Asked By: Rodrigo Allen Date: created: Jan 23 2023

Is Who Framed Roger Rabbit censored on Disney plus

Answered By: Christopher Cooper Date: created: Jan 23 2023

A WHOLE lot has been edited from the original run of ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit?’ For starters, Baby Herman raising his middle finger has been removed. And, by this, we mean it was digitally painted over. Remember animated icon Betty Boop and her revealing dress slip over at The Ink and Paint Club?

Is Who Censored Roger Rabbit for kids?

Parents Need to Know – Parents need to know that some of the nuances of Who Framed Roger Rabbit ‘s storyline – and much of the film’s innuendo-laden humor – will go right over children’s head. Several scenes feature cartoon violence, including one in which characters are thrown into “the dip” (an acid-like concoction that will “erase” toons). A live-action character is shot on screen (no blood), and someone is run over by a steamroller. Adult language used by the live-action characters includes “son of a bitch” and “bastard,” and silly double entendres proliferate (“I’m not bad, I’m just drawn that way”). Jessica Rabbit is highly sexualized. To stay in the loop on more movies like this, you can sign up for weekly Family Movie Night emails,

Asked By: Robert Mitchell Date: created: Jun 19 2023

Who Censored Roger Rabbit centipede press

Answered By: Samuel Powell Date: created: Jun 19 2023

Who Censored Roger Rabbit? synopsis “Who’d want to kill a dumb cartoon bunny?” That’s what Eddie Valiant wants to know. Eddie’s the toughest private eye in Los Angeles. He’ll handle any case for any client — if you’re human. If you’re a Toon, not so much.

Eddie hates Toons. He hates the way they constantly goof around, never take anything seriously. He especially hates the way they talk using word-balloons because they think that’s funny. One day, when Eddie’s bank balance dwindles down to zilch, Eddie reluctantly agrees to help Roger Rabbit, a Toon who plays straight man (or should that be straight rabbit) in the Baby Herman cartoon series.

Roger wants Eddie to find out who’s been trying to buy the funny bunny’s contract from the DeGreasy Brothers cartoon syndicate. When somebody murders Rocco DeGreasy, Roger becomes the prime suspect! Then, oh oh, somebody kills Roger too! Who censored Roger Rabbit? Who shot Rocco DeGreasy? Was it Roger? Or maybe Roger’s hot-cha-cha wifey-poo, Jessica Rabbit? Why had Jessica — a pretty steamy number for a Toon — ever married this dopey bunny in the first place? Why does Roger keep popping up in Eddie’s case even after the rabbit’s dead? As Eddie combs L.A.

From the DeGreasy Brothers executive suites to Sid Sleaze’s porno comic studio, he uncovers art thefts, blackmail plotsand the cagiest killer he’s ever faced. In Who Censored Roger Rabbit?, author Gary K. Wolf created a wonderfully skewed — and totally believable — world made up of equal parts Raymond Chandler, Lewis Carroll, and Looney Tunes.

This cult classic and highly praised book kick-started the whole resurgence of movie animation. Wolf’s novel became the basis for the blockbuster Walt Disney/Steven Spielberg Academy Award winning film Who Framed Roger Rabbit. Be prepared, folks. This is the nitty gritty, witty, and not so pretty original Toontown, the one that exists only in the slightly twisted mind of the author who created the place.

  • In this new, lavish limited edition you’ll see for the first time images of Wolf’s characters as he first conceived and described them.
  • Fast action and plenty of laughs pack this riotously surreal ground breaking, spoof of the hard-boiled detective novel.
  • From first page to last, Who Censored Roger Rabbit? is shear delight.

This new edition presents the novel with a new introduction by Gary K. Wolf and new artwork by Wayne Anderson. It is signed by both Wolf and Anderson and limited to just 300 copies. : Who Censored Roger Rabbit?

Asked By: Dylan Parker Date: created: Aug 01 2023

Who Censored Roger Rabbit blonde girl

Answered By: Harry Taylor Date: created: Aug 03 2023

Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988) – Laura Frances as Blonde Starlet – IMDb.

Was Jessica Rabbit a bad guy?

This hero was proposed but rejected by the community for not being admirable enough or lacks what is necessary to be a purely good hero. Therefore, this hero shall be added to our “Never Again List”, where proposed heroes rejected by the community shall be placed to prevent future proposals of the same do-gooder. They can be proposed again (with the permission of an administrator ) if new elements appear in their series that can change their status as non-PG heroes. Any act of adding this hero to the Pure Good category without a proposal or creating a proposal for this hero without the permission of an administrator will result in a ban. Additional Notice : This template is meant for admin maintenance only. Users who misuse the template will be blocked for a week minimum.

table>

” I’m not bad, I’m just drawn that way. „ ~ Jessica Rabbit.

Jessica Rabbit is the tritagonist of the 1988 film Who Framed Roger Rabbit, In the book, she was an amoral, up-and-coming star and former comic character, over whom her estranged husband, comic strip star Roger Rabbit, obsessed. She is re-imagined in the film as a sultry, but moral cartoon singer at a Los Angeles supper club called the “Ink and Paint Club”.

Why is Roger Rabbit controversial?

Controversy – With the film’s Laserdisc release, Variety first reported in March 1994 that observers uncovered several scenes of subliminal antics from the animators that featured brief nudity of the Jessica Rabbit character. While undetectable when played at the usual rate of 24 film frames per second, the Laserdisc player allowed the viewer to advance frame-by-frame to uncover these visuals.

  • Many retailers said that within minutes of the Laserdisc debut, their entire inventory was sold out.
  • The run was fueled by media reports about the controversy, including stories on CNN and various newspapers.
  • A Disney exec responded to Variety that “people need to get a life than to notice stuff like that.

We were never aware of its cock, it was just a stupid gimmick the animators pulled on us and we didn’t notice it. At the same time, people also need to develop a sense of humor with these things.” One scene involves Herman extending his middle finger as he passes under a woman’s dress and reemerging with drool on his lip.

Other rumors also exist. Gary K. Wolf, author of the novel Who Censored Roger Rabbit?, filed a lawsuit in 2001 against The Walt Disney Company. Wolf claimed he was owed royalties based on the value of “gross receipts” and merchandising sales. In 2002, the trial court in the case ruled that these only referred to actual cash receipts Disney collected and denied Wolf’s claim.

In its January 2004 ruling, the California Court of Appeal disagreed, finding that expert testimony introduced by Wolf regarding the customary use of “gross receipts” in the entertainment business could support a broader reading of the term. The ruling vacated the trial court’s order in favor of Disney and remanded the case for further proceedings.

Is Who Censored Roger Rabbit worth reading?

1,219 reviews 8,987 followers July 17, 2020 I may have what some might consider and interesting opinion on this one. It is always hard when reading a book that a movie you love and have seen a dozen times in the past 30 years is based on. Normally I think I would go in with a lot of pre-conceived notions and be completely unhappy with the result when I come out the other side.

But, in this case, I am happy with the book, but only because it was easy for me to separate it from the movie. How you ask? I am not 100% sure, but I can say that while the essence and certain key lines (“I’m not bad, I’m just drawn that way”) are still there, it felt completely different – enough so that I was able to enjoy it as a new story.

Perhaps almost sequel-ish. The book is darker and raunchier with some sex and violence a bit more extreme than the movie. But, it was still funny and the relationship between Valiant, Roger, and Jessica was entertaining to follow. Since many of you are probably familiar with the movie, you probably know that this is a satire take on the hard-boiled genre.

  • I think that anyone who enjoys that genre will find a lot to enjoy here.
  • It contains many of my favorite hard-boiled tropes – especially all of the crazy comparisons made by the main character (i.e.
  • In one scene a character is trying to get coffee and snacks out of vending machines by punching and shaking them.

He gets coffee, but the snack machine will not give in to the pressure – Valiant says that the snack machine “must have had a stronger Union than the coffee machine” I LOLed! 🤣🤣🤣) All in all a fun book. Will you like it if you liked the movie? Maybe.

2020 audio humor

40 reviews 7 followers February 19, 2012 Growing up, I absolutely loved the movie Who Framed Roger Rabbit. I’ve been told many times that my brother and I killed the VHS copy we had from watching it so much, and so we kept having to catch it on the Disney Channel free preview weekends when funds were too tight to buy a new copy.

  1. Eventually I grew up, got a job, and for a small window of a couple years, had disposable income due to not having any financial obligations of my own.
  2. So I bought a copy on DVD.
  3. That’s when I finally noticed on the end credits that it was based upon a book I had never ever heard about.
  4. When I eventually found a copy of the book, the story I read only had fleeting similarities beyond the names and occupations of the main characters.

In fact, the book was given a thorough “child-friendly” veneer in its screen treatment, and despite the success of this effort, it still maintained it’s appeal to adults. If they’d been more true to the book, it would have lost out on its cross generation appeal.

loved-movie-also own

795 reviews 350 followers April 8, 2020 “I’m not bad, Mr. Valiant. I’m just drawn that way.” Woah this was veeeery different from the movie! And, I should add, definitely worse. The story is completely different, the character’s personalities are almost opposite, and in general it doesn’t work as smoothly as in the movie. But, overall, it wasn’t a bad book.

audiobooks

315 reviews 55 followers February 20, 2023 This ended up being an interesting read. Yes, it’s the book Who Framed Roger Rabbit? is based on, but unlike the current trend, the original book was the dark and gritty version. While a lot of the characters show up in both versions, the movie and the book have completely different plots.

  • There are some other differences between the book and movie worlds.
  • In the book, Toons mainly work in comics and not cartoons.
  • They speak with speech bubbles that float above their heads, probably explaining the comic thing.
  • In the book, Toons aren’t nearly indestructible, like in the movie; they can die as easily as humans.

The catch is that they can create limited time doppelgangers to serve as their stunt doubles like Loki in the MCU. Another big difference is that some humanoid toons like Jessica Rabbit are so realistic that they can almost pass as human. In universe conspiracy theories are centered around famous people really being toons.

  1. The book plays the story pretty straight, for the most part.
  2. It’s a hard-boiled detective story that just happens to take place in a world with Toons.
  3. I liked the mystery, but I wasn’t a huge fan of the very ending.
  4. I was floating between 3 and 4 stars, and the ending settled it for me.
  5. I still think it’s worth a read if you’re a hard-boiled mystery fan or liked the movie.

Being familiar with one won’t ruin the other. There are more Roger Rabbit books, but it sounds like they’re a direct sequel to the movie and retcon this book. Sounds like I’ll probably skip them.

books-to-screen fantasy mystery

2,002 reviews 72 followers November 4, 2017 This book is so amazing. The ending was not what I expected it to be. It kept me guessing till the very last page. This is one of my new favorite books!

fantasy mystery

554 reviews 58 followers May 22, 2020 This is the spoiler free review of Who Censored Roger Rabbit, the spoiler full review that gets into all the gritty details can be found at https://amanjareads.com/2020/05/20/wh. If you are anywhere near my age bracket you’ve very likely seen the movie Who Framed Roger Rabbit.

You probably had a very confusing crush on Jessica Rabbit. Just admit it, I know I did. But you probably didn’t know that the movie was based on a series of noir thriller novels by Gary K. Wolf. I know I didn’t. I recently rewatched the movie and it absolutely holds up. The animation is still breathtaking and the acting is superb.

Seriously, add this to your short list of movies to watch again. But while watching the credits for the movie I saw that ever so telling “based on the novel” caption and couldn’t believe my eyes. This movie, about cartoons living among the humans was a novel?! How.

how does that even work? I had to find out, I bought the kindle edition of the first of the four novels immediately. And let me tell you, this is an impressive piece of fiction. It strongly veers from the plot of the movie, at least this first book does. Hopefully I’ll be able to get the other books soon and see if there are more similar plot elements but this first one is definitely different.

Jessica Rabbit is still in it and still (kind of) married to Roger. She’s described exactly as she looks in the movie. The book does an incredible job of describing the toons. The crazy way they look as well as their inhuman actions and speech bubbles. The speech bubbles even interact in three dimensional space! The plot stands on it’s own for this first book.

It’s not the same as the movie and it has an actual conclusion so the sequels can be assumed to also be stand-alones. It is also far more adult than the movie is. This is truly a hard-boiled action noir thriller that includes violence, sex, and other adult themes. The best part is that it’s just a well crafted mystery.

The reader gets to keep track of clues and follow the trail of the mystery to the surprise twist ending that actually works. There are just enough red herrings to keep the story from being obvious but not so many that you just feel manipulated by the end.

Above all else, it’s original. I’ve never read another book like it. It masterfully handles its bizarre concept and grounds it to be serious when it could easily become overly silly. I look forward to reading the others in the series at a future date and would love to hear from anyone else who has read them.

If you love mystery novels add this one to the top of your to read list. It will keep you engaged the entire time and the characters are definitely far from stereotypical or boring. 807 reviews 67 followers January 28, 2020 This is an incredibly well-done mystery with interesting twists, but that’s only part of the appeal: there are really creative fantasy elements (with phenomenal worldbuilding) that are used to comment on societal issues.

It plays with the typical tropes of detective stories and is also really funny. The idea of a world inhabited by cartoon characters and humans is interesting and Gary Wolf really utilizes all of the possibilities: there are comments on racism throughout the book, however the description of how life would work in that situation doesn’t stop there.

Wolf had a lot of fun ideas besides the more serious aspects discussed (which never felt ham-fisted). The reader gets a fascinating look at the entertainment industry, filled with memorable characters. Sure, our protagonist is the stereotypical private detective, for good reason, but most people and toons in this are very much their own.

audiobook fantasy mystery

552 reviews 166 followers September 2, 2017 Good, not great. Dialogue-heavy and laden with lighthearted cliches. Zips along rapidly before losing itself in some gimmicky twists and turns to an oddball deus ex machina of an ending. One of those rare situations where the movie is better than the book-because they rewrote the whole plot, plus cartoon gags work better visually than in writing.3 stars out of 5. 204 reviews 2 followers June 24, 2013 Like probably just about any other person who has read this book since 1988, I decided to read this book due to my love of the film. Well, the book is definitely not the film. It’s a more serious parody of the noir genre, complete with pulpy dialogue and shady characters.

I think the problem for me starts with those parody elements. None of them is done particularly well, they serve the purpose, but only to remind you that you’re reading a parody rather than a tried-and-true novel. The cartoonish elements are downplayed, somewhat associated with racism and classism, but never really addressed in such a way to get across a point.

The plot is windy and twisty, but never particularly engaging. The result is a book that felt, unfortunately, half-realized until it reached the silver screen, where it comes fully into its own. I’m glad I read the book, but would probably recommend to anyone that they skip it and watch the film instead, unless they are a die-hard fan of the story and wants to see where some of the superficial elements of the film came from. 1,197 reviews 54 followers July 30, 2017 Okay but far from great I didn’t realise when I reviewed on Amazon it would overtake my initial review on Goodreads. I’ll review again shortly. 242 reviews 40 followers September 14, 2016 3.5 Esta lectura fue inesperada y debo resaltar que he tenido que desterrar toda idea preconcebida de la película para abordar la historia pues. es totalmente diferente. La película de Disney me encantó, pero es una película de Disney, debe ser políticamente correcta y con mucha acción. 3,722 reviews 260 followers July 1, 2023 Who Framed Roger Rabbit is one of my favorite movies growing up and I didn’t realize it was based on a book until much more recently. I couldn’t help but compare Who Censored Roger Rabbit? ( Roger Rabbit by Gary K.

  • Wolf to the movie adaptation because it’s so much different.
  • Out of all of the changes one of the smaller ones that surprised me the most is that it’s set in the present for when it was released in 1981 instead of 1947 like in the adaptation.
  • I was also surprised that the toons are primarily in comics rather than in cartoons and that Roger is like 6 feet tall.

While the book is a solid read, I definitely prefer the adaptation and I definitely rewatched it shortly after I finished listening to the audiobook.

audiobook fantasy humor

1,960 reviews 61 followers October 11, 2019 First things first: This is nothing like the story of the movie. The general premise and the characters are all the same, but the plot, motivations, and even the characterization is different here. This might be general information by this point, though, considering every other review I’ve seen mentions something about it.

  1. The thing is, this book shouldn’t be skipped over because it’s not the same story as the movie.
  2. Instead of cartoons, we have comic book characters; instead of infidelity, Eddie is investigating a murder; and instead of the main conflict revolving around ToonTown, the plot revolves around a,
  3. Teakettle.

(Yes, you read that correctly.) There’s a lot of brilliance in this story, not the least of which is the idea that cartoon characters exist as real beings in the world. The plot moves along at a nice pace, and as I neared the end of the book, I was looking for spare moments to read another chapter.

  • I didn’t quite read at stoplights while driving, but I was tempted.
  • Wolf captures the characters of Roger and Eddie perfectly, and develops their relationship appropriately.
  • Again, it’s different from the movie, though there are some similarities, but by the end of the book, they’ve both changed due to their experience together.

It’s touching, and if the last paragraph doesn’t move you, you might want to contact a coroner. The story is hard-boiled, which was a lot of fun. The similes alone are enough to make deviled eggs, and they’re everywhere. Your tolerance of such things could affect how much you enjoy the story.

My only gripe with the story is its conclusion, which just, really? That’s it? I mean, it fits, in a weird sort of way, but it’s, really? That? (Sorry for being vague, but, really?) There are two more novels in this series, but they were written after the movie’s success, and honestly, I don’t see how either of them could be possible.

I might come back to them in a future moment of weakness (I get them a lot), but for now I don’t feel the need to read them immediately. I think I prefer the story of the movie over the book, but that could be because I watched the movie first. It could be because the ending was more satisfying, too, but hey, that’s not enough not to read this book.

2019 crime e-book

990 reviews 133 followers December 11, 2019 There’s a lot going on in this book which inspired one of my favourite movies, “Who Framed Roger Rabbit?” The story in the book is very different from the movie, so it really was only used for inspiration. It goes in many different directions at once.

fantasy historical-fiction humor

409 reviews 8 followers March 28, 2012 There are some films that you can’t help but think “*This* is why there is film. Here’s a movie that is so uniquely cinematic that it couldn’t ever work as a book.” Every time I watch “Who Framed Roger Rabbit” that pops into my mind.

The mixture of live-action and animated characters inhabiting the same world is so very. film. I was sure it could never work as a book. So, imagine my surprise when I discovered that, in fact, the movie was based on a book. Well, saying “based on” is a bit strong. call it “inspired by” instead. When I picked up the book, I honestly expected it to be one of the worst things I would read all year.

And while it might be, that will speak more to the outstanding quality of most of the rest of the things I’ve read, rather than to any failings of the book itself. It was actually a very enjoyable, if very weird, send-up of the hard-boiled detective. Gary K.

  • Wolf (whose name is every bit as cartoonish as Roger’s) clearly had a love for the genre, and played with the tropes well.
  • It’s a book that takes itself seriously in almost all the right places.
  • There are some aspects that don’t quite work-the last act, in particular, falls apart a little with the “solution” to the murder coming very much out of left field-but, for the most part, this is a mystery about double crosses and violence that takes itself seriously even as half the cast are comic strip characters talking through word balloons.

If you’re looking for the light-hearted, goofy fare of the movie, you’re in for a surprise. Roger and cast are a lot more grimy here, but it all sort of mostly works. Not everyone’s cup of tea, certainly, but worth a look if you’re a fan of the genre and looking for something very weird. 729 reviews 17 followers December 25, 2015 This book is completely different from the movie it inspired, the movie I’ve loved since I was a kid and have found layers to appreciate as an adult. It isn’t bad, it’s just wholly different. I’ve written in some reviews on here and in other places that in the past few years I’ve come to terms with the idea of adaptations.

Movies and books will never be perfectly similar because adaptations require each to play to the strengths of the medium in which it’s in. This, however, is much more than an adaptation. The movie took 80% of the same characters and the thinnest connection to the plot in here and then made its own thing.

And that’s good, because this book’s plot points are quite a bit too convoluted for a movie, especially a mass-market movie. Getting away from comparisons and to this book itself, it’s a nice homage to noir detective novels and the first person voice is pretty fun to read.

Detective Valiant’s sarcasm and world-weariness are a treat. The mystery is fun to solve and doesn’t seem to be poorly written – most of the difficulty in predicting it ahead of time has to do with unreliable witnesses. The world Wolf crafts is also an interesting one of toon/human segregation. There are some analogies to race-based segregation, but nothing that beats you over the head with a moral.

Wolf also creates a demented cast of characters to populate the world that make for a fun time as he interrogates them. Overall, it’s a fun read if you’re a fan of the noir detective genre and don’t expect it to hew too closely to the movie Who Framed Roger Rabbit.

You might be interested:  Who Are The New I'M A Celebrity Contestants?

basis-for-movie

3,642 reviews 47 followers Read April 3, 2023 One of my favorite memories was when my parents went out of town in 1988 and I went to one aunt’s house and my brother went to another. My aunt took me to see Who Framed Roger Rabbit? and we talked about it for years.

I’ve seen this movie at least two dozen times, I’ve played the absolutely terrible NES game, and now I’ve read the original book. This is not a novelization, but the book this was adapted from. So reading this novel made me realize who absolutely inspired that movie is. The book is.not great. It’s hugely inventive and some of the different conceits it creates are great.

The toons’ words come up in word clouds (like dialog in comics) and float and eventually collapse. The Roger Rabbit we spend most of our time with is an embodied persona, not the real toon. And what’s really good: the toons are comics, not cartoons, who enact scenes for a photographer to become the Sunday comics.

  1. So those are great, but the execution is pretty bad.
  2. The writing is tired, and boring, and the plot drags on with too many twists, and not in a good way.
  3. The movie really understood what needed to happen to make this book work on the screen.
  4. The biggest choice they make is to set it in the 1940s, as opposed to the novel’s contemporary setting, which is almost an anachronism.

The movie realizes that making it a spin off the old Hollywood tropes of post 1950s cinema makes so much more sense. January 20, 2011 You can’t compare the book with the Disney Film. This is no juvenile literature, no way. Toons live side-by-side with humans, all around the world. They are no cuddly stars, just there to provide entertainment to humans. They “love and hate and cry and laugh”, they struggle for their carreer, they have secrets to keep.

They kill. The whole atmosphere is darker. Eddie Valiant relies on cards to pay the rent, he’s a decent man and still a true alcohol lover. You won’t see a single character with no vices here. If you ask me, I tend to prefer the book. What with the scathing remarks in Eddie’s thoughts and the weirdness of the toons speaking in baloons, I can’t remind of a single boring chapter.

Tough with not much action, the story becomes more and more intriguing just to take a final unexpected twist. Which also happens to be the only flaw, in my opinion: as a matter of fact, I don’t like misteries dealing with totally unforeseeable events. Author 1 book 31 followers March 29, 2011 I originally read this shortly after the Disney film came out. As many have said, the only things the book and film have in common are a detective named Eddie Valiant and a Toon named Roger Rabbit, who is accused of killing a human.

Roger is married to Jessica Rabbit, a humanoid Toon knockout and he does work with Baby Herman. From there, the stories shake hands and go their separate ways. I remembered the book being good. Unfortunately, I had a cheap mass-market paperback that fell apart if you looked at it cross-eyed, and it’s taken me a long time to track down another copy (silly me, for not thinking of my Kindle sooner!).

I actually snagged it yesterday afternoon, sat down to read last night, and finished it before going to bed. I’d forgotten some of the characters so it was a pleasant rediscovery. Definitely worth reading again, and I’m sure I’ll come back to it from time to time.

2011-reads anthropomorphic fantasy

137 reviews June 14, 2023 “Who Framed Roger Rabbit” is one of my favorite Disney films and I was looking forward to reading the original source material. The book’s plot is very different than the film’s but I can see the elements that were used from the book for the 1988 film.

The hybrid world of humans and toons is fascinating and Roger is a more gritty character than his film adaptation. The story is told through Eddie Valiant’s perspective and it was so amusing to read. It felt like a stereotypical 1950s detective novel with offbeat similes and metaphors reminiscent of film noir.

If you are a fan of the film I highly recommended reading the book. There are also two sequels which interest me because I’m curious what elements from those books made it into the film. I discussed this book in comparison to the film on the podcast Dizney Coast to Coast available wherever you get your podcasts.

audio-book disney own

717 reviews 1,246 followers December 30, 2019 “Who Censored Roger Rabbit? (Roger Rabbit #1)” was the basis for the movie “Who Framed Roger Rabbit”, and although the book was published decades ago, it was only recently released as an audiobook. This is another book that was selected for a road trip with a car full of mixed sexualitiesi.e., not everyone enjoys lesbian romance or erotica (when oh when will they succumb to their true natures?) Anyway, the movie was more fun; this book is darker and both Roger and Jessica rabbit are jerks.3* 371 reviews 37 followers May 19, 2022 Ein sehr zufriedenstellendes Buch. 25 reviews July 28, 2022 In order to read this book you have to completely dissociate it from the movie. The concept is similar but characters, personalities, etc. vastly different. I also find mystery stories tend to have a slow build up which can be tough to power through. I do recommend this book because it is very well written and the story is still good. 229 reviews January 11, 2016 I’ve been intrigued by Who Censored Roger Rabbit? for years, ever since I heard that it was the basis for Who Framed Roger Rabbit a movie I love. For a while, I couldn’t find it anywhere, then, one day, it showed up at my local library.

I checked it out, read it.and was so, So, SO disappointed. Man, what a weird, uninteresting book. The plot-Eddie Valiant is hired by Roger Rabbit to find out what is going on with his contract. Roger wants to be in a solo comic strip, and the DeGreasy Brothers, his bosses, won’t let him, no matter how illogical it is to keep him.

His wife, Jessica Rabbit, is cheating on Roger with Rocco DeGreasy. The day after Eddie is hired, both Rocco and Roger are dead. Eddie is then drawn into the investigation of the double murders, while also getting caught up in a comic strip scandal, some affairs, and some odd adventure.

  • OK, some of the issues with this book are prevalent in the plot description.
  • First of all, Roger is a comic strip character.
  • In fact, Roger (and all the characters) actually talks in speech bubbles. OK.
  • The characters who are animated are in.comic book strips. Weird.
  • But, sadly, these aren’t the only problems with the book.

The book is set in the 1980’s, so cartoon characters are wearing jeans. Roger and Jessica are not only not in love, but are also incredibly unlikable. I did not care at all if these characters would get back together, Eddie is not that interesting. He has no girlfriend (who is an awesome character in the movie.

  1. Yay Delores!).
  2. And Eddie has no reason to hate ‘toons.
  3. The movie gave a good reason why Eddie hates toons, but here, he just hates ‘toons, but all humans in this book hate ‘toons.
  4. I think it’s supposed to be a racial allegory, (all humans hate ‘toons, ‘toons are treated as second class citizens) but it just feels so weird and so out of place in this book.

And my biggest problem with this book, something that made me bring this book down to one star is.cartoon characters can die from gunshot wounds. No, really, Roger Rabbit dies from being shot. Like, seriously? Has the author seen any of the Bugs Bunny/Daffy Duck “Rabbit Season/Duck Season” cartoons? Seriously, go watch Who Framed Roger Rabbit, NOPE

1-star

253 reviews 23 followers July 6, 2021 Winifred says: Yes, the movie (Who Framed Roger Rabbit) was inspired by a book. A hardboiled private detective named Eddie Valiant unexpectedly has one to two days at most to solve a murder. It is a classic Whodunit but for the sheer level of creative concepts, with imaginative twists and turns that keep you turning the pages for more.

  • If you thought the movie was creative, it’s no real surprise as it took the already-genius ideas of the book and dialed it up by 11.
  • There are still flaws (e.g., the characters are generally one layered; who you meet is mostly who you get throughout the story), but it has a unique take in a popular genre with good writing behind it.

Things to Consider: Even if you’ve seen the film, give the book a chance as the film is a VERY LOOSE adaptation with only some of the core concepts and character names being carried over. The book has a very big spoiler in the beginning (and other plot twists later), so tread carefully around it.

adult-fiction

310 reviews 31 followers May 2, 2017 Maybe its my love and nostalgia for the movie but I just couldn’t get into this. I could handle the corniness of comic cartoon characters, doppleganers and visible speach balloons but when the subject of SPOILER The homicidal teakettle Genie that’s when I lost all hope for this book. 4,385 reviews 405 followers November 28, 2020 Maybe not the best written book ever, but definitely a fun one. I knew the characters but never seen the movie, so the story was new for me and I highly enjoyed it. Liked that it was set very much in reality but had some odd bits thrown in to make it unique and so entertaining. Really want to see the movie now

Asked By: Samuel Price Date: created: Jan 06 2023

Did Disney censor Lilo and Stitch

Answered By: Wyatt Kelly Date: created: Jan 08 2023

Disney has taken some liberty with another one of their classic movies, but this one was done long ago. The version of Lilo & Stitch on Disney+ has been edited and fans aren’t too happy. This has come up a number of times on the streaming platform since it debuted in November 2019. Saludos Amigos was edited for the original DVD release to take out some smoking scenes.

  1. They were put back in for the Blu-ray release and then edited out again for Disney+, with some additional editing to go along with the no smoking.
  2. It appears that the version of Lilo and Stitch has been sourced from the second pressing of DVDs.
  3. In the theatrical version of Lilo and Stitch, the scene after Ving Rhames’ Cobra Bubbles (ex-CIA agent-turned-social worker), stops by to check on Lilo and Nani’s house.

He isn’t exactly pleased with the abode, which is mainly due to Lilo’s behavior, After he leaves, Nani gets angry with Lilo and chases her around the house until they get into the laundry room. In the original version of the movie, Lilo hops into a dryer to hide.

In the Disney+ version of Lilo and Stitch, Lilo does not hide in a dryer. Instead, the footage has been edited and she’s inside some kind of furniture, obscured by a pizza box. This was pointed out on social media and fans were not happy to see the change. However, it was done for good reason as it did not want children following in Lilo’s footsteps and trying to hide in a dryer, which could be potentially dangerous.

Plus, this change was made when Disney did a second pressing of the hit 2002 movie, although a lot of Disney fans on Tik Tok thought they were experiencing the Mandela Effect. It just looks weird that they don’t have a dryer in their laundry room any more.

Lilo and Stitch was made in 2001 and had to make some changes after the 9/11 attacks during production. Originally, Stitch, Nani, Jumba and Pleakley hijacked a jet and flew it through downtown Honolulu, but it was later changed into an alien spacecraft and instead of a downtown area with buildings, the background was changed to mountains.

While fans are mad about the recent changes to one of its classic movies, this one seems to be pretty harmless and not a huge change to the finished product. It’s far less intrusive than what was going to be shown pre-9/11. Disney+ also will not be showing Song of the South, though that is understandable.

  • Some fans wonder why questionable scenes in Dumbo and Pinocchio can remain with caution notes at the beginning, but projects like Saludos Amigos or Goofy smoking a cigarette cannot.
  • In the end, Disney runs a pretty tight ship and they don’t want anything on the streaming platform that one might easily find to be controversial.

As for Lilo and Stich, this isn’t a change that a whole lot of fans would have noticed had it not been pointed out. You can see the side by side images below, thanks to the Inside the Magic Twitter account.

Why does Disney plus remove scenes?

Under exceptional circumstances Disney+ will omit certain episodes from a TV series for a range of possible reasons such as ratings, rights availability, or other editorial decisions. If you have questions or comments about specific content missing from Disney+, please contact Disney+ Customer Service.

Asked By: Oscar Torres Date: created: Jan 25 2023

Does Disney still own Roger Rabbit

Answered By: Gregory Carter Date: created: Jan 26 2023

Development – The character of Roger was created by author Gary K. Wolf, for his 1981 novel Who Censored Roger Rabbit? Wolf was watching Saturday morning cartoons as research for new book ideas, when he noticed cereal commercial mascots such as Tony the Tiger and the Trix Rabbit,

Wolf found it amusing that these commercials had real children interacting with cartoon characters casually and without question, and he decided to explore the concept in book form, eventually combining pulp fiction and true crime elements, and eventually creating the character of Roger Rabbit in the process.

Published in 1981, Walt Disney Productions purchased the film rights that same year for $35,000. Wolf retains all story rights related to the characters and is allowed to write new novels featuring them, but Disney and Amblin Entertainment own the intellectual property rights.

  1. Before Richard Williams came on board for the film project, early animation tests for Roger gave him a simple and stylized look of a skinny white bunny with a purple nose.
  2. In these test animations, Roger was voiced by Paul Reubens,
  3. Subscribers to The Disney Channel (which was a subscription channel back in its early years) were able to see this test footage in the early 1980s.

When the film went into full production, Roger was redesigned in a fashion to take elements from all the major cartoon studios of the period, the philosophy behind the new characters, in general, being a combination of Disney’s elaborate animation style, similar characterization to Warner Bros.

Did they get rid of Roger Rabbit?

Welcome back to Toontown, Disneyland -goers! Toontown As of today, Toontown is officially back open in Disneyland, but we got in early to check it out yesterday ! However, this also means that a popular ride is finally back open too — Roger Rabbit’s Car Toon Spin! This ride closed with the Toontown refurbishment in 2022, and now you can finally ride it again! Roger Rabbit’s Car Toon Spin 2021 When we checked earlier today, the ride was sitting at around a 45-minute wait, ©Disney This means that there are now three rides in Toontown — Roger Rabbit’s Car Toon Spin, Mickey & Minnie’s Runaway Railway, and Chip ‘n’ Dale’s GADGETcoaster, which has also reopened. Hey there, Pete! Don’t forget that you can now meet some of your favorite characters again in Toontown, and don’t miss the new eats in the park as well! As always, be sure to stay tuned to AllEars for all the latest Disney news.

Asked By: Juan Watson Date: created: Aug 13 2023

Is Roger Rabbit the son of Bugs Bunny

Answered By: Isaiah Jones Date: created: Aug 16 2023

Who Framed Roger Rabbit: A Parody-Noir For The Ages Crafted as a hybrid of live-action and traditional animation, Robert Zemeckis’ noir parody Who Framed Roger Rabbit is set in a fictional 1947 Hollywood, with Toontown (where all the toons live) as one of its districts.

The late great Bob Hoskins — who, judging from the making-of featurettes, had to do most of his talking to rubber puppets, robotic contraptions and thin air — kills it as Eddie Valiant, an alcoholic cynical and toon-hating private detective who’s out to investigate the murder of an industry bigwig — the owner of Acme Industries, whose biggest customer happens to be someone named Wile.E.

Coyote. And Valiant had previously caught the guy in a rather “incriminating” position with the film’s femme fatale, Jessica Rabbit (voiced by Kathleen Turner), who also happens to be the wife of the titular rabbit (voiced by Charles Fleischer). Joining him in the investigation is Roger Rabbit himself (who’s been framed for the murder) so that he can have his name cleared and his wife back.

  1. The film also stars Christopher Lloyd as the cartoony over-the-top villain Judge Doom who’s out for Roger’s blood (if there’s such a thing), and Joanna Cassidy as Eddie’s waitress girlfriend Dolores who actively assists him in the investigation.
  2. In addition to the murder mystery, the film also has some kind of shady conspiracy going on in the background, which involves streetcars, another industry bigwig and Toontown itself.

I guess this film is the peak of Zemeckis’ creative and witty genius, which sadly has taken a turn for the worse post, He and his team of writers manage to lampoon all the relevant noir tropes without ever getting disrespectful of them, ably assisted by the totally game live-action and voice casts.

  1. However, it’s the film’s visual style, which employs seamless (for the time) fusion of live-action and cartoon, that emerges as the biggest star of the film.
  2. Sure, it looks a bit dated (especially the scenes which involve a lot of obvious bluescreening and wirework), but is still way better than even some recent blockbusters which feature painfully obvious CGI characters/settings.

The film also features numerous iconic cartoon characters from both Warner and Disney stables in cameo appearances (now an impossible feat) along with the ones created for the film. Speaking of the original animated characters, Roger Rabbit looks and acts like the long-lost son of Bugs Bunny (which he actually is, based on the plans for a sequel that never materialized).

And Jessica well, she is “not a bad girl, it’s just that she’s been drawn that way”, except for a few moments where she displays real horror, she always seems to find something erotic even in the gravest of situations. The other memorable ones include Judge Doom’s weasel squad, Benny the trustworthy yellow cab and last but not the least, Baby Herman, the 3-year-old co-star who in reality, happens to have the voice and libido of a 50-year-old.

Alan Silvestri’s dynamic score — ranging from faux-noir jazz all the way to the cymbal-banging loony tunes — perfectly accompanies the events in the film. The film was released during the 80s (1988 to be exact), a time when the name ‘Robert Zemeckis’ under the director’s credit of a film pretty much guaranteed a lot of fun for the family.

  • Who Framed Roger Rabbit too follows the same norm, albeit with quite a lot of risque moments and one-liners which frankly push — and even threaten to break apart — the boundaries of its PG rating.
  • And there’s the fact that the film starts with the “Touchstone Pictures” logo rather than the Walt Disney one, which alone should be one big clue that the film is not one among the kiddie flicks.

The film is currently streaming on Disney+ Hotstar, : Who Framed Roger Rabbit: A Parody-Noir For The Ages

Asked By: Morgan Martinez Date: created: Apr 12 2023

Did Who Framed Roger Rabbit use rotoscoping

Answered By: Matthew Reed Date: created: Apr 15 2023

The documentary The Number on Great-Grandpa’s Arm uses a blend of interviews, historical film footage, original artwork, and rotoscope animation. Rotoscope animation is named after the Rotoscope machine created by Max and Dave Fleischer in 1917. The machine allows film images to be projected frame by frame, letting animators trace those images to incorporate into their artwork.

Asked By: Aidan Cox Date: created: Jan 26 2023

Who turned down Who Framed Roger Rabbit

Answered By: Malcolm Foster Date: created: Jan 29 2023

Eddie Murphy turned down Who Framed Roger Rabbit | Movie News

  • Eddie Murphy “feels like an idiot” every time he sees ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit’ – after turning the film down.
  • The 58-year-old star rejected the chance to appear in the 1988 live action/ animated comedy movie – which featured Bob Hoskins as private detective Eddie Valiant who was tasked with exonerating cartoon character Roger Rabbit after he is accused of murder – because he wasn’t sure it would work to have real actors alongside animation.
  • He said: “The only movie I ever turned down that became a big hit was ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit’.

“I was gonna be the Bob Hoskins dude and I was like, ‘What? Animation and people? That sounds like bulls**t to me.’

  1. “Now every time I see it, I feel like an idiot.”
  2. Murphy also admitted he had to pass on an appearance in ‘Ghostbusters’ because he was committed to starring in ‘Beverly Hills Cop’.
  3. Speaking on ‘The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon’, he added: “It wasn’t like I turned it down.
  4. “I wasn’t available because I was doing this other movie.”
  5. Murphy recently confirmed he is to reprise his role as Prince Akeem in ‘Coming To America 2’, which is to drop next year, 32 years after the original motion picture.
  6. In the original, Eddie’s character travels to New York from a fictional African nation to escape an arranged marriage and find an American wife.
  7. Eddie recently said: “A lot of people have this expectation, like people would say to me when they found out I was doing it, ‘Don’t f**k that movie up.’

“So we’ve gone above and beyond what anybody would think. I’m really, really happy with it.” : Eddie Murphy turned down Who Framed Roger Rabbit | Movie News

Asked By: Nathan Phillips Date: created: Mar 15 2023

What kills cartoons in Who Framed Roger Rabbit

Answered By: Sebastian Taylor Date: created: Mar 15 2023

The Dip and demise comparison – Turpentine, acetone and benzene combine Judge Doom’s fictional ingredient that he refers to as “the Dip” that kills toons and which ultimately kills himself. In real life they are combination of paint thinners, Jenna Stoeber of Polygon felt that the Dip was a scary part of many childhoods She opined “the Dip is just paint thinner, able to instantly dissolve a painted Toon into nothingness.

For a child, that is a fundamental threat”. She added, “the horror of the Dip is uniquely adolescent, threatening to obliterate all of a child’s favorite creatures” and further described it for that reason as “pure terror”. Film director, Robert Zemeckis, compared Judge Doom’s invention of the Dip, that intended to eliminate all toons, to Adolf Hitler ‘s Final Solution,

According to film critic, Jonathan Rosenbaum, the filmmakers originally intended to name the Dip as the Final Solution. Judge Doom’s demise where he melts from the Dip is often referenced as an allusion to the death of the Wicked Witch of the West in The Wizard of Oz,

What does Jessica Rabbit symbolize?

Society often judges people by the manner of their dress, determining the sexual status of a person by their fashion and conventional attractiveness. There’s no greater example of this than Jessica Rabbit. “I’m not bad. I’m just drawn that way.” That’s Jessica’s iconic line from the movie Who Framed Roger Rabbit,

  1. She’s a sex symbol for many people – but this line tells us a lot about why she’s seen as canonically asexual.
  2. So why do some people struggle to accept this? For those who have never seen Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Jessica Rabbit is Roger Rabbit’s curvaceous wife, who draws the gaze of all the men in Toontown.

When Roger is implicated for murder, Jessica seeks evidence to exculpate her husband. Asked why she loves Roger, Jessica says it’s because Roger makes her laugh rather than any sort of physical attraction. This is a point of contention for some, who find it difficult to believe Jessica Rabbit is asexual due to her physical appearance. Whenever the subject of Jessica Rabbit being an asexual icon is brought up, a slew of comments emerges, saying she can’t be asexual due to being conventionally attractive. “Jessica Rabbit’s not asexual. Look at how she dresses!” “There’s no way Jessica Rabbit’s asexual. Yasmin Benoit is a lingerie model. When she does any modelling shoots for her profession or any sort of asexual activism, she receives a litany of comments disparaging her for daring to look attractive. This is because asexual people who are seen as a conventionally attractive challenge and confound the concept that appearing attractive means seeking sex. We as a society judge people based on their looks so often. If they look a certain way or dress a certain way, we make assumptions about their sexual behaviour – often negative ones. Jessica Rabbit being ace shows that sexuality is independent of appearance and that no matter how a person looks, their sexuality is all their own.

Asked By: Austin Henderson Date: created: Nov 04 2023

What is Jessica Rabbit famous line

Answered By: Adrian Griffin Date: created: Nov 06 2023

Jessica Rabbit : You don’t know how hard it is being a woman looking the way I do. Eddie Valiant : You don’t know how hard it is being a man looking at a woman looking the way you do. Jessica Rabbit : I’m not bad. I’m just drawn that way.

You might be interested:  Who Is Prince Harry'S Real Father?

Eddie Valiant : Hey, Judge. Doesn’t a dying rabbit deserve a last request? Roger Rabbit : Yeah, nose plugs would be nice. Eddie Valiant : I think you want a drink. So, how about it, Judge? Judge Doom : Well, why not? I don’t mind prolonging the execution. Eddie Valiant : Happy trails. Roger Rabbit : No thanks, Eddie. I’m trying to cut down. Eddie Valiant : Drink the drink. Roger Rabbit : But I don’t want the drink. Judge Doom : He doesn’t want the drink. Eddie Valiant : He does. Roger Rabbit : I don’t. Eddie Valiant : You do. Roger Rabbit : I don’t. Eddie Valiant : You do. Roger Rabbit : I don’t. Eddie Valiant : You do. Roger Rabbit : I don’t. Eddie Valiant : You don’t. Roger Rabbit : I do. Eddie Valiant : You don’t. Roger Rabbit : I do. Eddie Valiant : You don’t. Roger Rabbit : Listen, when I say I do, that means I do.

Eddie Valiant : You crazy rabbit! I’m out there risking my neck for you, and what are you doing? Singing and dancing! Roger Rabbit : But I’m a toon. Toons are supposed to make people laugh. Eddie Valiant : Sit down! Roger Rabbit : You don’t understand. Those people needed to laugh. Eddie Valiant : Then when they’re done laughing, they’ll call the cops. That guy Angelo would rat on you for a nickel. Roger Rabbit : Not Angelo. He’d never turn me in. Eddie Valiant : Why? Because you made him laugh? Roger Rabbit : That’s right! A laugh can be a very powerful thing. Why, sometimes in life, it’s the only weapon we have.

Roger Rabbit : Yeah. Check the probate. Why, my Uncle Thumper had a problem with HIS probate, and he had to take these big pills, and drink lots of water. Eddie Valiant : Not prostate, you idiot, PROBATE!

Dolores : Is that a rabbit in your pocket or are you just happy to see me?

Roger Rabbit : Okay, nobody move! All right, you weasels, grab some sky or I let the judge have it. You heard me, I said drop it! Jessica Rabbit : Roger, darling! Roger Rabbit : That’s right, my dear. I’d love to embrace you, but first, I have to satisfy my sense of moral outrage. Judge Doom : Put that gun down, you buck-toothed fool! Roger Rabbit : That’s it, Doom. Give me another excuse to pump you full of lead. So you thought you could get away with it, didn’t you? Ha! We toons may act idiotic, but we’re not stupid. We demand justice. Why, the real meaning of the word probably hits you like a ton of bricks. Jessica Rabbit : Roger! Roger, say something! Roger Rabbit : Look, stars! Ready when you are, Raoul.

Eddie Valiant : You mean you could’ve taken your hand out of that cuff at any time? Roger Rabbit : No, not at any time, only when it was funny.

Jessica Rabbit : C’mon Roger, let’s go home. I’ll bake you a carrot cake.

Eddie Valiant : Holy smoke, he’s a Toon! Judge Doom : Surprised? Eddie Valiant : Not really. That lame-brained freeway idea could only be cooked up by a Toon. Judge Doom : Not just ANY Toon. Judge Doom : Remember me, Eddie? When I killed your brother, I talked. just. like. THIS!

Eddie Valiant : Anybody know you’re here? Roger Rabbit : Nobody. Not a soul, except, uh. Eddie Valiant : Who? Roger Rabbit : Well, you see, I didn’t know where your office was. So I asked the newsboy. He didn’t know. So I asked the fireman, the green grocerer, the butcher, the baker, they didn’t know! But the liquor store guy. he knew. Eddie Valiant : In other words, the whole damn town knows you’re here! Get out!

Eddie Valiant : I’m through with taking falls / And bouncing off the walls / Without that gun, I’d have some fun / I’d kick you in the. Roger Rabbit : Nose! Smart Ass : Nose? That don’t rhyme with “walls.” Eddie Valiant : No, but this does.

Bugs Bunny : Eh, what’s up, Doc? Jumpin’ without a parachute? Kinda dangerous, ain’t it? Eddie Valiant : Yeah. Mickey Mouse : Yeah. You could get killed. Ha-ha, ha-ha. Eddie Valiant : You guys got a spare? Mickey Mouse : Uh, Bugs does. Eddie Valiant : Yeah? Bugs Bunny : Yeah, but I don’t think you want it. Eddie Valiant : I do, I do, give it to me! Mickey Mouse : Gee, uh, better let him have it, Bugs. Bugs Bunny : Okay, Doc, whatever you say, here’s the spare. Eddie Valiant : Thank you. Eddie Valiant : Thank you. Eddie Valiant : Aw, no! AAAAAAAAAHHHHHH! Mickey Mouse : Aw, poor fella. Ha ha. Bugs Bunny : Yeah, ain’t I a stinker? Lena Hyena : My man! Lena Hyena : Come to Lena! Eddie Valiant : Toons. Gets ’em every time.

Mrs. Herman : Mommy’s going to the beauty parlor, darling, but I’m leaving you with your favorite friend, Roger. He’s going to take very, very good care of you, because if he doesn’t. HE’S GOING BACK TO THE SCIENCE LAB.

Roger Rabbit : What could have possibly happen to you to turn you into such a sourpuss? Eddie Valiant : You really want to know? I’ll tell you. A toon killed my brother. Roger Rabbit : A toon? No! Eddie Valiant : Yes, a toon. We were investigating a robbery at the First National Bank of Toontown. Back in those days, me and Teddy liked working Toontown, thought it was a lot of laughs. Anyway, this guy got away with a zillion simoleons. We trailed him to a little dive down on Yukster Street. We went in. Only he got the drop on us, literally. Dropped a piano on us from fifteen stories. Broke my arm, Teddy never made it. I never did find out who that guy was. All I remember was him standing over me laughing, with those burning red eyes, and that high, squeaky voice. He disappeared into Toontown after that.

Roger Rabbit : P-p-please, Eddie! Don’t throw me out. Don’t you realize you’re making a big mistake? I didn’t kill anybody. I swear! The whole thing’s a set up. A scam, a frame job. Ow! Eddie, I could never hurt anybody. Oow! My whole purpose in life is to make. people. laugh!

Jessica Rabbit : Roger, darling. I want you to know I love you. I’ve loved you more than any woman’s ever loved a rabbit.

Judge Doom : Can you guess what this is? Jessica Rabbit : Oh my God, it’s DIP! Judge Doom : That’s right, my dear! Enough to dip Toontown off the face of the earth! Judge Doom : Vehicle of my own design; 5,000 gallons of heated dip, pumped at enormous velocity through a pressurized water cannon. Toontown will be erased in a matter of minutes.

Dolores : Is he always this funny, or only on days when he’s wanted for murder?

Judge Doom : A few weeks ago I had the good providence to stumble upon a plan of the city council. A construction plan of epic proportions. We’re calling it a freeway. Eddie Valiant : Freeway? What the hell’s a freeway? Judge Doom : Eight lanes of shimmering cement running from here to Pasadena. Smooth, safe, fast. Traffic jams will be a thing of the past.

Eddie Valiant : So that’s why you killed Acme and Maroon? For this freeway? I don’t get it. Judge Doom : Of course not. You lack vision, but I see a place where people get on and off the freeway. On and off, off and on all day, all night. Soon, where Toontown once stood will be a string of gas stations, inexpensive motels, restaurants that serve rapidly prepared food. Tire salons, automobile dealerships and wonderful, wonderful billboards reaching as far as the eye can see. My God, it’ll be beautiful.

Eddie Valiant : Dolores, you need to find yourself a good man. Dolores : But I already have a good man. Roger Rabbit : P-p-please, don’t mind me.

Eddie Valiant : A ladies’ man, eh? Baby Herman : The problem is I got a fifty year old lust and a three year old dinky. Eddie Valiant : Yeah. Must be tough. Baby Herman : Look, Valiant, the rabbit didn’t kill Acme. He’s not a murderer, I should know, he’s a dear friend of mine. I tell ya Valiant, the whole thing stinks like yesterday’s diapers. Look at this. The papers said Acme left no will. Baby Herman : That’s a load of succotash. Any toon knows Acme had a will. He promised to leave Toontown to us toons. That will is the real reason he got bumped off. Eddie Valiant : Has anybody ever seen this will? Baby Herman : Ah, no. But he gave us his solemn oath. Eddie Valiant : If you think that guy could do anything solemn, the gag’s on you, pal. Baby Herman : I just thought that since you were the one who got my pal in trouble, you might wanna help get him out. I can pay ya. Eddie Valiant : Save your money for a pair of elevator shoes! Baby Herman : Hey hey hay, Valiant, wait! Baby Herman : My stogie! Baby Herman : WAAAAAAAA-HAHAHAHAAAAAA! WAAAAAAAAAAAAH! WAAAAAA.

Roger Rabbit : Boy, did you see that? Nobody takes a wallop like Goofy. What timing! What finesse! What a genius!

R.K. Maroon : Ehh! Eddie Valiant : What’s up, Doc? R.K. Maroon : Valiant, are you trying to give me a heart attack? Eddie Valiant : You need a heart, before you can have an attack.R.K. Maroon : Yeah, yeah. You got the will? Eddie Valiant : Sure. I got the will. Question is, do you have the way? I can tell you now it ain’t gonna come cheap.

Bongo : What do you think you’re doing, chump? Eddie Valiant : Who are you calling a chump, chimp? Bongo : Don’t let me catch your peeping face around here again. Got it? Eddie Valiant : OOGA-BOOGA!

Judge Doom : Shave, and a haircut. Roger Rabbit : TWO BITS!

Raoul J. Raoul : Cut! Cut, cut, cut, cut, CUT! Baby Herman : What the hell was wrong with THAT take? Raoul J. Raoul : Nothing with you, Baby Herman. You were great. You were perfect. You were BETTER than perfect! It’s Roger, he keeps BLOWING HIS LINES! Roger, what is this? Roger Rabbit : A tweeting bird. Raoul J. Raoul : “A tweeting bird.” Roger, read this script. Look what it says. It says, “Rabbit gets klunked, rabbit sees STARS.” Not birds, STARS!

R.K. Maroon : How much do you know about show business, Mr. Valiant? Eddie Valiant : Only that there is no business like it, no business I know.R.K. Maroon : Yeah. And there’s no business more expensive. I’m 25 grand over budget on the latest Baby Herman cartoon. You’ve saw the rabbit blowin’ his lines. He can’t keep his mind on his work. You know why? Eddie Valiant : One too many refrigerators dropped on his head? R.K. Maroon : Nah, he’s a toon. You can drop anything you want on his head, he’ll shake it off. But break his heart, he goes to pieces just like you or me.

Lt. Santino : Just like a toon to drop a safe on a guy’s head.

Betty Boop : Work’s been kinda slow since cartoons went to color. But I’ve still got it. Boo boo be do, boo.

R.K. Maroon : Roger, I know this seems pretty painful now, but you’ll find someone new. Won’t he, Mr. Valiant? Eddie Valiant : Yeah, sure. Good looking guy like that? The danes will be breaking his doors down. Roger Rabbit : Danes? What danes? Roger Rabbit : Jessica’s the only one for me. You’ll see. We’ll rise above this piddling peccadillo. We’re gonna be happy again. You got that? Happy. Capital H-A-P-P-I. Eddie Valiant : Well, at least he took it well.

Roger Rabbit : Keep it up, Eddie. You’re killing ’em. You’re slaying ’em! You’re knocking ’em DEAD!

Eddie Valiant : Wait a minute. Wait a minute. You mean to tell me that in a fit of jealousy you wrote your wife a love letter? Roger Rabbit : That’s right! I knew that she was just an innocent victim of circumstance. Eddie Valiant : I suppose you used the old lipstick on the mirror routine. Roger Rabbit : Lipstick, yes. Mirror, no. I found a nice, clean piece of paper. Roger Rabbit : “Dear Jessica: How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. One one-thousand. Two one-thousand. Three one-thousand. Four one-thousand. Five.?

Roger Rabbit : Say, Eddie. That sure was a funny dance you did for the weasels. Do you think your days of being a sourpuss are over? Eddie Valiant : Only time will tell. Roger Rabbit : Yeah, well. put ‘er there, pal. Roger Rabbit : Don’t tell me you lost your sense of humor already? Eddie Valiant : Does this answer your question?

Eddie Valiant : Say, Roger. That letter you wrote to your wife at the Ink and Paint Club? Why don’t you read it to her now? Roger Rabbit : Sure thing, Eddie. “Dear Jessica: How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. I, Marvin Acme, of sound mind and body.? It’s the will! Eddie Valiant : Keep reading. Roger Rabbit : “. do hereby bequeath, in perpetuity, the property known as Toontown, to those lovable characters, the toons”!

Jessica Rabbit : Valiant. Eddie Valiant : I always knew I’d get it in Toontown. Jessica Rabbit : Behind you! Eddie Valiant : Drop it, lady! Jessica Rabbit : I just saved your life, and you still don’t trust me? Eddie Valiant : I don’t trust anybody or anything! Jessica Rabbit : Not even your own eyes? Jessica Rabbit : That’s the gun that killed R.K. Maroon, and Doom pulled the trigger. Eddie Valiant : Doom? Jessica Rabbit : I tracked him to the studio, but I was too late to stop him. Judge Doom : That’s right! You’ll never stop me! You’re dead! You’re both dead! Eddie Valiant : Doom! Bullet #3 : Which way did he go? Bullet #2 : I don’t know. He went thataway. Bullet #3 : Let’s go. Eddie Valiant : Dum-dums.

Porky Pig : All right. M-m-m-ove along now. Th-th-there’s nothing left to see here. That’s all folks. Mmm, I like the sound of that. Porky Pig : Porky Pig : Th-th-th-that’s all, folks!

Forensic #1 : Didn’t you used to be Eddie Valiant? Or did you change your name to Jack Daniels?

Does Jessica Rabbit actually love Roger?

This page contains or is about mature content. Continue at your own risk. Jessica Rabbit is Roger Rabbit ‘s wife and the tritagonist of the book and movie, In the book, she was an amoral, up-and-coming star and former comic character, over whom her estranged husband, comic strip star Roger Rabbit, obsessed. She is re-imagined in the film as a sultry, but moral, cartoon singer at a Los Angeles supper club called The Ink and Paint Club.

She is one of several suspects in the framing of her husband, who is a famous cartoon star. She is voiced by Kathleen Turner, Amy Irving was cast to sing “Why Don’t You Do Right?” (a blues song made famous by Peggy Lee) for Jessica’s first scene in the movie. Jessica was based on Lauren Bacall, Rita Hayworth in Gilda (1946), and Veronica Lake (noted for her famous “Peek-A-Boo” hairstyle).

She is one of the most famous sex symbols on the animated screen, being compared to that of Betty Boop or Red Hot Riding Hood. She claims to Eddie Valiant, “I’m not bad, I’m just drawn that way,” which has become a popular quote. She deeply loves her husband Roger, claiming that he makes her laugh and that he makes a more fitting husband than Goofy,

  • It was said by her animators, that Jessica is so “exuberant”, because they wondered how far they could take her behavior without comments from the Walt Disney Studios.
  • After the film, Jessica also appeared in the Roger Rabbit/Baby Herman shorts Tummy Trouble as a nurse, Roller Coaster Rabbit as a damsel in distress, and Trail Mix-Up as a park ranger.

In the first two shorts she made no impression, but in the third short Roger fantasizes over her, calling her a ‘babe in the woods’ and panting like a dog. She also appeared frequently in the Roger Rabbit comic book series, and she had her own feature in most issues of Roger Rabbit’s Toontown such as ” Beauty Parlor Bedlam “, where she comes face to face with her arch-enemy, Winnie Weasel,

  • With the success of the film and upon the opening of Disney’s MGM Studios on May 1, 1989, the film’s characters featured prominently in the company.
  • After taking the Backlot Tram Tour, various props decorated the streets including two different photo opportunities with Jessica: a glittery cardboard cutout and “The Loony Bin” photo shop which allowed you to take pictures in costume standing next to an actual cartoon drawing of characters from the film.

There was also a plethora of merchandise including Jessica Rabbit rub-on stickers called “pressers”. Disagreements between the Walt Disney Company, Amblin Entertainment ( Spielberg ) and Gary K. Wolf (jointly owning rights to the characters) made it difficult for any merchandise or projects to get off the ground and caused the halt of the short film, Hare In My Soup, and the next film Who Discovered Roger Rabbit,

In this prequel, Roger meets his bride-to-be, Jessica Krupnick. A completed score by Alan Silvestri is said to exist as well as test footage and computer generated versions of the characters. Also canceled was an animated TV series, which was replaced by a show called Bonkers about a feline cop, Many park attractions never got out of development, such as Roger Rabbit’s Hollywood,

In 2000, Disney’s MGM Studios stopped using any character memorabilia in the park, though some props are still present. These include a Maroon Cartoon billboard featuring Roger, Jessica, and Baby Herman across from the Indiana Jones Epic Stunt Spectacular show, Eddie Valiant’s office and a cut-out of Roger on the blinds of a neighboring window near the 50’s Prime Time Cafe, and the “ton o’ bricks” hanging near the “Honey, I Shrunk the Kids” Movie Set Adventure.

Who turned down Who Framed Roger Rabbit?

Eddie Murphy turned down Who Framed Roger Rabbit | Movie News

  • Eddie Murphy “feels like an idiot” every time he sees ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit’ – after turning the film down.
  • The 58-year-old star rejected the chance to appear in the 1988 live action/ animated comedy movie – which featured Bob Hoskins as private detective Eddie Valiant who was tasked with exonerating cartoon character Roger Rabbit after he is accused of murder – because he wasn’t sure it would work to have real actors alongside animation.
  • He said: “The only movie I ever turned down that became a big hit was ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit’.

“I was gonna be the Bob Hoskins dude and I was like, ‘What? Animation and people? That sounds like bulls**t to me.’

  1. “Now every time I see it, I feel like an idiot.”
  2. Murphy also admitted he had to pass on an appearance in ‘Ghostbusters’ because he was committed to starring in ‘Beverly Hills Cop’.
  3. Speaking on ‘The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon’, he added: “It wasn’t like I turned it down.
  4. “I wasn’t available because I was doing this other movie.”
  5. Murphy recently confirmed he is to reprise his role as Prince Akeem in ‘Coming To America 2’, which is to drop next year, 32 years after the original motion picture.
  6. In the original, Eddie’s character travels to New York from a fictional African nation to escape an arranged marriage and find an American wife.
  7. Eddie recently said: “A lot of people have this expectation, like people would say to me when they found out I was doing it, ‘Don’t f**k that movie up.’

“So we’ve gone above and beyond what anybody would think. I’m really, really happy with it.” : Eddie Murphy turned down Who Framed Roger Rabbit | Movie News

Why is Roger Rabbit controversial?

Controversy – With the film’s Laserdisc release, Variety first reported in March 1994 that observers uncovered several scenes of subliminal antics from the animators that featured brief nudity of the Jessica Rabbit character. While undetectable when played at the usual rate of 24 film frames per second, the Laserdisc player allowed the viewer to advance frame-by-frame to uncover these visuals.

Many retailers said that within minutes of the Laserdisc debut, their entire inventory was sold out. The run was fueled by media reports about the controversy, including stories on CNN and various newspapers. A Disney exec responded to Variety that “people need to get a life than to notice stuff like that.

We were never aware of its cock, it was just a stupid gimmick the animators pulled on us and we didn’t notice it. At the same time, people also need to develop a sense of humor with these things.” One scene involves Herman extending his middle finger as he passes under a woman’s dress and reemerging with drool on his lip.

  • Other rumors also exist. Gary K.
  • Wolf, author of the novel Who Censored Roger Rabbit?, filed a lawsuit in 2001 against The Walt Disney Company.
  • Wolf claimed he was owed royalties based on the value of “gross receipts” and merchandising sales.
  • In 2002, the trial court in the case ruled that these only referred to actual cash receipts Disney collected and denied Wolf’s claim.

In its January 2004 ruling, the California Court of Appeal disagreed, finding that expert testimony introduced by Wolf regarding the customary use of “gross receipts” in the entertainment business could support a broader reading of the term. The ruling vacated the trial court’s order in favor of Disney and remanded the case for further proceedings.

Asked By: Keith Cooper Date: created: Apr 20 2023

Who is Roger Rabbit accused of killing

Answered By: Kevin Butler Date: created: Apr 22 2023

References –

  1. ^ “Mickey’s Starland Show”, Behind The Voice Actors, Retrieved 2020-09-20,
  2. ^ “Hare Raising Havoc”, Behind The Voice Actors, Retrieved 2020-08-03,
  3. ^ “Goofy Toons Up”, Behind The Voice Actors, Retrieved 2021-04-24,
  4. ^ “Roger Rabbit’s Car Toon Spin”, Behind The Voice Actors, Retrieved 2020-08-03,
  5. ^ “14: JESS HARNELL interview (Animaniacs, the Looney Tunes Show, Rock Sugar)”,
  6. ^ “Minnie’s House and Meet Minnie”, Behind The Voice Actors, Retrieved 2020-08-03,
  7. ^ Jump up to: a b “Roger Rabbit 2 CGI Test 1998 (Not Richard Williams)”, YouTube, Retrieved August 3, 2020,
  8. ^ Jump up to: a b “Voice(s) of Roger Rabbit in Tiny Toon Adventures”, Behind The Voice Actors, Retrieved 2020-08-03,
  9. ^ Jump up to: a b “John Hardel on Twitter: “Although Steven Spielberg was credited as the voice of Roger Rabbit in “New Character Day”, Tom Ruegger confirmed that it was Frank Welker who provided the voice.” “, Twitter, Retrieved September 21, 2022,
  10. ^ Jump up to: a b “Joe Alaskey Animation Reel”, YouTube, Retrieved October 8, 2020,
  11. ^ “Voice of Roger Rabbit in Robot Chicken”, Behind The Voice Actors, Retrieved 2020-08-03,
  12. ^ “Rapid T. Rabbit and Friends Show #688”, YouTube, Retrieved August 3, 2020,
  13. ^ Jump up to: a b c d “I am Gary K. Wolf, author, screenwriter, and the creator of Roger Rabbit. Ask me anything!”, Reddit, October 17, 2013, Retrieved April 13, 2018,
  14. ^ Reyes, Mike (2014-09-11). “Listen To Pee-Wee Herman As The Voice Of Roger Rabbit”, CinemaBlend, Retrieved 5 May 2017,
  15. ^ “Paul Reubens Roger Rabbit Test Footage Reveals Unmade 1982 Version”,2014-09-08.
  16. ^ Arbeiter, Michael. “15 Things You Might Not Know About Who Framed Roger Rabbit”, Mental Floss, Retrieved 4 May 2017,
  17. ^ Bonner, Wesley. “13 Things You Never Knew About ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit’ “, NERVE, Retrieved 5 May 2017,
  18. ^ Rovin, Jeff (1991). The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Cartoon Animals, Prentice Hall Press. pp.223–225. ISBN 0-13-275561-0, Retrieved 8 April 2020,
  19. ^ “WDW Opening Dates”, Archived from the original on 2008-07-04, Retrieved 2008-06-11,
  20. ^ Silverio, Ben (May 20, 2022). “Chip ‘N Dale: Rescue Rangers Writers Doug Mand And Dan Gregor Talk About Creating A Spiritual Successor To Who Framed Roger Rabbit”, Slashfilm, Retrieved May 21, 2022,
  21. ^ “Film Flam”. Darkwing Duck, Season 1 (ABC). Episode 67. September 14, 1991.
  22. ^ For example, fitness expert Monica Brant verifies her efforts to learn the dance in the 1990s in Monica Brant, Monica Brant’s Secrets to Staying Fit and Loving Life (Sports Publishing LLC, 2005), 4,
  23. ^ The dance is even used in the dedication of W. Michael Kelley, The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Calculus (Alpha Books, 2002), ii,
  24. ^ “How to Do the Roger Rabbit”, WONDERHOWTO, Retrieved 5 May 2017,
  25. ^ “Moves from the 80’s”, June 27, 2016.
  26. ^ “Bobby Brown’s Most Trendsetting Style Moments”, May 26, 2022.
  27. ^ “ASK GREG ARCHIVES”, Station Eight: A Gargoyles Fan Site, Retrieved January 14, 2018,
  28. ^ “Exclusive Premiere: MC Lars Raps About ‘Roger Rabbit’ on ‘The Dip’ (Ft. Kool Keith)”,
Asked By: Andrew Evans Date: created: Oct 11 2023

Is Who Censored Roger Rabbit worth reading

Answered By: Kyle Young Date: created: Oct 12 2023

1,219 reviews 8,987 followers July 17, 2020 I may have what some might consider and interesting opinion on this one. It is always hard when reading a book that a movie you love and have seen a dozen times in the past 30 years is based on. Normally I think I would go in with a lot of pre-conceived notions and be completely unhappy with the result when I come out the other side.

  • But, in this case, I am happy with the book, but only because it was easy for me to separate it from the movie.
  • How you ask? I am not 100% sure, but I can say that while the essence and certain key lines (“I’m not bad, I’m just drawn that way”) are still there, it felt completely different – enough so that I was able to enjoy it as a new story.

Perhaps almost sequel-ish. The book is darker and raunchier with some sex and violence a bit more extreme than the movie. But, it was still funny and the relationship between Valiant, Roger, and Jessica was entertaining to follow. Since many of you are probably familiar with the movie, you probably know that this is a satire take on the hard-boiled genre.

I think that anyone who enjoys that genre will find a lot to enjoy here. It contains many of my favorite hard-boiled tropes – especially all of the crazy comparisons made by the main character (i.e. in one scene a character is trying to get coffee and snacks out of vending machines by punching and shaking them.

He gets coffee, but the snack machine will not give in to the pressure – Valiant says that the snack machine “must have had a stronger Union than the coffee machine” I LOLed! 🤣🤣🤣) All in all a fun book. Will you like it if you liked the movie? Maybe.

2020 audio humor

40 reviews 7 followers February 19, 2012 Growing up, I absolutely loved the movie Who Framed Roger Rabbit. I’ve been told many times that my brother and I killed the VHS copy we had from watching it so much, and so we kept having to catch it on the Disney Channel free preview weekends when funds were too tight to buy a new copy.

  1. Eventually I grew up, got a job, and for a small window of a couple years, had disposable income due to not having any financial obligations of my own.
  2. So I bought a copy on DVD.
  3. That’s when I finally noticed on the end credits that it was based upon a book I had never ever heard about.
  4. When I eventually found a copy of the book, the story I read only had fleeting similarities beyond the names and occupations of the main characters.
You might be interested:  The Man Who Played With Fire?

In fact, the book was given a thorough “child-friendly” veneer in its screen treatment, and despite the success of this effort, it still maintained it’s appeal to adults. If they’d been more true to the book, it would have lost out on its cross generation appeal.

loved-movie-also own

795 reviews 350 followers April 8, 2020 “I’m not bad, Mr. Valiant. I’m just drawn that way.” Woah this was veeeery different from the movie! And, I should add, definitely worse. The story is completely different, the character’s personalities are almost opposite, and in general it doesn’t work as smoothly as in the movie. But, overall, it wasn’t a bad book.

audiobooks

315 reviews 55 followers February 20, 2023 This ended up being an interesting read. Yes, it’s the book Who Framed Roger Rabbit? is based on, but unlike the current trend, the original book was the dark and gritty version. While a lot of the characters show up in both versions, the movie and the book have completely different plots.

  1. There are some other differences between the book and movie worlds.
  2. In the book, Toons mainly work in comics and not cartoons.
  3. They speak with speech bubbles that float above their heads, probably explaining the comic thing.
  4. In the book, Toons aren’t nearly indestructible, like in the movie; they can die as easily as humans.

The catch is that they can create limited time doppelgangers to serve as their stunt doubles like Loki in the MCU. Another big difference is that some humanoid toons like Jessica Rabbit are so realistic that they can almost pass as human. In universe conspiracy theories are centered around famous people really being toons.

  • The book plays the story pretty straight, for the most part.
  • It’s a hard-boiled detective story that just happens to take place in a world with Toons.
  • I liked the mystery, but I wasn’t a huge fan of the very ending.
  • I was floating between 3 and 4 stars, and the ending settled it for me.
  • I still think it’s worth a read if you’re a hard-boiled mystery fan or liked the movie.

Being familiar with one won’t ruin the other. There are more Roger Rabbit books, but it sounds like they’re a direct sequel to the movie and retcon this book. Sounds like I’ll probably skip them.

books-to-screen fantasy mystery

2,002 reviews 72 followers November 4, 2017 This book is so amazing. The ending was not what I expected it to be. It kept me guessing till the very last page. This is one of my new favorite books!

fantasy mystery

554 reviews 58 followers May 22, 2020 This is the spoiler free review of Who Censored Roger Rabbit, the spoiler full review that gets into all the gritty details can be found at https://amanjareads.com/2020/05/20/wh. If you are anywhere near my age bracket you’ve very likely seen the movie Who Framed Roger Rabbit.

You probably had a very confusing crush on Jessica Rabbit. Just admit it, I know I did. But you probably didn’t know that the movie was based on a series of noir thriller novels by Gary K. Wolf. I know I didn’t. I recently rewatched the movie and it absolutely holds up. The animation is still breathtaking and the acting is superb.

Seriously, add this to your short list of movies to watch again. But while watching the credits for the movie I saw that ever so telling “based on the novel” caption and couldn’t believe my eyes. This movie, about cartoons living among the humans was a novel?! How.

how does that even work? I had to find out, I bought the kindle edition of the first of the four novels immediately. And let me tell you, this is an impressive piece of fiction. It strongly veers from the plot of the movie, at least this first book does. Hopefully I’ll be able to get the other books soon and see if there are more similar plot elements but this first one is definitely different.

Jessica Rabbit is still in it and still (kind of) married to Roger. She’s described exactly as she looks in the movie. The book does an incredible job of describing the toons. The crazy way they look as well as their inhuman actions and speech bubbles. The speech bubbles even interact in three dimensional space! The plot stands on it’s own for this first book.

It’s not the same as the movie and it has an actual conclusion so the sequels can be assumed to also be stand-alones. It is also far more adult than the movie is. This is truly a hard-boiled action noir thriller that includes violence, sex, and other adult themes. The best part is that it’s just a well crafted mystery.

The reader gets to keep track of clues and follow the trail of the mystery to the surprise twist ending that actually works. There are just enough red herrings to keep the story from being obvious but not so many that you just feel manipulated by the end.

  • Above all else, it’s original.
  • I’ve never read another book like it.
  • It masterfully handles its bizarre concept and grounds it to be serious when it could easily become overly silly.
  • I look forward to reading the others in the series at a future date and would love to hear from anyone else who has read them.

If you love mystery novels add this one to the top of your to read list. It will keep you engaged the entire time and the characters are definitely far from stereotypical or boring. 807 reviews 67 followers January 28, 2020 This is an incredibly well-done mystery with interesting twists, but that’s only part of the appeal: there are really creative fantasy elements (with phenomenal worldbuilding) that are used to comment on societal issues.

It plays with the typical tropes of detective stories and is also really funny. The idea of a world inhabited by cartoon characters and humans is interesting and Gary Wolf really utilizes all of the possibilities: there are comments on racism throughout the book, however the description of how life would work in that situation doesn’t stop there.

Wolf had a lot of fun ideas besides the more serious aspects discussed (which never felt ham-fisted). The reader gets a fascinating look at the entertainment industry, filled with memorable characters. Sure, our protagonist is the stereotypical private detective, for good reason, but most people and toons in this are very much their own.

audiobook fantasy mystery

552 reviews 166 followers September 2, 2017 Good, not great. Dialogue-heavy and laden with lighthearted cliches. Zips along rapidly before losing itself in some gimmicky twists and turns to an oddball deus ex machina of an ending. One of those rare situations where the movie is better than the book-because they rewrote the whole plot, plus cartoon gags work better visually than in writing.3 stars out of 5. 204 reviews 2 followers June 24, 2013 Like probably just about any other person who has read this book since 1988, I decided to read this book due to my love of the film. Well, the book is definitely not the film. It’s a more serious parody of the noir genre, complete with pulpy dialogue and shady characters.

I think the problem for me starts with those parody elements. None of them is done particularly well, they serve the purpose, but only to remind you that you’re reading a parody rather than a tried-and-true novel. The cartoonish elements are downplayed, somewhat associated with racism and classism, but never really addressed in such a way to get across a point.

The plot is windy and twisty, but never particularly engaging. The result is a book that felt, unfortunately, half-realized until it reached the silver screen, where it comes fully into its own. I’m glad I read the book, but would probably recommend to anyone that they skip it and watch the film instead, unless they are a die-hard fan of the story and wants to see where some of the superficial elements of the film came from. 1,197 reviews 54 followers July 30, 2017 Okay but far from great I didn’t realise when I reviewed on Amazon it would overtake my initial review on Goodreads. I’ll review again shortly. 242 reviews 40 followers September 14, 2016 3.5 Esta lectura fue inesperada y debo resaltar que he tenido que desterrar toda idea preconcebida de la película para abordar la historia pues. es totalmente diferente. La película de Disney me encantó, pero es una película de Disney, debe ser políticamente correcta y con mucha acción. 3,722 reviews 260 followers July 1, 2023 Who Framed Roger Rabbit is one of my favorite movies growing up and I didn’t realize it was based on a book until much more recently. I couldn’t help but compare Who Censored Roger Rabbit? ( Roger Rabbit by Gary K.

Wolf to the movie adaptation because it’s so much different. Out of all of the changes one of the smaller ones that surprised me the most is that it’s set in the present for when it was released in 1981 instead of 1947 like in the adaptation. I was also surprised that the toons are primarily in comics rather than in cartoons and that Roger is like 6 feet tall.

While the book is a solid read, I definitely prefer the adaptation and I definitely rewatched it shortly after I finished listening to the audiobook.

audiobook fantasy humor

1,960 reviews 61 followers October 11, 2019 First things first: This is nothing like the story of the movie. The general premise and the characters are all the same, but the plot, motivations, and even the characterization is different here. This might be general information by this point, though, considering every other review I’ve seen mentions something about it.

The thing is, this book shouldn’t be skipped over because it’s not the same story as the movie. Instead of cartoons, we have comic book characters; instead of infidelity, Eddie is investigating a murder; and instead of the main conflict revolving around ToonTown, the plot revolves around a, teakettle.

(Yes, you read that correctly.) There’s a lot of brilliance in this story, not the least of which is the idea that cartoon characters exist as real beings in the world. The plot moves along at a nice pace, and as I neared the end of the book, I was looking for spare moments to read another chapter.

  • I didn’t quite read at stoplights while driving, but I was tempted.
  • Wolf captures the characters of Roger and Eddie perfectly, and develops their relationship appropriately.
  • Again, it’s different from the movie, though there are some similarities, but by the end of the book, they’ve both changed due to their experience together.

It’s touching, and if the last paragraph doesn’t move you, you might want to contact a coroner. The story is hard-boiled, which was a lot of fun. The similes alone are enough to make deviled eggs, and they’re everywhere. Your tolerance of such things could affect how much you enjoy the story.

My only gripe with the story is its conclusion, which just, really? That’s it? I mean, it fits, in a weird sort of way, but it’s, really? That? (Sorry for being vague, but, really?) There are two more novels in this series, but they were written after the movie’s success, and honestly, I don’t see how either of them could be possible.

I might come back to them in a future moment of weakness (I get them a lot), but for now I don’t feel the need to read them immediately. I think I prefer the story of the movie over the book, but that could be because I watched the movie first. It could be because the ending was more satisfying, too, but hey, that’s not enough not to read this book.

2019 crime e-book

990 reviews 133 followers December 11, 2019 There’s a lot going on in this book which inspired one of my favourite movies, “Who Framed Roger Rabbit?” The story in the book is very different from the movie, so it really was only used for inspiration. It goes in many different directions at once.

fantasy historical-fiction humor

409 reviews 8 followers March 28, 2012 There are some films that you can’t help but think “*This* is why there is film. Here’s a movie that is so uniquely cinematic that it couldn’t ever work as a book.” Every time I watch “Who Framed Roger Rabbit” that pops into my mind.

The mixture of live-action and animated characters inhabiting the same world is so very. film. I was sure it could never work as a book. So, imagine my surprise when I discovered that, in fact, the movie was based on a book. Well, saying “based on” is a bit strong. call it “inspired by” instead. When I picked up the book, I honestly expected it to be one of the worst things I would read all year.

And while it might be, that will speak more to the outstanding quality of most of the rest of the things I’ve read, rather than to any failings of the book itself. It was actually a very enjoyable, if very weird, send-up of the hard-boiled detective. Gary K.

  1. Wolf (whose name is every bit as cartoonish as Roger’s) clearly had a love for the genre, and played with the tropes well.
  2. It’s a book that takes itself seriously in almost all the right places.
  3. There are some aspects that don’t quite work-the last act, in particular, falls apart a little with the “solution” to the murder coming very much out of left field-but, for the most part, this is a mystery about double crosses and violence that takes itself seriously even as half the cast are comic strip characters talking through word balloons.

If you’re looking for the light-hearted, goofy fare of the movie, you’re in for a surprise. Roger and cast are a lot more grimy here, but it all sort of mostly works. Not everyone’s cup of tea, certainly, but worth a look if you’re a fan of the genre and looking for something very weird. 729 reviews 17 followers December 25, 2015 This book is completely different from the movie it inspired, the movie I’ve loved since I was a kid and have found layers to appreciate as an adult. It isn’t bad, it’s just wholly different. I’ve written in some reviews on here and in other places that in the past few years I’ve come to terms with the idea of adaptations.

Movies and books will never be perfectly similar because adaptations require each to play to the strengths of the medium in which it’s in. This, however, is much more than an adaptation. The movie took 80% of the same characters and the thinnest connection to the plot in here and then made its own thing.

And that’s good, because this book’s plot points are quite a bit too convoluted for a movie, especially a mass-market movie. Getting away from comparisons and to this book itself, it’s a nice homage to noir detective novels and the first person voice is pretty fun to read.

  • Detective Valiant’s sarcasm and world-weariness are a treat.
  • The mystery is fun to solve and doesn’t seem to be poorly written – most of the difficulty in predicting it ahead of time has to do with unreliable witnesses.
  • The world Wolf crafts is also an interesting one of toon/human segregation.
  • There are some analogies to race-based segregation, but nothing that beats you over the head with a moral.

Wolf also creates a demented cast of characters to populate the world that make for a fun time as he interrogates them. Overall, it’s a fun read if you’re a fan of the noir detective genre and don’t expect it to hew too closely to the movie Who Framed Roger Rabbit.

basis-for-movie

3,642 reviews 47 followers Read April 3, 2023 One of my favorite memories was when my parents went out of town in 1988 and I went to one aunt’s house and my brother went to another. My aunt took me to see Who Framed Roger Rabbit? and we talked about it for years.

  • I’ve seen this movie at least two dozen times, I’ve played the absolutely terrible NES game, and now I’ve read the original book.
  • This is not a novelization, but the book this was adapted from.
  • So reading this novel made me realize who absolutely inspired that movie is.
  • The book is.not great.
  • It’s hugely inventive and some of the different conceits it creates are great.

The toons’ words come up in word clouds (like dialog in comics) and float and eventually collapse. The Roger Rabbit we spend most of our time with is an embodied persona, not the real toon. And what’s really good: the toons are comics, not cartoons, who enact scenes for a photographer to become the Sunday comics.

So those are great, but the execution is pretty bad. The writing is tired, and boring, and the plot drags on with too many twists, and not in a good way. The movie really understood what needed to happen to make this book work on the screen. The biggest choice they make is to set it in the 1940s, as opposed to the novel’s contemporary setting, which is almost an anachronism.

The movie realizes that making it a spin off the old Hollywood tropes of post 1950s cinema makes so much more sense. January 20, 2011 You can’t compare the book with the Disney Film. This is no juvenile literature, no way. Toons live side-by-side with humans, all around the world. They are no cuddly stars, just there to provide entertainment to humans. They “love and hate and cry and laugh”, they struggle for their carreer, they have secrets to keep.

  • They kill.
  • The whole atmosphere is darker.
  • Eddie Valiant relies on cards to pay the rent, he’s a decent man and still a true alcohol lover.
  • You won’t see a single character with no vices here.
  • If you ask me, I tend to prefer the book.
  • What with the scathing remarks in Eddie’s thoughts and the weirdness of the toons speaking in baloons, I can’t remind of a single boring chapter.

Tough with not much action, the story becomes more and more intriguing just to take a final unexpected twist. Which also happens to be the only flaw, in my opinion: as a matter of fact, I don’t like misteries dealing with totally unforeseeable events. Author 1 book 31 followers March 29, 2011 I originally read this shortly after the Disney film came out. As many have said, the only things the book and film have in common are a detective named Eddie Valiant and a Toon named Roger Rabbit, who is accused of killing a human.

Roger is married to Jessica Rabbit, a humanoid Toon knockout and he does work with Baby Herman. From there, the stories shake hands and go their separate ways. I remembered the book being good. Unfortunately, I had a cheap mass-market paperback that fell apart if you looked at it cross-eyed, and it’s taken me a long time to track down another copy (silly me, for not thinking of my Kindle sooner!).

I actually snagged it yesterday afternoon, sat down to read last night, and finished it before going to bed. I’d forgotten some of the characters so it was a pleasant rediscovery. Definitely worth reading again, and I’m sure I’ll come back to it from time to time.

2011-reads anthropomorphic fantasy

137 reviews June 14, 2023 “Who Framed Roger Rabbit” is one of my favorite Disney films and I was looking forward to reading the original source material. The book’s plot is very different than the film’s but I can see the elements that were used from the book for the 1988 film.

The hybrid world of humans and toons is fascinating and Roger is a more gritty character than his film adaptation. The story is told through Eddie Valiant’s perspective and it was so amusing to read. It felt like a stereotypical 1950s detective novel with offbeat similes and metaphors reminiscent of film noir.

If you are a fan of the film I highly recommended reading the book. There are also two sequels which interest me because I’m curious what elements from those books made it into the film. I discussed this book in comparison to the film on the podcast Dizney Coast to Coast available wherever you get your podcasts.

audio-book disney own

717 reviews 1,246 followers December 30, 2019 “Who Censored Roger Rabbit? (Roger Rabbit #1)” was the basis for the movie “Who Framed Roger Rabbit”, and although the book was published decades ago, it was only recently released as an audiobook. This is another book that was selected for a road trip with a car full of mixed sexualitiesi.e., not everyone enjoys lesbian romance or erotica (when oh when will they succumb to their true natures?) Anyway, the movie was more fun; this book is darker and both Roger and Jessica rabbit are jerks.3* 371 reviews 37 followers May 19, 2022 Ein sehr zufriedenstellendes Buch. 25 reviews July 28, 2022 In order to read this book you have to completely dissociate it from the movie. The concept is similar but characters, personalities, etc. vastly different. I also find mystery stories tend to have a slow build up which can be tough to power through. I do recommend this book because it is very well written and the story is still good. 229 reviews January 11, 2016 I’ve been intrigued by Who Censored Roger Rabbit? for years, ever since I heard that it was the basis for Who Framed Roger Rabbit a movie I love. For a while, I couldn’t find it anywhere, then, one day, it showed up at my local library.

  • I checked it out, read it.and was so, So, SO disappointed.
  • Man, what a weird, uninteresting book.
  • The plot-Eddie Valiant is hired by Roger Rabbit to find out what is going on with his contract.
  • Roger wants to be in a solo comic strip, and the DeGreasy Brothers, his bosses, won’t let him, no matter how illogical it is to keep him.

His wife, Jessica Rabbit, is cheating on Roger with Rocco DeGreasy. The day after Eddie is hired, both Rocco and Roger are dead. Eddie is then drawn into the investigation of the double murders, while also getting caught up in a comic strip scandal, some affairs, and some odd adventure.

  1. OK, some of the issues with this book are prevalent in the plot description.
  2. First of all, Roger is a comic strip character.
  3. In fact, Roger (and all the characters) actually talks in speech bubbles. OK.
  4. The characters who are animated are in.comic book strips. Weird.
  5. But, sadly, these aren’t the only problems with the book.

The book is set in the 1980’s, so cartoon characters are wearing jeans. Roger and Jessica are not only not in love, but are also incredibly unlikable. I did not care at all if these characters would get back together, Eddie is not that interesting. He has no girlfriend (who is an awesome character in the movie.

  1. Yay Delores!).
  2. And Eddie has no reason to hate ‘toons.
  3. The movie gave a good reason why Eddie hates toons, but here, he just hates ‘toons, but all humans in this book hate ‘toons.
  4. I think it’s supposed to be a racial allegory, (all humans hate ‘toons, ‘toons are treated as second class citizens) but it just feels so weird and so out of place in this book.

And my biggest problem with this book, something that made me bring this book down to one star is.cartoon characters can die from gunshot wounds. No, really, Roger Rabbit dies from being shot. Like, seriously? Has the author seen any of the Bugs Bunny/Daffy Duck “Rabbit Season/Duck Season” cartoons? Seriously, go watch Who Framed Roger Rabbit, NOPE

1-star

253 reviews 23 followers July 6, 2021 Winifred says: Yes, the movie (Who Framed Roger Rabbit) was inspired by a book. A hardboiled private detective named Eddie Valiant unexpectedly has one to two days at most to solve a murder. It is a classic Whodunit but for the sheer level of creative concepts, with imaginative twists and turns that keep you turning the pages for more.

  • If you thought the movie was creative, it’s no real surprise as it took the already-genius ideas of the book and dialed it up by 11.
  • There are still flaws (e.g., the characters are generally one layered; who you meet is mostly who you get throughout the story), but it has a unique take in a popular genre with good writing behind it.

Things to Consider: Even if you’ve seen the film, give the book a chance as the film is a VERY LOOSE adaptation with only some of the core concepts and character names being carried over. The book has a very big spoiler in the beginning (and other plot twists later), so tread carefully around it.

adult-fiction

310 reviews 31 followers May 2, 2017 Maybe its my love and nostalgia for the movie but I just couldn’t get into this. I could handle the corniness of comic cartoon characters, doppleganers and visible speach balloons but when the subject of SPOILER The homicidal teakettle Genie that’s when I lost all hope for this book. 4,385 reviews 405 followers November 28, 2020 Maybe not the best written book ever, but definitely a fun one. I knew the characters but never seen the movie, so the story was new for me and I highly enjoyed it. Liked that it was set very much in reality but had some odd bits thrown in to make it unique and so entertaining. Really want to see the movie now