Asked By: Jake Torres Date: created: Mar 17 2024

What is the nursery rhyme about the spider and the fly

Answered By: Howard Morris Date: created: Mar 17 2024

There was an old lady who swallowed a fly –

  1. There was an old lady who swallowed a flyI don’t know why she swallowed a fly – perhaps she’ll die!
  2. There was an old lady who swallowed a spider,That wriggled and wiggled and tiggled inside her;She swallowed the spider to catch the fly;
  3. I don’t know why she swallowed a fly – Perhaps she’ll die!
  4. There was an old lady who swallowed a bird;How absurd to swallow a bird.She swallowed the bird to catch the spider,She swallowed the spider to catch the fly;
  5. I don’t know why she swallowed a fly – Perhaps she’ll die!
  6. There was an old lady who swallowed a cat;Fancy that to swallow a cat!She swallowed the cat to catch the bird,She swallowed the bird to catch the spider,She swallowed the spider to catch the fly;
  7. I don’t know why she swallowed a fly – Perhaps she’ll die!
  8. There was an old lady that swallowed a dog;What a hog, to swallow a dog;She swallowed the dog to catch the cat,She swallowed the cat to catch the bird,She swallowed the bird to catch the spider,She swallowed the spider to catch the fly;
  9. I don’t know why she swallowed a fly – Perhaps she’ll die!
  10. There was an old lady who swallowed a cow,I don’t know how she swallowed a cow;She swallowed the cow to catch the dog,She swallowed the dog to catch the cat,She swallowed the cat to catch the bird,She swallowed the bird to catch the spider,She swallowed the spider to catch the fly;
  11. I don’t know why she swallowed a fly – Perhaps she’ll die!

There was an old lady who swallowed a horse. She’s dead, of course!

What does it mean to swallow a fly?

Here’s what Professor Hallux has to say: – Don’t worry, you’re not going to turn into a fly! If you swallowed it then it’s probably ended up in your stomach. It will get digested along with anything else you’ve eaten (hopefully tasty food rather than more flies!) and then whatever’s left will come out the other end when you visit the toilet.

What is the meaning of swallow flies?

Noun Any one of several species of Hippoboscidæ which infest swallows, as Stenopteryx hirundinis.

Asked By: Abraham Murphy Date: created: Apr 05 2024

Why oh why did you swallow a fly

Answered By: Steven Roberts Date: created: Apr 06 2024

Lyrics – The following is one version of the lyrics to demonstrate the song’s cumulative nature: There was an old lady who swallowed a fly, I don’t know why she swallowed a fly – perhaps she’ll die! There was an old lady who swallowed a spider That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her; She swallowed the spider to catch the fly; I don’t know why she swallowed a fly – perhaps she’ll die! There was an old lady who swallowed a bird; How absurd to swallow a bird! She swallowed the bird to catch the spider That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her, She swallowed the spider to catch the fly; I don’t know why she swallowed a fly – perhaps she’ll die! There was an old lady who swallowed a cat; Fancy that to swallow a cat! She swallowed the cat to catch the bird, She swallowed the bird to catch the spider That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her, She swallowed the spider to catch the fly; I don’t know why she swallowed a fly – perhaps she’ll die! There was an old lady that swallowed a dog; What a hog to swallow a dog! She swallowed the dog to catch the cat, She swallowed the cat to catch the bird, She swallowed the bird to catch the spider That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her, She swallowed the spider to catch the fly; I don’t know why she swallowed a fly – perhaps she’ll die! There was an old lady who swallowed a goat; Just opened her throat and swallowed a goat! She swallowed the goat to catch the dog, She swallowed the dog to catch the cat, She swallowed the cat to catch the bird, She swallowed the bird to catch the spider That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her, She swallowed the spider to catch the fly; I don’t know why she swallowed a fly – perhaps she’ll die! There was an old lady who swallowed a cow; I don’t know how she swallowed a cow! She swallowed the cow to catch the goat, She swallowed the goat to catch the dog, She swallowed the dog to catch the cat, She swallowed the cat to catch the bird, She swallowed the bird to catch the spider That wriggled and jiggled and tickled inside her, She swallowed the spider to catch the fly; I don’t know why she swallowed a fly – perhaps she’ll die! There was an old lady who swallowed a horse.

Asked By: Wallace Hernandez Date: created: Dec 10 2023

Had so many children she didn t know what to do

Answered By: Gregory Nelson Date: created: Dec 11 2023

Lyrics – The most common version of the rhyme is: There was an old woman who lived in a shoe. She had so many children, she didn’t know what to do. She gave them some broth without any bread; Then whipped them all soundly and put them to bed. The earliest printed version in Joseph Ritson ‘s Gammer Gurton’s Garland in 1784 has the coarser last line: She whipp’d all their bums, and sent them to bed.

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Who wrote there was an old lady who swallowed some snow?

Lucille Colandro has written many books for children, including the bestselling There Was an Old Lady series illustrated by Jared Lee.

Asked By: Kyle Simmons Date: created: Nov 28 2023

Are nursery rhymes based on a true story

Answered By: Landon Robinson Date: created: Nov 30 2023

Nursery rhymes are cute little poems, but some of them have shocking true stories behind them. Check out. The famous rhyme ‘Humpty Dumpty’ was inspired by King Richard III of England who had a humpback. No one can imagine the kind of weird and scary stories from which some nursery rhymes originate.

What is the oldest nursery rhyme book?

References –

  1. ^ Wolf, Shelby; Coats, Karen; Enciso, Patricia A.; Jenkins, Christine (2010). Handbook of Research on Children’s and Young Adult Literature, Routledge.p.188. ISBN 9780203843543,
  2. ^ “Tommy Thumb’s Pretty Song Book”, British Library.
  3. ^ Lynch, Jack. The Oxford Handbook of British Poetry, 1660-1800, Oxford University Press.p.90.
  4. ^ British Library, “Tommy Thumb’s Pretty Song-Book”, retrieved 14 November 2009.
  5. ^ “Rhyme book fetches £45,500”,13 December 2001, Telegraph.co.uk, Retrieved 14 November 09.
  6. ^ Jump up to: a b H. Carpenter and M. Prichard, The Oxford Companion to Children’s Literature (Oxford University Press, 1984), pp.533–4.
  7. ^ William S. Baring-Gould and Ceil Baring-Gould, The Annotated Mother Goose, pp.24–43.

Which little girl lost her sleep in the nursery rhyme?

Little Bo-Peep by Mother Goose Little Bo-Peep has lost her sheep, And can’t tell where to find them; Leave them alone, and they’ll come home, Bringing their tails behind them. Little Bo-Peep fell fast asleep, And dreamt she heard them bleating; But when she awoke, she found it a joke, For they were still all fleeting.

  • Then up she took her little crook, Determined for to find them; She found them indeed, but it made her heart bleed, For they’d left their tails behind them.
  • It happened one day, as Bo-Peep did stray There she espied their tails, side by side, All hung on a tree to dry.
  • She heaved a sigh and wiped her eye, And over the hillocks she raced; And tried what she could, as a shepherdess should, That each tail be properly placed.
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Source: The Dorling Kindersley Book of Nursery Rhymes (2000) : Little Bo-Peep by Mother Goose

What is the moral of The Spider and the Fly?

The Spider and the Fly (poem) 1829 poem by Mary Howitt The Spider and the Fly by Mary Howitt Subject(s)Genre(s), Publication date1829 ( 1829 ) ” The Spider and the Fly ” is a poem by (1799–1888), published in 1829. The first line of the poem is “‘Will you walk into my parlour?’ said the Spider to the Fly.” The story tells of a cunning spider who entraps a fly into its web through the use of seduction and manipulation.

The poem is a against those who use and to disguise their true intentions. The poem was published with the subtitle “A new Version of an old Story” in The New Year’s Gift and Juvenile Souvenir, which has a publication year of 1829 on its title page but, as the title would suggest, was released before New Year’s Day and was reviewed in magazines as early as October 1828.

The opening line is one of the most recognized and quoted first lines in all of English verse. Often misquoted as “Step into my parlour” or “Come into my parlour”, it has become an, often used to indicate a false offer of help or friendship that is in fact a trap.

What is the lesson of The Spider and the Fly?

The poem takes the form of an alternating dialogue between Spider and Fly: ‘said the Spider to the Fly.’ The story has an overall message: ‘And take a lesson from this tale’: Don’t let yourself be tricked by sweet, flattering words. Some students may need background on what spiders eat and how they catch their food.

Asked By: Carlos Washington Date: created: Nov 07 2023

Is a nursery rhyme a fairy tale

Answered By: Adam Cox Date: created: Nov 08 2023

What’s a nursery rhyme vs. a fairy tale? – First things first, our boy Jack plays a starring role in both nursery rhymes and fairy tales—is there something these two have in common beyond, obviously, his name? A is “a short, simple poem or song for very young children,” such as “Hickory, Dickory, Dock,” “Little Bo Peep,” “One, Two, Buckle My Shoe,” and yes, “Jack Sprat.” A is a story “about elves, hobgoblins, dragons, fairies, or other magical creatures,” usually featuring some form of enchantment.

Asked By: Oliver Ward Date: created: Feb 06 2024

What happens if a fly goes in your ear

Answered By: Ashton Gonzales Date: created: Feb 09 2024

Summary – A bug in your ear can be uncomfortable but usually does not lead to any serious complications. Symptoms include redness, itching, swelling, drainage, and pain. You may also hear scratchy noises or have moving sensations inside the ear. To remove a bug from your ear, try tilting your head to the side and shaking gently.

  1. Calleja T. ‘A bugging feeling’: a live foreign body in the ear, Arch Dis Child,2020 Jul;105(7):689. doi:10.1136/archdischild-2019-316881
  2. Alfaifi AJ, Khan LA, Mokarbesh HM. Light-assisted removal of ear canal live insect–a noninvasive approach for first level responders, J Family Med Prim Care.2019 Sep;8(9):3042–4. doi:10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_443_19
  3. Schwanke L, Chen D, Lomiguen CM, Chin J. Adult Popillia japonica as an otorhinolaryngologic invasive foreign body in a rural area, Cureus.2020 Dec;12(12):e12046. doi:10.7759/cureus.12046
  4. Mengi E, Demihran E, Arslan IB. Aural myiasis: case report. North Clin Istanb.2014;1(3):175–7. doi:10.14744/nci.2014.96967
  5. Texas Children’s Hospital. Insects in the ear,
  6. MedlinePlus. Ear infection – acute,
  7. Mount Sinai. Ruptured eardrum,
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By Carrie Madormo, RN, MPH Carrie Madormo, RN, MPH, is a health writer with over a decade of experience working as a registered nurse. She has practiced in a variety of settings including pediatrics, oncology, chronic pain, and public health. Thanks for your feedback!

What does 3 swallows mean?

How many swallows make a summer? Proverbially, one is not enough. “I am wondering if the answer should be two. Or should it be 17?” says Tim Sparks of the Natural Environment Research Council’s station at Monks Wood in Cambridgeshire, and part of the UK Phenology Network.

Phenology is the science of when things happen. One swallow does not make a summer, because individual birds may overshoot, arrive too early, have been blown north by accident, and they tend to retreat swiftly if conditions are harsh. The presence of two swallows might well be a sign of preliminary nesting behaviour.

The presence of three, or 17, suggests that they mean business. However, the swallows sighted in south-east England this week do not mean winter is over early this year. On the principle that nature usually knows best, phenologists have kept records for six years, including the first frogspawn, bud bursts, snowdrops and the earliest cuttings of the lawn.

  1. Peacock butterflies and painted ladies have been seen fluttering by, because even though nights have been cold the sunny days must have seemed inviting.
  2. Weather records have been kept in central England for nearly 350 years.
  3. According to the Met Office, six of the seven warmest years since 1659 have occurred since 1990.

A pattern of milder winters and longer summers is now difficult to mistake. The phenology network had reports of the first snowdrops and frogspawn before Christmas 2003. During December, 72 people cut their lawns – one of them on Boxing Day. The consensus, Sparks says, is that spring is arriving on average three weeks earlier than 30 years ago; autumn at least a week later than it did.

  1. Traditionally, according to the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, the first passeriformes should be the sand martins in March, followed by the house martins, with the swallows appearing in the second half of April.
  2. But the presence of early swallows and the first house martins seems to confirm the bigger picture of a changing Britain.

“This does seem to be a pretty unprecedented event,” said an RSPB spokesman. : How many swallows make a summer?

What does not make a summer?

one swallow does not a summer make – Wiktionary, the free dictionary From Wiktionary, the free dictionary

  • An to the return of at the start of the,
  • of ( mía khelidṑn éar ou poieî ), a remark found in ‘s (1098a18: “one swallow does not a summer make, nor one fine day; similarly one day or brief time of happiness does not make a person entirely happy”), itself inspired by the fable by,
  • The unusual English word order (in use from 1920) may be intended to reflect the Greek word order, or it may be influenced by the line “Stone walls do not a prison make,” from by (1642).
Asked By: Landon Watson Date: created: Sep 06 2023

What do crows represent

Answered By: Bernard Taylor Date: created: Sep 06 2023

All in all, crows represent death, danger, misfortune, and illness but also rebirth, self-reflection, intelligence, and loyalty, and as such can be both good and bad omens, depending on the culture and beliefs. They have carved their place into mythology, literature, and popular culture.