Asked By: Joseph Nelson Date: created: Sep 04 2023

Who are 0203 numbers

Answered By: Dennis Murphy Date: created: Sep 04 2023

0203 and 0207 numbers are for inner London. However, we do charge a once-off connection fee for 0207 numbers.0203 numbers are free of charge.

Asked By: Timothy Nelson Date: created: Feb 13 2024

Where is 0203 code number

Answered By: Nathan Ward Date: created: Feb 13 2024

What are 020 Numbers? – Telephone numbers that start with the 020 area code, including 0203, 0204, 0207, and 0208, are for London and the surrounding area. There are no official differences between the London telephone numbers that start with 0207 and those with 020, 0203, 0204, or 0208.0207 and 0208 area code number ranges have run out and as a result, 0203 and 0204 numbers have been introduced.

Should I answer 020 numbers?

Bear in mind that a call from an 020 number does not necessarily mean it is a scam – as mentioned, it may be a genuine caller from London, although it is always worth being vigilant if receiving a call from an unrecognised number.

Can I find out who a phone number belongs to?

The best way to find out who called you from a phone number is to use a reverse phone lookup service such as TruthFinder, Intelius, Instant Checkmate, Spokeo, or BeenVerified. A reverse phone lookup is a simple, quick way to find information about the owner of a phone number.

Asked By: Malcolm Baker Date: created: Feb 14 2023

How do you stop cold callers

Answered By: Isaiah Martinez Date: created: Feb 15 2023

Stop calls and texts from a charity – If you want to stop calls and texts from a charity, you should register with the Telephone Preference Service, Charities shouldn’t make fundraising calls to you if you’ve registered with this service. This includes charities registered in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

  • You can also contact the Fundraising Preference Service if you want to stop getting calls and texts from a charity registered in England, Wales or Northern Ireland.
  • They’ll tell them to remove your contact details within 28 days.
  • The best way to do this is to register on their website,
  • You can register over the phone if you prefer.

Fundraising Preference Service Telephone: 0300 3033 517 Monday to Friday, 8.30am to 5.30pm Saturday, 9am to midday Calls to this number can cost up to 10p a minute from a landline, or between 3p and 40p a minute from a mobile (your phone supplier can tell you how much you’ll pay).

Who is 0203 901 7000?

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#1

Today I received four email messages from PayPal (yes it was them, I checked). Each one was telling me that a bloke had made a request for $499 to buy stuff in Boots. I don’t think Boots is in the USA, so why was the request in US$? So far so obvious. PayPal were helping me out, right? I logged into my PayPal account (password, 6-digit code texted to my registered mobile).

  1. On my dashboard there were four identical requests from the guy.
  2. On each one I could click for details.
  3. So I clicked one and got a message from PayPal saying that this was a suspicious transaction and that if I wanted to stop it to ring this number (a UK freephone number).
  4. I rang the number and went through what sounded like the normal security questions.

He even sent me a six-digit security code for me to input. The guy had a very bad accent and it was not easy to tell what he was saying, I ended up having to spell my email address and the security question answers. After I had given him my email address and answered the two security questions that I had logged with PayPal, he started to ask which bank account, what credit card etc., I was starting to get suspicious at this point and told him so. I immediately changed my password, changed the two security questions and then cancelled each of the four requests. I tried to raise the issue with PayPal but couldn’t find a way to do it. I tried to raise “a case” but PayPal said that they don’t do that on that type of transaction.

  • They no longer have a phone number to ring, or at least not one that I could find.
  • Take note of this! During this cancellation process I noticed that the “note from PayPal” wasn’t from PayPal, it was a note from the bloke (PayPal facilitates that!) PayPal are covered because in small print it says note from,(the bloke).

The only good thing is that my credit card registered with PayPal was cancelled and replaced a year or so ago, on the advice of my bank due to another security concern. It looks like I caught it in time, but it depends upon how rapidly they were able to use the information they got from me.

#2

The sharks are out there. One of my biggest worries was that my elderly parents would become victims. Our family members eventually took interventions to secure those vulnerable matters.

Thread starter #3

The sharks are out there. One of my biggest worries was that my elderly parents would become victims. Our family members eventually took interventions to secure those vulnerable matters. My Mum developed Alzheimer’s and fortunately we saw it coming in time to get the two Lasting Power of Attorney agreements (Health & Welfare and Finance & Property), known as LPA’s.

  • When the time came, we were able to close her credit card accounts and remove her debit cards from her.
  • We contacted the bank to make sure that they didn’t send her any replacements automatically, or even a cheque book! She could quite happily chat to potential scammers and be safe from financial harm.

The LPA’s are the product of the British Government and having set them up for my mother and used them, I can wholeheartedly give a gold star for clarity to whoever designed the website. I also can recommend that if you have elderly parents, even if they are fully alert, then set up the LPAs.

  • You will not be able to set them up once they have “gone” as there are third party tests to complete.
  • Once that happens you will have to go to the Office of the Public Guardian (OPG) – and that is a paperwork and legal nightmare! My mate told me what happened to him and he’s a very clever guy.
  • His Mother and older sister refused to get LPA’s and he had to go the OPG route.

I was so impressed with the LPA’s and the protection they provide that once I had got them for my mother, I set them up for me and my wife so that if we went gaga (age or accident), then they would be saved from the OPG route (which I repeat would be a long-lasting arse-ache for my daughters for the rest of my life and/or my wife’s.

#4

Apart from cancelling my PayPal account, not sure what else I can do. Any suggestions? You said you already changed your password. That’s good, as long as it’s unique to that account, and comprised of at least a dozen random characters, including capitals, numbers, and symbols.

  1. It also sounds like you’re using two-factor authentication. Good.
  2. Now check your history to confirm you haven’t made any PayPal payments.
  3. None? All good.
  4. Remember back in the 1980’s, how you were told not to have anonymous unprotected sex at the gay bathhouse? How you shouldn’t exchange needles with other intravenous drug users? It’s the same thing today.

There are dangers lurking, but if you are sensible and abide by the commonly accepted rules, you can mitigate the risk. Long before people were being duped on the interwebs, people were losing their money by mailing checks for products advertised in the backs of magazines, falling for the slick pitches of phone solicitors, and even forking over cash to hucksters traveling town-to-town in horse drawn wagons.

#6

Hi Steve, Do you use your phone or a Personal computer to connect to paypal? Hope you’ll have chance and a good issue. Have a NIce Day. Thierry

Thread starter #7

I had a similar scam email yesterday saying that I’d had a request for a significant payment for Argos vouchers, Checking the app showed that there were no messages generated by PayPal.that being the case I just deleted the email, Absolute bunch of wankers.and I wish in some way there was a way to hurt them,because someone somewhere is bound to fall for this, Also @ThierryGTLTS I don’t use the PayPal app. I used my laptop. On that I can see who the email is from very easily. Once I saw they were all from PayPal, I logged in. But that was what the scammer was hoping for! I thought I was doing everything correctly.

I suppose I was, it’s just that my suspicion relaxed a bit once I knew I was on the proper PayPal website. If the scammer guy on the phone hadn’t had the exact same accent as all the other scam phone calls of the “there is something wrong with your computer.” type, then I might not have got as suspicious as quickly as I did.

Beware! You are not even safe on the proper security protected PayPal website!

Thread starter #9

I see that this thread has been moved to the Lounge instead of the General Forum. I will look out for that in future. Not sure I even knew it existed; I just go for What’s New.

#10

I see that this thread has been moved to the Lounge instead of the General Forum. I will look out for that in future. Not sure I even knew it existed; I just go for What’s New. Probably a good place for this. But I just removed my credit card from PayPal and found a very low monthly payment. I’ll figure that out later because I’ve no idea what it’s for.??

Thread starter #11

Probably a good place for this. But I just removed my credit card from PayPal and found a very low monthly payment. I’ll figure that out later because I’ve no idea what it’s for.?? It is low so that you don’t notice, but multiply that by thousands, tens of thousands or even millions of accounts and soon you’re talking real money.

Thread starter #12

13th Dec’22. Yet another attempt to defraud me via PayPal. I’m out! At 11:10, I closed my account and asked PayPal to delete all my data. Confirmed by 6-digit code. Then I got an email from PayPal saying that they are working on it and it may take 30 days to confirm the status.

  • 30 days!) It would appear that there is time yet for more attempts to defraud me.
  • What irritates me is that I could find no sure way to inform PayPal what was happening, could find no way to get advice from them, their FAQs were no FN use.
  • The process of closing my account allowed me the opportunity to give feedback, which I used.

Maybe they will pay attention now? But I doubt it. Last edited: Dec 13, 2022

#13

Any chance removing your bank account data from paypal or to withdraw authorization of paypal to debit your bank accounts?

#14

13th Dec’22. Yet another attempt to defraud me via PayPal. Is someone sending you a payment request any different than the requests I get daily? I have emails offering HotRussianBabes, Free Energy, Male Enhancement, new storm windows, and squirting. On Facebook, chicks with their boobs hanging out all want to be my friend.

Thread starter #15

Any chance removing your bank account data from paypal or to withdraw authorization of paypal to debit your bank accounts? Thanks for the idea, I didn’t believe that was possible. But doesn’t it undermine the whole concept? Anyway, it’s gone now, they confirmed the account was deleted this morning.

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Thread starter #16

As @Arminius says, you should be able to put a block on your account to that provider with your on-line banking. That’s like with the funny glowing magical box thing where you’re reading this Alternatively, if you send me all your bank details, I can do it for you. What pissed me off to be honest, was that PayPal was facilitating this. In addition, I could not find any way to get PayPal to pay attention. All, I could do was to open each attempt and then cancel it. A few days later, PayPal emailed me to say that the request had been cancelled.

Thread starter #17

Is someone sending you a payment request any different than the requests I get daily? I have emails offering HotRussianBabes, Free Energy, Male Enhancement, new storm windows, and squirting. On Facebook, chicks with their boobs hanging out all want to be my friend.

  • For these 21st Century annoyances, I filter, delete, and block.
  • Every day the mail man delivers advertisements intended to rid me of my hard-earned cash.
  • Even my own bank and financial companies send me junk.
  • Cancelling my accounts and burying all my money in the back yard never really occurred to me.
  • I can totally understand your view.

Anything that turns up on my laptop I can block and send into oblivion. Anything that turns up on my phone ditto. And I never accept any cookies other than the essential ones and occasionally the performance ones. I also use an Ad Blocker which gets rid of the vast majority of ads for me.

  • But these messages were from PayPal and I didn’t want to block PayPal (not initially).
  • What I thought worthy of making a thread was that the scam message was in what I thought was a safe place.
  • I was on the PayPal website and had gone through all the usual security checks.
  • Now I see with new eyes, the message to ring this number was marked “from (the scammer)” and not from PayPal.

I believe that I am as aware as the next guy about scams and cons etc, but I missed that one. I came close to giving away the farm. The same evening of my first experience with the PayPal scam, there was a guy on the news who had fallen for the PayPal scam and got relieved of a lot of money.

  • His job was with computers and web stuff and he was deeply embarrassed.
  • I guess he was just too confident in his own abilities.
  • The extra irritation for me was not being able to much that felt active and final.
  • I couldn’t tell PayPal and I couldn’t delete the message.
  • All I could do was to cancel the scammer’s request.

Several days later the requests were still there cluttering up my account. Then some more arrived.

#18

Just closed my PayPal account and I did the security “dance”. There was one monthly payment of $1.44 that was not identified by PayPal. Like Steve said; it’s small enough that you don’t really notice. In the past 5 years I’ve only used PayPal 3 times (I think) to purchase items.

I never had a problem with this purchase/delivery method. But using my credit card seems a little safer, even though it’s not completely safe. On my iPhone I’ve been using “Wallet” for local purchases. It shows my purchases immediately. And recently my bank has requested that I update my info. Why? The request seems vague and unnecessary.

I’ve been using this bank for 35+ years. Additional security maybe?

#19

I had similar in the UK, Lynn Dunkr “lynn dunkr sent you a money request

Fraudulent Activity Found In Your Account, Amount £649.99 GBP Has Been Debited From Your Account For A Purchase Of DECATHLON GIFT CARDS, If It’s Not You Reach Us Immediately @ +44-800-368-6158″​

I contacted PayPal – apparently any PayPal member can request money from another user, to request – they don’t need your password. It’s just a request for payment, you can refuse it and Paypal reassured me that they won’t pay until I click to tell them to do so.

  • I clicked and now it still sows but as cancelled so I can’t click it by mistake The conversation: me: Hi.
  • I received what appeared to be a fraudulent email asking me to pay £649.99.
  • I never heard of the requester.
  • I looked at my PayPal account and this payment request is actually there in my pending section.

Please tell me what to do and please look into why a PayPal account holder is able to attempt fraud on my account like this. Paypal: ” Hi My name is Sowmya, thank you for contacting PayPal Messaging! I see that you are concerned regarding the payment request received.

Firstly I would like to thank you for highlighting this with us. I would request you to please forward the payment request email to, Not to worry, be assured that there will be no funds debited automatically from your account for the invoice/payment request, -and – Please note that any PayPal user can send invoice request to anyone.

As we have received same complaint from several customers we are reporting every case to our investigation team and post their review they will take necessary action. I request your understanding in this matter.”

#21

I had similar in the UK, Lynn Dunkr “lynn dunkr sent you a money request

Fraudulent Activity Found In Your Account, Amount £649.99 GBP Has Been Debited From Your Account For A Purchase Of DECATHLON GIFT CARDS, If It’s Not You Reach Us Immediately @ +44-800-368-6158″​

I contacted PayPal – apparently any PayPal member can request money from another user, to request – they don’t need your password. It’s just a request for payment, you can refuse it and Paypal reassured me that they won’t pay until I click to tell them to do so.

  • I clicked and now it still sows but as cancelled so I can’t click it by mistake The conversation: me: Hi.
  • I received what appeared to be a fraudulent email asking me to pay £649.99.
  • I never heard of the requester.
  • I looked at my PayPal account and this payment request is actually there in my pending section.

Please tell me what to do and please look into why a PayPal account holder is able to attempt fraud on my account like this. Paypal: ” Hi My name is Sowmya, thank you for contacting PayPal Messaging! I see that you are concerned regarding the payment request received.

Firstly I would like to thank you for highlighting this with us. I would request you to please forward the payment request email to, Not to worry, be assured that there will be no funds debited automatically from your account for the invoice/payment request, -and – Please note that any PayPal user can send invoice request to anyone.

As we have received same complaint from several customers we are reporting every case to our investigation team and post their review they will take necessary action. I request your understanding in this matter.” Well that response raises my temperature a bit.

#22

Sadly I don’t suppose there’s any way they can stop a PayPal member making a payment request – scary thing is that I do use PayPal at Decathlon. Maybe it’s just a coincidence. Only thing PayPal can do, I imagine, is ban people who make these incorrect requests from the platform

#23

Same happened to me 15th Nov. as I was travelling. The fake number is +44-800-260-5954. It looks absolutely genuine until, as the OP did, you chat to the “helpdesk guy” and he starts to ask for credit card number plus the CVV. be warned it sound genuine as they reel off your last 3 to 4 Paypal transactions somehow not just the fake ones they hook you with.

#24

I closed my PayPal account after: ** they refused to help me when I gave them all proof the article was not as described ** they reinstated this totalitarian fascist move, in a hidden way

Thread starter #25

Sadly I don’t suppose there’s any way they can stop a PayPal member making a payment request – scary thing is that I do use PayPal at Decathlon. Maybe it’s just a coincidence. Only thing PayPal can do, I imagine, is ban people who make these incorrect requests from the platform Or ban contact details inside the note and automatically delete all requests that contain contact details.

Thread starter #26

, I was lucky in that I didn’t get hit. The same day my son did and is £13,000 down as his bank let through 13 £1,000 transactions within 10 mins. Yikes!

Are 0203 numbers safe?

Scammers are using 0203 phone numbers to give the appearance of being located in London. We explain how to stay safe if you are contacted by these criminals. – I was recently contacted by someone I like to call an ‘0203 phone number scammer’. These are people who call from a number that makes them seem like a legitimate London-based organisation, when they are anything but. In this article, I explain my experience with these phone scammers, and explain how you can stay safe if you are contacted.

Is 0203 a premium number?

Are 0203 Numbers Free on Sky Mobile? – You do not have to pay extra charges when you call 02 numbers such as 0203. As outlined in, calls to 02 numbers are included in your plan allowance. Additionally, calls to UK landlines starting 02 are included in the plan for Unlimited Calls and Texts.

How can I trace a phone number?

1. Use a Reverse Phone Lookup Search Engine – Conducting a reverse phone lookup can be one of the most effective ways to locate a phone number’s location. With a reverse phone lookup, you enter a phone number and receive information about the person who owns that number.

  • By using a trusted service such as WhitePages or TrueCaller, you can access the person’s name, address, and even social media profiles.
  • You can then utilize the address to pinpoint the phone’s location on Google Maps or another mapping program.
  • If you choose to conduct a reverse phone lookup, it is essential to be aware that it is not always 100% accurate.

This is because several people may own the same number or have recently changed their number. However, this method can be helpful if you are looking for a general idea of a phone number’s location.

Why is cold calling illegal?

What is telephone consumer protection act? – The Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) is a piece of legislation that protects customers and text messages. It regulates how and when businesses may contact customers and gives them the option to opt out of receiving such cold calls and texts. What is telephone consumer protection act

Why am I getting so many spam calls all of a sudden 2023?

Why am I receiving so many more spam calls? –

  • Usually, you receive spam calls because your number has been sold to scammers. They try their best to defraud you by calling you repeatedly.
  • Make sure you report these scammers regularly to Better Business Bureau and Federal Trade Commission.

Asked By: Carl Howard Date: created: Aug 16 2023

Why is cold calling so scary

Answered By: Jack Smith Date: created: Aug 18 2023

Most salespeople dread their initial encounter with a prospect since they have no idea how they would react to a cold call. SDRs fear that the call may be rejected, that they’d be faced with a ton of objections, or that they would anger the prospects by bothering them.

Asked By: Timothy Henderson Date: created: Feb 27 2024

How do I know if a number is a spam number

Answered By: Ethan Green Date: created: Mar 01 2024

Scammer Phone Numbers List – If you’re constantly getting scam calls, there’s a good chance that someone is behind the numbers. To avoid falling victim to this type of caller, use a free scammer phone number lookup service to find out who they are. Using this service, you’ll be able to find out who is calling you from any given number and report them to the police.

While there are many reasons for getting spam calls, one common factor is your phone’s area code. The 818 area code, for example, has many scam callers. This is because many unlisted numbers fall under this code, and this area code is home to many businesses. This number is a good candidate for being hacked by unscrupulous companies.

While the free services mentioned above are good for finding scam phone numbers, some more popular ones can be slow. That’s why you’ll want to use a fast service. A scammer phone numbers list should be quick and easy to use. This way, you can quickly find a scammer’s information without wasting time figuring out how to use a service.

  1. A free online service can also be helpful if you’re suspicious of a call.
  2. These services can help you find out the name and address of a caller before answering.
  3. You can also lookup scammers by phone number, ensuring that you’re never a victim of a scammer.
  4. Scammers can be challenging to find, but with free scammer phone number lookup services, finding out if your phone number is on the scammer list is easy.
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Many of these services have very comprehensive databases and can give you background information on almost any number. You can even find out if a number has been reported to the authorities. If it has, report the number to the authorities immediately. Another good website that helps you find scam phone numbers is EasyPeopleSearch.

This site is linked to several state sites and has an extensive database of public records. The site is user-friendly and provides relevant information about scam phone numbers. You can search for scammers’ numbers by name and address, giving you the exact information you need. The best scammer phone numbers list services are reliable and easy to use.

A lot of scammers are intelligent enough to know how to avoid becoming victims. With a good list, you’ll be able to avoid wasting your time and money. The list contains accurate information and is updated regularly. A good scammer phone number list site will also provide additional information about a scammer, so you can use it to protect yourself.

Scammers are trying to trick you into giving them your personal information. These scammers pose as legitimate businesses and will try to trick you into giving them your credit card information or other sensitive information. Scammers often promise a free product or service in exchange for your credit card details.

This is called phishing. Scammers are getting more creative when it comes to this type of scam. Steps to Verify a Suspicious Phone Number The first step in verifying whether a phone number is a spam is to determine if it is actually in use. You can do this by using a service such as the National Do Not Call Registry or contacting the phone company directly.

If the number is not currently used, it may be considered spam. If the number is considered spam, the next step is determining if the caller is legitimate. You can check their contact information and see if it matches any known spammers. Additionally, it may be helpful to look for patterns in the calls made to the number.

For example, are all calls coming from within a specific area code or country? Once these details are gathered, it may be easier to decide if the calls are legitimate or not. If it is determined that the number is spam or illegitimate, then you can take a few different steps.

One option is to block all future calls from that number. Another option is to put a sign on your property warning people not to call. Finally, you can also report the number to your local authorities or service providers who deal with spam and telemarketing issues. Resources to Find Out More Information About Spam There are many resources to check if a number is a spam.

Here are some of the most common:

Spamhaus: This website provides a database of known spammer addresses and other information about spam. You can use this information to determine whether a number is a spam.Google Search: Type in “spam” and see what comes up. This will give you tips on how to avoid being spammed and information on the types of spam.Anti-spam software: Some anti-spam software includes features that can help you determine whether a number is a spam.

Conclusion If you have a suspicious or unknown phone number, there are a few ways to check if it is scam. One way to check is to use a reverse lookup tool. This will allow you to see if the number has been registered with any other company or individual.

Additionally, you can use a spam identifier tool, such as Spamcop, to see if the number has been registered with any known spammers. If you’re unsure if a number is spam, you can use tools like SpamAssassin or the Botnet Checker to help determine whether it’s safe to send that number to your customers.

If you’re not sure how to set up either of those tools, there are many other third-party spam detection applications available online that should be able to help. Just be sure to test the application before using it on a large scale so that you don’t end up blocking legitimate emails from your customers.

Is this number a scammer 0203?

0203 Cons –

Scams — Perhaps the only real con of owning an 0203 number is their connection with scams. Many 0203 numbers are affiliated with computer virus scams where desktop owners are charged to remove fraudulent malware after taking a “courtesy Microsoft call”. Some people also realise many virtual businesses use 0203 numbers to give off the appearance of being based in London. This practice is also viewed as a con, by some people. In some cases, opting for a “traditional” 0207 number could be the right route.

On the whole, 0203 numbers are a natural choice for plenty of companies. Their central location, worldwide recognition and availability are big plus points for investing in the mysterious 0203 prefix. This is evidenced by how many authoritative organisations are beginning to use 0203 numbers for their external communications. Image courtesy of area-codes.org.uk Highly trusted organisations such as the BBC and The Guardian and Observer newspapers, as well as major corporations such as Bank of England and Transport for London, have all adopted 0203 numbers. When you take this into account, an 0203 prefix is an up and coming contact number.

Who called me from 02036411643?

Nuisance call – These are typically marketing calls trying to promote a service or product they may be a live call but could be an automated recorded message. If you’re finding that you receive a lot of these we’d suggest that in addition to reporting the number that you also register for the TPS,

Who called me 02037402163?

Caller identification ⚠️ Our vigilant and trustworthy community has reported that the phone number 02037402163 is primarily associated with scammers. The callers are reported to be pretending to be from various companies, and their primary motive is to engage in scam activities.

Who is 0203 901 7000?

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#1

Today I received four email messages from PayPal (yes it was them, I checked). Each one was telling me that a bloke had made a request for $499 to buy stuff in Boots. I don’t think Boots is in the USA, so why was the request in US$? So far so obvious. PayPal were helping me out, right? I logged into my PayPal account (password, 6-digit code texted to my registered mobile).

On my dashboard there were four identical requests from the guy. On each one I could click for details. So I clicked one and got a message from PayPal saying that this was a suspicious transaction and that if I wanted to stop it to ring this number (a UK freephone number). I rang the number and went through what sounded like the normal security questions.

He even sent me a six-digit security code for me to input. The guy had a very bad accent and it was not easy to tell what he was saying, I ended up having to spell my email address and the security question answers. After I had given him my email address and answered the two security questions that I had logged with PayPal, he started to ask which bank account, what credit card etc., I was starting to get suspicious at this point and told him so. I immediately changed my password, changed the two security questions and then cancelled each of the four requests. I tried to raise the issue with PayPal but couldn’t find a way to do it. I tried to raise “a case” but PayPal said that they don’t do that on that type of transaction.

They no longer have a phone number to ring, or at least not one that I could find. Take note of this! During this cancellation process I noticed that the “note from PayPal” wasn’t from PayPal, it was a note from the bloke (PayPal facilitates that!) PayPal are covered because in small print it says note from,(the bloke).

The only good thing is that my credit card registered with PayPal was cancelled and replaced a year or so ago, on the advice of my bank due to another security concern. It looks like I caught it in time, but it depends upon how rapidly they were able to use the information they got from me.

#2

The sharks are out there. One of my biggest worries was that my elderly parents would become victims. Our family members eventually took interventions to secure those vulnerable matters.

Thread starter #3

The sharks are out there. One of my biggest worries was that my elderly parents would become victims. Our family members eventually took interventions to secure those vulnerable matters. My Mum developed Alzheimer’s and fortunately we saw it coming in time to get the two Lasting Power of Attorney agreements (Health & Welfare and Finance & Property), known as LPA’s.

When the time came, we were able to close her credit card accounts and remove her debit cards from her. We contacted the bank to make sure that they didn’t send her any replacements automatically, or even a cheque book! She could quite happily chat to potential scammers and be safe from financial harm.

The LPA’s are the product of the British Government and having set them up for my mother and used them, I can wholeheartedly give a gold star for clarity to whoever designed the website. I also can recommend that if you have elderly parents, even if they are fully alert, then set up the LPAs.

  • You will not be able to set them up once they have “gone” as there are third party tests to complete.
  • Once that happens you will have to go to the Office of the Public Guardian (OPG) – and that is a paperwork and legal nightmare! My mate told me what happened to him and he’s a very clever guy.
  • His Mother and older sister refused to get LPA’s and he had to go the OPG route.

I was so impressed with the LPA’s and the protection they provide that once I had got them for my mother, I set them up for me and my wife so that if we went gaga (age or accident), then they would be saved from the OPG route (which I repeat would be a long-lasting arse-ache for my daughters for the rest of my life and/or my wife’s.

#4

Apart from cancelling my PayPal account, not sure what else I can do. Any suggestions? You said you already changed your password. That’s good, as long as it’s unique to that account, and comprised of at least a dozen random characters, including capitals, numbers, and symbols.

It also sounds like you’re using two-factor authentication. Good. Now check your history to confirm you haven’t made any PayPal payments. None? All good. Remember back in the 1980’s, how you were told not to have anonymous unprotected sex at the gay bathhouse? How you shouldn’t exchange needles with other intravenous drug users? It’s the same thing today.

There are dangers lurking, but if you are sensible and abide by the commonly accepted rules, you can mitigate the risk. Long before people were being duped on the interwebs, people were losing their money by mailing checks for products advertised in the backs of magazines, falling for the slick pitches of phone solicitors, and even forking over cash to hucksters traveling town-to-town in horse drawn wagons.

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#6

Hi Steve, Do you use your phone or a Personal computer to connect to paypal? Hope you’ll have chance and a good issue. Have a NIce Day. Thierry

Thread starter #7

I had a similar scam email yesterday saying that I’d had a request for a significant payment for Argos vouchers, Checking the app showed that there were no messages generated by PayPal.that being the case I just deleted the email, Absolute bunch of wankers.and I wish in some way there was a way to hurt them,because someone somewhere is bound to fall for this, Also @ThierryGTLTS I don’t use the PayPal app. I used my laptop. On that I can see who the email is from very easily. Once I saw they were all from PayPal, I logged in. But that was what the scammer was hoping for! I thought I was doing everything correctly.

I suppose I was, it’s just that my suspicion relaxed a bit once I knew I was on the proper PayPal website. If the scammer guy on the phone hadn’t had the exact same accent as all the other scam phone calls of the “there is something wrong with your computer.” type, then I might not have got as suspicious as quickly as I did.

Beware! You are not even safe on the proper security protected PayPal website!

Thread starter #9

I see that this thread has been moved to the Lounge instead of the General Forum. I will look out for that in future. Not sure I even knew it existed; I just go for What’s New.

#10

I see that this thread has been moved to the Lounge instead of the General Forum. I will look out for that in future. Not sure I even knew it existed; I just go for What’s New. Probably a good place for this. But I just removed my credit card from PayPal and found a very low monthly payment. I’ll figure that out later because I’ve no idea what it’s for.??

Thread starter #11

Probably a good place for this. But I just removed my credit card from PayPal and found a very low monthly payment. I’ll figure that out later because I’ve no idea what it’s for.?? It is low so that you don’t notice, but multiply that by thousands, tens of thousands or even millions of accounts and soon you’re talking real money.

Thread starter #12

13th Dec’22. Yet another attempt to defraud me via PayPal. I’m out! At 11:10, I closed my account and asked PayPal to delete all my data. Confirmed by 6-digit code. Then I got an email from PayPal saying that they are working on it and it may take 30 days to confirm the status.

  • 30 days!) It would appear that there is time yet for more attempts to defraud me.
  • What irritates me is that I could find no sure way to inform PayPal what was happening, could find no way to get advice from them, their FAQs were no FN use.
  • The process of closing my account allowed me the opportunity to give feedback, which I used.

Maybe they will pay attention now? But I doubt it. Last edited: Dec 13, 2022

#13

Any chance removing your bank account data from paypal or to withdraw authorization of paypal to debit your bank accounts?

#14

13th Dec’22. Yet another attempt to defraud me via PayPal. Is someone sending you a payment request any different than the requests I get daily? I have emails offering HotRussianBabes, Free Energy, Male Enhancement, new storm windows, and squirting. On Facebook, chicks with their boobs hanging out all want to be my friend.

Thread starter #15

Any chance removing your bank account data from paypal or to withdraw authorization of paypal to debit your bank accounts? Thanks for the idea, I didn’t believe that was possible. But doesn’t it undermine the whole concept? Anyway, it’s gone now, they confirmed the account was deleted this morning.

Thread starter #16

As @Arminius says, you should be able to put a block on your account to that provider with your on-line banking. That’s like with the funny glowing magical box thing where you’re reading this Alternatively, if you send me all your bank details, I can do it for you. What pissed me off to be honest, was that PayPal was facilitating this. In addition, I could not find any way to get PayPal to pay attention. All, I could do was to open each attempt and then cancel it. A few days later, PayPal emailed me to say that the request had been cancelled.

Thread starter #17

Is someone sending you a payment request any different than the requests I get daily? I have emails offering HotRussianBabes, Free Energy, Male Enhancement, new storm windows, and squirting. On Facebook, chicks with their boobs hanging out all want to be my friend.

  • For these 21st Century annoyances, I filter, delete, and block.
  • Every day the mail man delivers advertisements intended to rid me of my hard-earned cash.
  • Even my own bank and financial companies send me junk.
  • Cancelling my accounts and burying all my money in the back yard never really occurred to me.
  • I can totally understand your view.

Anything that turns up on my laptop I can block and send into oblivion. Anything that turns up on my phone ditto. And I never accept any cookies other than the essential ones and occasionally the performance ones. I also use an Ad Blocker which gets rid of the vast majority of ads for me.

But these messages were from PayPal and I didn’t want to block PayPal (not initially). What I thought worthy of making a thread was that the scam message was in what I thought was a safe place. I was on the PayPal website and had gone through all the usual security checks. Now I see with new eyes, the message to ring this number was marked “from (the scammer)” and not from PayPal.

I believe that I am as aware as the next guy about scams and cons etc, but I missed that one. I came close to giving away the farm. The same evening of my first experience with the PayPal scam, there was a guy on the news who had fallen for the PayPal scam and got relieved of a lot of money.

  1. His job was with computers and web stuff and he was deeply embarrassed.
  2. I guess he was just too confident in his own abilities.
  3. The extra irritation for me was not being able to much that felt active and final.
  4. I couldn’t tell PayPal and I couldn’t delete the message.
  5. All I could do was to cancel the scammer’s request.

Several days later the requests were still there cluttering up my account. Then some more arrived.

#18

Just closed my PayPal account and I did the security “dance”. There was one monthly payment of $1.44 that was not identified by PayPal. Like Steve said; it’s small enough that you don’t really notice. In the past 5 years I’ve only used PayPal 3 times (I think) to purchase items.

  1. I never had a problem with this purchase/delivery method.
  2. But using my credit card seems a little safer, even though it’s not completely safe.
  3. On my iPhone I’ve been using “Wallet” for local purchases.
  4. It shows my purchases immediately.
  5. And recently my bank has requested that I update my info.
  6. Why? The request seems vague and unnecessary.

I’ve been using this bank for 35+ years. Additional security maybe?

#19

I had similar in the UK, Lynn Dunkr “lynn dunkr sent you a money request

Fraudulent Activity Found In Your Account, Amount £649.99 GBP Has Been Debited From Your Account For A Purchase Of DECATHLON GIFT CARDS, If It’s Not You Reach Us Immediately @ +44-800-368-6158″​

I contacted PayPal – apparently any PayPal member can request money from another user, to request – they don’t need your password. It’s just a request for payment, you can refuse it and Paypal reassured me that they won’t pay until I click to tell them to do so.

  1. I clicked and now it still sows but as cancelled so I can’t click it by mistake The conversation: me: Hi.
  2. I received what appeared to be a fraudulent email asking me to pay £649.99.
  3. I never heard of the requester.
  4. I looked at my PayPal account and this payment request is actually there in my pending section.

Please tell me what to do and please look into why a PayPal account holder is able to attempt fraud on my account like this. Paypal: ” Hi My name is Sowmya, thank you for contacting PayPal Messaging! I see that you are concerned regarding the payment request received.

  • Firstly I would like to thank you for highlighting this with us.
  • I would request you to please forward the payment request email to,
  • Not to worry, be assured that there will be no funds debited automatically from your account for the invoice/payment request,
  • And – Please note that any PayPal user can send invoice request to anyone.

As we have received same complaint from several customers we are reporting every case to our investigation team and post their review they will take necessary action. I request your understanding in this matter.”

#21

I had similar in the UK, Lynn Dunkr “lynn dunkr sent you a money request

Fraudulent Activity Found In Your Account, Amount £649.99 GBP Has Been Debited From Your Account For A Purchase Of DECATHLON GIFT CARDS, If It’s Not You Reach Us Immediately @ +44-800-368-6158″​

I contacted PayPal – apparently any PayPal member can request money from another user, to request – they don’t need your password. It’s just a request for payment, you can refuse it and Paypal reassured me that they won’t pay until I click to tell them to do so.

I clicked and now it still sows but as cancelled so I can’t click it by mistake The conversation: me: Hi. I received what appeared to be a fraudulent email asking me to pay £649.99. I never heard of the requester. I looked at my PayPal account and this payment request is actually there in my pending section.

Please tell me what to do and please look into why a PayPal account holder is able to attempt fraud on my account like this. Paypal: ” Hi My name is Sowmya, thank you for contacting PayPal Messaging! I see that you are concerned regarding the payment request received.

Firstly I would like to thank you for highlighting this with us. I would request you to please forward the payment request email to, Not to worry, be assured that there will be no funds debited automatically from your account for the invoice/payment request, -and – Please note that any PayPal user can send invoice request to anyone.

As we have received same complaint from several customers we are reporting every case to our investigation team and post their review they will take necessary action. I request your understanding in this matter.” Well that response raises my temperature a bit.

#22

Sadly I don’t suppose there’s any way they can stop a PayPal member making a payment request – scary thing is that I do use PayPal at Decathlon. Maybe it’s just a coincidence. Only thing PayPal can do, I imagine, is ban people who make these incorrect requests from the platform

#23

Same happened to me 15th Nov. as I was travelling. The fake number is +44-800-260-5954. It looks absolutely genuine until, as the OP did, you chat to the “helpdesk guy” and he starts to ask for credit card number plus the CVV. be warned it sound genuine as they reel off your last 3 to 4 Paypal transactions somehow not just the fake ones they hook you with.

#24

I closed my PayPal account after: ** they refused to help me when I gave them all proof the article was not as described ** they reinstated this totalitarian fascist move, in a hidden way

Thread starter #25

Sadly I don’t suppose there’s any way they can stop a PayPal member making a payment request – scary thing is that I do use PayPal at Decathlon. Maybe it’s just a coincidence. Only thing PayPal can do, I imagine, is ban people who make these incorrect requests from the platform Or ban contact details inside the note and automatically delete all requests that contain contact details.

Thread starter #26

, I was lucky in that I didn’t get hit. The same day my son did and is £13,000 down as his bank let through 13 £1,000 transactions within 10 mins. Yikes!