I’m an artist at the end of the day. If I do something risky and you don’t like it, basically, you can kiss my ass.” Anne Marie Fox/Voltage/Kobal/Shutterstock For his Oscar-winning turn as a transgender woman living with AIDS in the ’80s, Leto to appear sickly thin.

I got down to 116 or something,” Leto told E! News in 2013. “I just basically didn’t eat. I ate very little.” “I had done similar things with weight, but this was different,” Leto continued. “I think the role demanded that commitmentIt was about how does that affect how I walk, how I talked, who I am, how I feel.

You know, you feel very fragile and delicate and unsafe.” Artina/Peace Arch Group/Kobal/Shutterstock In 2007, Leto gained 67 pounds to portray Mark David Chapman, the man who assassinated John Lennon. The extra weight took such a toll on the actor that he could no longer walk to set by the end of production and was later diagnosed with gout and advised to,

  1. I’m not sure it was the wisest choice,” he admitted to The Los Angeles Times that year.
  2. A friend of mine was recently going to gain weight for a film, and I did my best to talk him out of it.
  3. Just because you can lose the weight doesn’t mean the impact it had on you isn’t there anymore.” But Leto felt it was a necessary aspect of the character.

“The script didn’t say, ‘Page 1: You gain 67 pounds, and you’re miserable for two months,'” Leto explained. “But as I started to research, I realized that the physical representation of this guy had so much to do with who he was.” : Photos from Jared Leto’s Most Extreme Transformations

Asked By: Anthony Baker Date: created: Jan 28 2024

Who ended up being the killer in The Little Things

Answered By: Louis Martin Date: created: Jan 28 2024
The ending of The Little Things is ambiguous about Sparma’s guilt, leading some viewers to The Little Things killer theory that it’s actually the corrupt police officer, Deacon. In The Little Things ending, Joe Deacon ( Denzel Washington ) and Jim Baxter ( Rami Malek ) have no answers to the murder mystery with which they are unhealthily obsessed, leading to rather sinister events.

Instead of solving his case, Baxter ends up murdering the prime suspect Albert Sparma ( Jared Leto ). Instead of turning Baxter in, Deacon is there conveniently to help him cover it up, just as Deacon’s colleagues helped him cover up an accidental murder of his own years earlier. Deacon may be the real killer in The Little Things, but for every clue that Deacon is the real killer, there’s a plausible counterargument for his innocence.

There’s not enough evidence to reveal the identity of the real killer in The Little Things,.

5/31/2023by Steve Cuffari, Stephen Barker ScreenRant.com

Asked By: Austin Williams Date: created: Nov 20 2023

What does no angels mean in The Little Things

Answered By: Samuel Gray Date: created: Nov 21 2023

Was Sparma really responsible for the murders? – During the final moments of the film, we watch Jimmy receive an envelope sent from Deacon at his home, containing a red barrette, implying that Sparma was, in fact, responsible for at least one murder.

(Or perhaps all of them?) The envelope also contained a note, “no angels,” referencing an earlier discussion they’d had in which Deacon said they couldn’t be in the “angel business” as detectives. Of course, we do find out that Deacon had bought the barrette for Jimmy, without Jimmy’s knowledge. Deacon knows that Jimmy needs the emotional resolve to forge on, even if it’s based on a lie.

It’s the kind of resolve Deacon never had and now lives his entire life affected by. He wants to protect Jimmy from his same fate. But the truth is we don’t know whether Sparma did it. We learned that Sparma confessed to a murder he didn’t commit years earlier and his psychological profile doesn’t meet that of the killer.

In other words, the evidence is flimsy at best. (Though one fact remains: he did know the 457th marker where a murder had been committed before anyone else seemed to know, save for the cops.) to join our MVP program and gain exclusive access to the best fitness and health stories out there. Trust us, you won’t look back.

Men’s Health // Studio D Still, there’s reason to believe that Jimmy isn’t off the hook just yet. If Sparma did do it, the string of murders would come to a stop. If he didn’t, then Jimmy must live with the reality that he killed an innocent man, as the murders continue. Josh Ocampo is the Senior Editor at Men’s Health. He has covered politics, travel, and food for Mic, Men’s Journal, and Bon Appetit. : The ‘Little Things’ Ending Explained – Was Albert Sparma the Killer?

Asked By: Jack Walker Date: created: Feb 15 2024

Who is the coroner in The Little Things

Answered By: Harold Carter Date: created: Feb 15 2024

THE LITTLE THINGS NOTE: This spoiler was submitted by Jeremy Los Angeles, October 1990 – A young woman named Tina Salvatore (Sofia Vassilieva) is driving by herself when a car with an unseen driver comes close to her. The driver goes past her and stops at a stop sign waiting for her.

  • Tina drives past and keeps going.
  • Fearing she is being followed, she stops at a nearby gas station to get help, but the place seems empty.
  • The driver then stops at the same place and gets some items from the trunk.
  • Tina runs and hides from the man until she sees a truck coming up on the road.
  • She stops in the middle and gets the truck driver to stop for her.

The following day, Kern County Sheriff Joe “Deke” Deacon (Denzel Washington) is responding to a complaint from a shop owner whose neon sign keeps getting damaged. Deke was a former detective who suffered a breakdown after a specific case years earlier, and he now lives alone.

He is placed with young hotshot lead detective Jimmy Baxter (Rami Malek) as they gather evidence related to a recent murder case, which may be connected to a series of other murders involving prostitutes. Deke and Jimmy join other authorities, including Jimmy’s partner Detective Jamie Estrada (Natalie Morales), to the apartment of the most recent victim, Julie Brock (Tiffany Gonzalez).

She is found stabbed and bound, and there is evidence to indicate that the killer came back to the crime scene and moved the body. Deke is met by the coroner, Flo Dunigan (Michael Hyatt), who knows Deke from way back and knows of his history. Across the street from the building, Deke finds an observation point overlooking the apartment.

  1. He notices the killer’s modus operandi is similar to the case that haunted him, wherein he discovered two victims nude and bound with bags over their heads.
  2. Later that night, a woman named Ronda Rathbun (Maya Kazan) is finishing an evening jog with a friend before they part ways.
  3. A brown car similar to the one that followed Tina starts to follow Ronda.

She is immediately reported missing the following day. Jimmy brings Deke in when they apprehend a suspect, Stan Peters (Frederick Koehler), who became a registered sex offender after he was caught urinating in public. When Jimmy shows Stan a photo of Julie, Stan breaks down in tears.

  • Jimmy then brings up the name of another victim, Mary Roberts (Anna McKitrick), and Stan stands from his seat as if he knows that Deke is on the other side of the mirror.
  • Deke then goes to Flo to learn anything on Julie.
  • It is determined that she had roast beef in her stomach that was partially digested, but she was known to follow a strict vegan diet.

Deke and Flo then go share a meal together, where Flo brings up an incident related to Deke’s infamous case, and she keeps a keychain with a fired bullet on her person. Deke later returns to Julie’s apartment to keep investigating, and he speaks to the landlady after she checks on him.

Deke later rents out a room at a seedy hotel in the area with prostitutes occupying the street outside. He continues to keep files on the victims from the old case, and he sees images of the victims coming alive, but especially Mary Roberts. Jimmy learns from Captain Carl Farris (Terry Kinney) that Deke’s obsession with his previous case caused him to have a breakdown, resulting in a heart attack, a divorce, and triple bypass surgery.

Jimmy later meets with Ronda’s parents to try and find her. They provide some help by saying that she was usually seen with a red barrette in her hair. Authorities later find another woman’s body underneath a bridge, but Jimmy confirms that it’s not Ronda’s body.

They learn that the victim was a prostitute, like most of the other victims. Deke and Jimmy step aside, where Jimmy tells Deke that Stan committed suicide the night before. After having a meal with Jimmy’s family, Deke goes to visit his ex-wife Marsha (Judith Scott). He later rejoins Jimmy at a bar as they go over the facts that they have learned in relation to their investigation of the murders.

Deke also takes Jimmy by the site of the previous case, even showing him the location where the bodies were found. In Deke’s continued investigation, he finds a suspect in Albert Sparma (Jared Leto), a worker at a repair shop that stands in close proximity to the murders. Albert is later brought in for questioning to the precinct. Tina also happens to be there to report the stalking incident from earlier. She sees Albert and appears to recognize him, but when Jimmy and Jamie show her photos of recent perps, she cannot seem to properly identify Albert as the man who stalked her.

  1. Jimmy talks to Albert, who admits to having a fascination with serial killers and crimes such as this, even appearing to get aroused at some of the crime scene photos.
  2. Deke enters the room and forcibly grabs Albert, shoving him against the wall, which cuts the interrogation short.
  3. Jimmy talks to Farris again and learns that Albert had falsely confessed to a murder eight years prior, so anything he says is unreliable.

He goes to Deke’s hotel room and is disturbed by his documents on the previous case, but still asks for his help in trying to nail Albert. They go to his apartment to do a search when he is gone but they have to flee when other cops from that jurisdiction show up.

The next night, Jimmy catches Albert on his own, and the man tells him he can lead Jimmy to where he allegedly hid Ronda’s body, while Deacon follows. Jimmy is led to the desert where Albert starts messing with him by giving him conflicting locations to the body. Eventually, Albert says he never killed anyone and is just wasting Jimmy’s time.

As Jimmy keeps digging, Albert taunts him by mentioning his wife and daughters, calling him a bad detective who can’t protect his family. Jimmy snaps and whacks Albert across the head with the shovel, killing him. He sits in shock over what he’s done as Deke comes to help him.

Another flashback reveals what went down the night of Deke’s case – after finding two victims, Deke heard a noise in the bushes and fired a shot, thinking the killer was about to emerge. It was really Mary Roberts, who had survived but was accidentally shot and killed. Farris and Flo covered it up by saying that Mary had been stabbed to death.

Deke then has Jimmy dig and fill multiple holes before burying Albert in one of them. All the while, Jimmy tries to convince himself and Deke that Albert really was their guy. Deke proceeds to gather any and all evidence from Albert’s apartment and proceeds to burn it.

  • Jimmy sits outside in the backyard while his daughters play, but they and his wife notice he is not feeling right.
  • Someone from the precinct stops by to give Jimmy an envelope.
  • It’s from Deke, with a message that reads “No Angels”, along with a red barrette, leading Jimmy to think that Deke has found the evidence they need to incriminate Albert.

In reality, Deke just bought that barrette with a pack to put Jimmy’s mind at ease, and he continues to burn Albert’s evidence to, in one way, put this case to rest.

*CUT TO THE CHASE* Brought to you by

In 1990, Los Angeles is terrorized by a serial killer targeting young women, specifically prostitutes. Sheriff Joe “Deke” Deacon is paired with young hotshot lead detective Jimmy Baxter to catch the killer. Deke is still haunted from a previous unsolved case from when he worked as a detective, which caused him to have a breakdown and be demoted.

Jimmy becomes equally obsessed with the current case when a young woman named Ronda Rathbun goes missing. The pair find a suspect in Albert Sparma, a repair shop worker who drives a car similar to the one the killer had been seen with. After bringing Albert in for questioning, he exhibits traits fitting the profile of a serial killer, but he is nothing more than a creepy guy fascinated with serial killers.

Jimmy tries to catch Albert after failing to get evidence from his apartment, and Albert says he will lead Jimmy to where he buried Ronda’s body. After wasting his time, Albert says he never killed anyone, but after he taunts Jimmy too much, Jimmy snaps and kills him with a shovel.

  • Deke arrives to help Jimmy get rid of Albert’s body, and it is revealed that the earlier case haunted Deke so much because he had accidentally shot and killed one of the surviving victims when he thought that the killer was attacking, and his colleagues helped cover it up.
  • Similarly, Deke is helping Jimmy cover up his own murder.
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Deke burns all evidence from Albert’s place and sends Jimmy a red barrette to make him think that it’s the one that belonged to Ronda (her parents described it to Jimmy as one of her belongings) to give him closure to the cases, even though they remain unsolved.

What was in the envelope in little things?

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Kern County Deputy Sheriff Joe Deacon is sent to Los Angeles for what should have been a quick evidence-gathering assignment. Instead, he becomes embroiled in the search for a serial killer who is terrorizing the city. Deke ( Denzel Washington ), a burnt-out Kern County, CA deputy sheriff teams up with Baxter ( Rami Malek ), a crack LASD detective, to nab a serial killer. Deke’s nose for the “little things” proves eerily accurate, but his willingness to circumvent the rules embroils Baxter in a soul-shattering dilemma. Meanwhile, Deke must wrestle with a dark secret from his past. — cochiseledoux Kern County Deputy Sheriff Joe “Deke” Deacon is sent to Los Angeles for what should have been a quick evidence-gathering assignment. Instead, he becomes embroiled in the search for a killer who is terrorizing the city. Leading the hunt, L.A. Sheriff Department Sergeant Jim Baxter, impressed with Deke’s cop instincts, unofficially engages his help. But as they track the killer, Baxter is unaware that the investigation is dredging up echoes of Deke’s past, uncovering disturbing secrets that could threaten more than his case. Yearning for closure, after the case that nearly broke him, the guilt-ridden Kern County deputy sheriff with the infallible instinct, Joe Deacon, once the pride of the Los Angeles Police Department, finds himself embroiled in a high-profile manhunt that has the entire city terrified. After two long months of fruitless efforts, six victims, no witnesses, no evidence, and the maniac still on the loose, Deacon’s successor, the media-savvy lead detective, Jim Baxter, knows that, now, more than ever, he needs all the help he can get. And, more and more, this frenzied serial-killer hunt bears an uncanny resemblance to a cold case from five years earlier. But, how do you find redemption when the truth lies hidden in the little things? — Nick Riganas

One night in 1990, a girl drives on a highway, stalked by a motorist. She pulls over at a gas station, where the motorist follows her. The gas station is closed and she is forced to run through the desert. She catches the attention of a passing truck driver, escaping from the pursuit. Some time later in Bakersfield, Kern County deputy sheriff Joe “Deke” Deacon is called to the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department to collect evidence pertaining to a recent murder. Deacon is a former L.A. Sheriff’s detective and, for reasons later revealed, is disliked by most of the cops in L.A. One of the few people who seems happy to see him is Flo Dunigan, the coroner. Deacon still has a reputation for being a good detective and ends up going with recently appointed lead detective Jimmy Baxter to the scene of the latest in a string of murders that has been going on in L.A. Deacon notices similarities between the M.O. of the killing and the M.O. of an old serial murder case he was unable to solve. That night, a woman, named Ronda Rathbun, is followed by a car while jogging and is reported missing the following morning. Baxter learns from the precinct’s captain, Farris, that Deacon got divorced and suffered a heart attack due to his obsession with the unsolved case. He’s advised not to involve him any further but Deacon takes vacation leave to assist in solving Baxter’s case. The next night, the police discover the body of another victim washed up beneath a bridge. Baxter learns the M.O. is consistent with the earlier murder and earlier killings: the victims were all prostitutes stabbed to death. Deacon begins investigating Albert Sparma, a suspect working at a repair store in proximity to the murders. Deacon tails Sparma. Sparma knows he is being followed and taunts Deacon by parking on the side of the highway right where one of the bodies was found. They bring Sparma in for questioning. Sparma mocks the detectives while under interrogation, and is released after provoking Deacon into an angry outburst. Also during this part of the movie the only person who has possibly seen the killer, the girl from the opening scene of the movie, is brought in to try and identify the killer but because she accidentally sees Sparma in the hallway her testimony is tainted and useless to the police. The FBI is called in to take charge of the investigation within the week, giving Deacon and Baxter less time. Farris informs Baxter that eight years prior, Sparma confessed to a murder which he couldn’t have committed since he was ten miles away from it at the time. Also that he’s obsessed with crime and is thus an unreliable suspect. Baxter and Deacon go to Sparma’s apartment and conduct an illegal search. As Deacon searches the apartment and finds a hiding spot under the floorboards that contains newspaper clippings of the crimes they suspect Sparma of committing. A police scanner in the apartment alerts Deacon that police are on their way to the apartment and he escapes from Sparma’s home after Sparma called in an “officer down”. Police arrive and Deacon barely escapes. Baxter sees Sparma watching the escape. After an unsuccessful search of Sparma’s apartment the two detectives tail Sparma to a strip club the following night. While Deacon gets coffee Sparma confronts Baxter alone. Baxter demands to know Rathbun’s location. Sparma offers to drive him to where he supposedly hid Rathbun’s body, and Baxter cautiously agrees. Sparma tries to leave without Deacon but he sees them in Sparma’s car and follows in Deacons. Sparma takes Baxter to a remote area in the desert and has him dig several holes before admitting that he never killed anyone. Baxter is skeptical, and continues digging. Sparma begins to taunt him, until Baxter snaps and strikes him in the face with a shovel, killing him. As Deacon arrives, a flashback reveals that he accidentally shot one of the survivors of his last murder case, and that Farris and Dunigan, the coroner, helped cover it up. Deacon instructs Baxter to bury Sparma in the desert. Deacon spends the night collecting everything in Sparma’s apartment and returns to the desert the following morning to find that Baxter has not buried Sparma and is still searching for the victim. Baxter is desperate to believe Sparma is the killer, hoping it will clear his conscience and close the case. Deacon advises him to forget about the case or it will haunt him for life. Later, at his home, Baxter receives an envelope sent by Deacon, containing a red barrette like the one Ronda Rathbun was wearing when she was abducted. Back in Kern County, Deacon burns everything he collected in the apartment, along with a brand new four-pack of barrettes that’s missing a red barrette.

What did the red hair flip mean in The Little Things?

Deputy Sheriff Deacon attempts to save his partner from his fate – Warner Bros./HBO Max With Baxter scrambling to convince himself and Deke that Sparma was the killer, the older sheriff — who viewers find out is no stranger to killing innocent people, on accident or otherwise — proceeds to take control of the situation.

  1. He commands Baxter to fill in the holes and bury Sparma with the promise that he’ll be back in the morning.
  2. The young detective gets busy burying evidence of his crime after failing to find any evidence of Sparma’s, and Deke returns to the suspected killer’s apartment, cleaning it out and making it appear as if Sparma has fled.

Shortly after, viewers see a new detective has been assigned to the serial killing case, and they seemingly believe the scene Deke has set for them, shifting their case to finding a fleeing Sparma. Baxter now sits at home in front of his pool, watching his two daughters play in the pool, mentally depleted and emotionally distraught by what he’s done.

  • That’s when his wife brings him a piece of mail and when he opens it, a red hair clip falls out, alluding to a piece of evidence missing from one of the killer’s victims.
  • It’s a comfort for Baxter, who cannot come to terms with potentially killing an innocent man.
  • What Baxter doesn’t see, however, is Deke cleaning Sparma’s belongings from his trunk.

He’s burning any evidence of the suspected killer, covering up the young detective’s crime. Just as he goes to shut his trunk, Deke picks up a metal box hidden beneath Sparma’s floorboards and seemingly contained items taken from his victim. But when the sheriff opens it, it’s empty.

What happened to the girl at the beginning of The Little Things?

The Opening Scene – The Little Things opens with a scene that feels straight out of a horror movie. A mysterious figure in a brown car stalks a woman named Tina Salvatore all the way to a gas station she stops at. Panicked, Tina tries to run away before managing to flag down a passing truck, so luckily for her she survives to be a witness later in the film.

What does the ending of the little thing mean?

The Little Things Ending Explained – /Film John Lee Hancock’s crime drama “The Little Things” premiered in theaters and on HBO Max in January 2021, one of the first films to be released under the COVID-induced deal whereby Warner Bros. films hit the streamer the same day as cinemas.

  • The film involves a serial killer terrorizing Los Angeles in the early 90s, and it follows the two detectives on his tail, trying to catch him before he kills again.
  • Really, though, it’s about the cops’ obsession with the case and the way that obsession leads them to disregard their morals.
  • The Little Things” currently sits at 45% Fresh on,

Many reviews mention the film’s unsatisfying ending as a mark against it; after all, “The Little Things” leaves viewers with more questions than answers, which is not what you expect from a detective story. Still, the movie looks great and boasts a talented cast; even Jared Leto turns in a chilling performance as the detectives’ number one suspect.

“It’s the little things that are important, Jimmy,” Denzel Washington’s character Joe Deacon tells Rami Malek’s Detective Jim Baxter. “It’s the little things that get you caught.” Understanding the ending of “The Little Things” — not just what happened, but why the filmmaker went down this route — requires paying attention to, well, the little things.

Read on for a look back at “The Little Things” as we attempt to explain that ambiguous ending. In early-90s L.A., a serial killer stalks women. “Six bodies, no witnesses, no evidence, no killer,” someone says, summing up the situation. Detective Jim Baxter is on the case, as is Joe Deacon, a former LAPD detective who transferred upstate after an unsolved case ruined him five years earlier and led to both a divorce and a heart attack.

Visions of the victims whose deaths he failed to close haunt Deacon. At first, Baxter and Deacon don’t get along, but Baxter realizes the older, more experienced detective might be of help. When a woman is killed and left posed naked near her broken refrigerator, Deacon follows a lead to a nearby appliance repair shop.

There, he sets his sights on Albert Leonard Sparma (Jared Leto). He tails the sunken-eyed, stringy-haired Sparma through the night and into the morning before realizing Sparma is toying with him. Baxter hauls him in for questioning, and during the interrogation, he taunts the cops, describing himself as a “crime buff” who knows the case.

  • Deacon notes that Sparma has become aroused while looking at photographs of dead bodies.
  • Meanwhile, a witness who may have escaped him at the start of the film can’t be used because she saw Sparma in handcuffs.
  • They let him go.
  • Deacon breaks into Sparma’s apartment and finds a box of newspaper clippings, but Sparma calls in an “officer down” at his apartment and Deacon narrowly escapes.

Sparma takes Baxter to a remote field of dirt, promising to show where he buried a missing jogger. Sparma directs Baxter to a specific spot, but when Baxter digs, he finds nothing. Sparma points out another spot, and another, taunting him. “I’ve never killed anybody in my entire life,” he says.

  1. If you believe me, we can get in the car and we can drive straight home.” Baxter continues digging.
  2. When Sparma brings up Baxter’s family, things turn ugly.
  3. You’re insignificant,” he spits.
  4. You don’t matter.
  5. This’ll go on and on and on, and there’s nothing you can do about it.” Baxter snaps.
  6. He hits Sparma with the shovel, killing him instantly.

Deacon arrives a moment too late, and we learn through flashback that Deacon has been tormented by his past case because he’s the one who accidentally killed one of the victims, then covered up his own crime with the help of a colleague. He returns the favor, directing Baxter to bury Sparma.

  • He heads back to the city, ditches Sparma’s car, and puts everything in his apartment in trash bags.
  • When he returns to the crime scene, he finds that Baxter has continued digging holes instead of burying the body.
  • He warns Baxter that the only way Sparma comes back to haunt him is if Baxter slips up.

After they part ways, Deacon sends a shell-shocked Baxter a red barrette, and then he burns Sparma’s belongings. Early in the film, we see a jogger followed down a dimly lit street by a car that looks like the killer’s. She wears a red barrette. Later, Detective Baxter meets with the parents of Rhonda Rathbun, a young woman who’s gone missing.

  • They tell Baxter, “When she ran, she always used a red barrette to hold her hair back.” Even later, after Deacon breaks into Sparma’s apartment and finds his box of newspaper clippings about the murders, Baxter asks him if he also saw a red barrette.
  • Clearly, the detective has come to view this red barrette as a totem, a meaningful object that will definitively tie Sparma to the missing jogger (and therefore, likely the rest of the killings).

At the end, when Deacon sends Baxter a red barrette, we think at first that he must have found it when he was bagging up Sparma’s apartment. If so, that would mean Baxter’s killing of Sparma was, not justified, exactly, because cops should not be extra-judicially killing suspects.

  1. Still, it would at least suggest that the murders will stop.
  2. Instead, moments later, we see Deacon also burning a packet of barrettes with the “Candy Apple” one missing.
  3. We can therefore conclude that Deacon bought a red barrette to release Baxter from his guilt, not wanting him to suffer for years in the same way Deacon has.

“The Little Things” ends on this ambiguous note, denying us a resolution. “The Little Things” ends without tying up its central mystery. Typically, detective films resolve the question of who’s been committing the crime, but “The Little Things” cares little about that.

  1. Instead, it’s more interested in how the case affects the two officers who become fixated on it.
  2. We are left pondering whether past mistakes should affect the future, and to what extent people should allow themselves (and each other) to be overwhelmed by guilt.
  3. Still, it’s natural to wonder: was Sparma the killer? Does the film perhaps give the audience enough clues to solve the mystery, even if its characters don’t definitively put its crimes to rest? The answer is,

not really. We know that Sparma followed the murders in the media, which a profiler says at the end of the film is something that the killer would do. We know he left town shortly after the previous round of unsolved murders. We know he tends to ditch his cars.

  • And, I mean,
  • Just look at the guy.
  • However, I think it’s a more intriguing, darker film if he’s not actually responsible.
  • Perhaps he really is just a “crime buff,” as he tells Baxter during his interrogation.
  • Cops shouldn’t be killing suspects just for having greasy hair, creepy though Sparma may be.

This interpretation puts the blame on the police force not just for killing an innocent man, but for covering it up. It’s something that happens all too often in real life. In an interview with, Denzel Washington didn’t offer any insight into the ending.

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He did, however, share an amusing anecdote from the set. It seems the veteran actor was happy to let his younger co-stars handle the more physical aspects of the film’s climax. “They were out there digging and fighting and I was in my dressing room,” he recalled. “I was like, ‘How’s it going out there? Are they still digging?’ When I came out, there were a whole lot of holes out there.

Ah, to be young again.” Director John Lee Hancock, on the other hand, spoke with regarding some of the thornier implications of the film’s ending. In particular, he handily dodged the question of whether Sparma was actually the killer.”. When I wrote it, I just tried to build in as many things pointing to his guilt as points to his innocence,” he said.

“I think there is an equal number of each in the script. I can make an argument either way.” Hancock recalled Jared Leto being dissatisfied with that ambiguity. “It’s an ugly ending any way you look at it, it’s all about the grey,” Hancock recalled telling his star. That wasn’t good enough. “He said, ‘I think I have to come to a decision about this.'” Hancock asked him not to tell him what he decided, and he let Leto play it how he wished.

With an ending as ambiguous as “The Little Things,” it can sometimes be helpful to see alternate versions. Scenes and different takes the filmmakers tried that didn’t make the cut can give us a clue as to their mindset while they made the film, which can sometimes help unlock a story.

  • In the case of “The Little Things,” however, no such alternate ending exists.
  • Director John Lee Hancock also wrote the script, and his initial draft — all the way back in the early 90s — ended much the same as it does today.
  • He felt frustrated by the crime genre at the time, in particular growing tired of what he found to be pretty formulaic story construction.

He told Entertainment Weekly that he always enjoyed the first two acts of a detective story, but the endings bored him. “By the time you’d get to the third act, you’d identified the bad guy, and then the good guy and the bad guy would go face-off, and then there would be a moment when the good guy was going to lose, but then the good guy wins heroically,” he laid out.

Who killed little Chloe?

A notorious child killer who suffocated a five-year-old girl after she accidentally knocked over his bowl of marijuana is living within walking distance of five Sydney schools. Tim Kosowicz escaped jail and a conviction after he was found not guilty on grounds of mental illness in 2005 for killing Chloe Hoson.

  1. Osowicz lured Chloe into his caravan with a kitten at the Lansvale Caravan Park, in Sydney’s west, in November 2003.
  2. The diagnosed schizophrenic then used two shopping bags to kill her before interfering with her body and dumping her in a nearby creek.
  3. He spent 15 years at Morisset Hospital’s forensic psychiatry ward for the brutal killing.

He was released into the community in 2019 but was recently spotted living unsupervised in a townhouse in Carlingford, in Sydney’s northwest. According to 7 News, Kosowicz lives near Carlingford West Public School, OneSchool’s Global Sydney Campus in Oatlands, Carlingford West Kindergarten, The King’s School, and Cumberland High School.

  • Parents living nearby told 7 News they were concerned about his presence.
  • It’s scary, that’s the first thing that came into my mind,” one parent said.
  • I have three daughters,” another added.
  • We should know, who (is) living here, if there is any criminal here we need to know it.” The NSW government said it does not comment on specific cases.

Kosowicz gave a full confession to the crime and told psychiatrists voices in his head told him to kill. Hoson’s grief-stricken mother blamed herself for the death of her daughter, saying in 2018 she wishes she had never removed the little girl from her sight.

  • Arina Beharrell’s last painful memory of Chloe was when the five-year-old burst through the door to ask her a question.
  • I was tidying up at the time.
  • I told her to leave me alone, to go outside and play,” Chloe’s mother Karina told 7 News through tears.
  • If I’d just listened to what she had to say to me, I would have told her no.

“I often think — did she even cry out for me at least once? Did she even get the chance to cry out for me?” Read related topics: Sydney

Asked By: Aidan Mitchell Date: created: Jul 20 2023

Is The Little Things Based on a true story

Answered By: William Allen Date: created: Jul 21 2023

This article contains The Little Things spoilers. You can read our spoiler-free review here. Despite what those looking for clear answers after that ending might hope, The Little Things is not based on any specific true story or serial killer investigation.

It was a 1993 screenplay penned by writer-director John Lee Hancock, However, there are similarities to several well known cases. The film even mentions the Night Stalker, aka Richard Ramirez, all while stopping short of naming names or committing to a specific lethal predator in its own yarn. This is by design.

In a recent interview with The Wrap, Hancock said “the whole reason I wrote the script” was to lean into the ambiguity and frustration of criminal investigations. Yet several ongoing serial killer investigations during the time of his writing raises questions about whether this intent was partially influenced by two open-ended searches for serial killers.

2/1/2021by David Crow Den of Geek

Asked By: Charles Johnson Date: created: Aug 07 2023

What’s the point of The Little Things

Answered By: Dennis Wood Date: created: Aug 08 2023

Denzel Washington repeats the lines, “It’s the little things that get you caught,” several times in his new movie, The Little Things, which also stars Jared Leto and Rami Malek. Those haunting lines come back full force in The Little Things ending. The Little Things is a crime drama written and directed by John Lee Hancock.

It follows veteran cop Joe “Deke” Deacon (Denzel Washington) and newer detective Jim Baxter (Rami Malek) as they try to find a serial killer. Albert Sparma (Jared Leto) becomes their prime suspect. The Little Things is a crime drama that leans heavily on character study. It’s less about the action, or even the victims and crime, and more about these three men’s relationship with perceived innocence or guilt.

The Little Things ending had a lot to unpack, so let’s dive into it.

Who is Mary Roberts in The Little Things?

Anna McKitrick : Mary Roberts.

Asked By: Isaac Moore Date: created: Sep 09 2023

What did the red hair flip mean in the little things

Answered By: Eric Martinez Date: created: Sep 11 2023

Deputy Sheriff Deacon attempts to save his partner from his fate – Warner Bros./HBO Max With Baxter scrambling to convince himself and Deke that Sparma was the killer, the older sheriff — who viewers find out is no stranger to killing innocent people, on accident or otherwise — proceeds to take control of the situation.

He commands Baxter to fill in the holes and bury Sparma with the promise that he’ll be back in the morning. The young detective gets busy burying evidence of his crime after failing to find any evidence of Sparma’s, and Deke returns to the suspected killer’s apartment, cleaning it out and making it appear as if Sparma has fled.

Shortly after, viewers see a new detective has been assigned to the serial killing case, and they seemingly believe the scene Deke has set for them, shifting their case to finding a fleeing Sparma. Baxter now sits at home in front of his pool, watching his two daughters play in the pool, mentally depleted and emotionally distraught by what he’s done.

  1. That’s when his wife brings him a piece of mail and when he opens it, a red hair clip falls out, alluding to a piece of evidence missing from one of the killer’s victims.
  2. It’s a comfort for Baxter, who cannot come to terms with potentially killing an innocent man.
  3. What Baxter doesn’t see, however, is Deke cleaning Sparma’s belongings from his trunk.

He’s burning any evidence of the suspected killer, covering up the young detective’s crime. Just as he goes to shut his trunk, Deke picks up a metal box hidden beneath Sparma’s floorboards and seemingly contained items taken from his victim. But when the sheriff opens it, it’s empty.

Asked By: Mason Henderson Date: created: Nov 21 2023

What was in the envelope in little things

Answered By: Leonars Thomas Date: created: Nov 24 2023

Kern County Deputy Sheriff Joe Deacon is sent to Los Angeles for what should have been a quick evidence-gathering assignment. Instead, he becomes embroiled in the search for a serial killer who is terrorizing the city. Deke ( Denzel Washington ), a burnt-out Kern County, CA deputy sheriff teams up with Baxter ( Rami Malek ), a crack LASD detective, to nab a serial killer. Deke’s nose for the “little things” proves eerily accurate, but his willingness to circumvent the rules embroils Baxter in a soul-shattering dilemma. Meanwhile, Deke must wrestle with a dark secret from his past. — cochiseledoux Kern County Deputy Sheriff Joe “Deke” Deacon is sent to Los Angeles for what should have been a quick evidence-gathering assignment. Instead, he becomes embroiled in the search for a killer who is terrorizing the city. Leading the hunt, L.A. Sheriff Department Sergeant Jim Baxter, impressed with Deke’s cop instincts, unofficially engages his help. But as they track the killer, Baxter is unaware that the investigation is dredging up echoes of Deke’s past, uncovering disturbing secrets that could threaten more than his case. Yearning for closure, after the case that nearly broke him, the guilt-ridden Kern County deputy sheriff with the infallible instinct, Joe Deacon, once the pride of the Los Angeles Police Department, finds himself embroiled in a high-profile manhunt that has the entire city terrified. After two long months of fruitless efforts, six victims, no witnesses, no evidence, and the maniac still on the loose, Deacon’s successor, the media-savvy lead detective, Jim Baxter, knows that, now, more than ever, he needs all the help he can get. And, more and more, this frenzied serial-killer hunt bears an uncanny resemblance to a cold case from five years earlier. But, how do you find redemption when the truth lies hidden in the little things? — Nick Riganas

One night in 1990, a girl drives on a highway, stalked by a motorist. She pulls over at a gas station, where the motorist follows her. The gas station is closed and she is forced to run through the desert. She catches the attention of a passing truck driver, escaping from the pursuit. Some time later in Bakersfield, Kern County deputy sheriff Joe “Deke” Deacon is called to the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department to collect evidence pertaining to a recent murder. Deacon is a former L.A. Sheriff’s detective and, for reasons later revealed, is disliked by most of the cops in L.A. One of the few people who seems happy to see him is Flo Dunigan, the coroner. Deacon still has a reputation for being a good detective and ends up going with recently appointed lead detective Jimmy Baxter to the scene of the latest in a string of murders that has been going on in L.A. Deacon notices similarities between the M.O. of the killing and the M.O. of an old serial murder case he was unable to solve. That night, a woman, named Ronda Rathbun, is followed by a car while jogging and is reported missing the following morning. Baxter learns from the precinct’s captain, Farris, that Deacon got divorced and suffered a heart attack due to his obsession with the unsolved case. He’s advised not to involve him any further but Deacon takes vacation leave to assist in solving Baxter’s case. The next night, the police discover the body of another victim washed up beneath a bridge. Baxter learns the M.O. is consistent with the earlier murder and earlier killings: the victims were all prostitutes stabbed to death. Deacon begins investigating Albert Sparma, a suspect working at a repair store in proximity to the murders. Deacon tails Sparma. Sparma knows he is being followed and taunts Deacon by parking on the side of the highway right where one of the bodies was found. They bring Sparma in for questioning. Sparma mocks the detectives while under interrogation, and is released after provoking Deacon into an angry outburst. Also during this part of the movie the only person who has possibly seen the killer, the girl from the opening scene of the movie, is brought in to try and identify the killer but because she accidentally sees Sparma in the hallway her testimony is tainted and useless to the police. The FBI is called in to take charge of the investigation within the week, giving Deacon and Baxter less time. Farris informs Baxter that eight years prior, Sparma confessed to a murder which he couldn’t have committed since he was ten miles away from it at the time. Also that he’s obsessed with crime and is thus an unreliable suspect. Baxter and Deacon go to Sparma’s apartment and conduct an illegal search. As Deacon searches the apartment and finds a hiding spot under the floorboards that contains newspaper clippings of the crimes they suspect Sparma of committing. A police scanner in the apartment alerts Deacon that police are on their way to the apartment and he escapes from Sparma’s home after Sparma called in an “officer down”. Police arrive and Deacon barely escapes. Baxter sees Sparma watching the escape. After an unsuccessful search of Sparma’s apartment the two detectives tail Sparma to a strip club the following night. While Deacon gets coffee Sparma confronts Baxter alone. Baxter demands to know Rathbun’s location. Sparma offers to drive him to where he supposedly hid Rathbun’s body, and Baxter cautiously agrees. Sparma tries to leave without Deacon but he sees them in Sparma’s car and follows in Deacons. Sparma takes Baxter to a remote area in the desert and has him dig several holes before admitting that he never killed anyone. Baxter is skeptical, and continues digging. Sparma begins to taunt him, until Baxter snaps and strikes him in the face with a shovel, killing him. As Deacon arrives, a flashback reveals that he accidentally shot one of the survivors of his last murder case, and that Farris and Dunigan, the coroner, helped cover it up. Deacon instructs Baxter to bury Sparma in the desert. Deacon spends the night collecting everything in Sparma’s apartment and returns to the desert the following morning to find that Baxter has not buried Sparma and is still searching for the victim. Baxter is desperate to believe Sparma is the killer, hoping it will clear his conscience and close the case. Deacon advises him to forget about the case or it will haunt him for life. Later, at his home, Baxter receives an envelope sent by Deacon, containing a red barrette like the one Ronda Rathbun was wearing when she was abducted. Back in Kern County, Deacon burns everything he collected in the apartment, along with a brand new four-pack of barrettes that’s missing a red barrette.

Asked By: Angel Wood Date: created: Jan 24 2024

What did the Red Beret mean in the little things

Answered By: Colin Anderson Date: created: Jan 27 2024

Does The Little Things Ending Offer Any Resolution To Its Viewers? – During The Little Things ending, Deacon tries to give Baxter a sense of comfort and resolution with the red barrette. The red barrette is supposed to prove that Sparma was the killer, at least of Rathbun.

  1. However, viewers learn that Deacon bought the barrette and didn’t find it at Sparma’s house.
  2. This leaves viewers with no resolution on who killed these women or if Sparma was guilty.
  3. He told Baxted he’d never killed anyone, so it’s entirely possible he was just messing with the detectives and the real killer is still out there.

And though Baxter may have had temporary relief, Deacon’s gesture may eventually not be comforting at all. The FBI have now taken over the case, and they may find the actual killer and the real red barrette, proving that Baxter killed an innocent man.

Asked By: Cole Mitchell Date: created: Dec 11 2023

What happened to the girl at the beginning of the little things

Answered By: Gavin Henderson Date: created: Dec 14 2023

The Opening Scene – The Little Things opens with a scene that feels straight out of a horror movie. A mysterious figure in a brown car stalks a woman named Tina Salvatore all the way to a gas station she stops at. Panicked, Tina tries to run away before managing to flag down a passing truck, so luckily for her she survives to be a witness later in the film.