Asked By: Carl Morris Date: created: Jun 18 2023

Did Jake die in Avatar 2

Answered By: James Baker Date: created: Jun 19 2023

Avatar: The Way of Water features the deaths of some memorable Avatar characters, but not Jake Sully. Here’s why Jake doesn’t die in the movie. Jake Sully does not die in Avatar: The Way of Water for these simple reasons. Avatar: The Way of Water is the sequel to Avatar, the highest-grossing film ever made, and while it does not quite match its predecessor in terms of box office numbers, it still brought in an impressive $2.3 billion.

  • Considering that astounding number, it is no surprise that the Avatar franchise’s creator, James Cameron, has promised three more films in the franchise.
  • Avatar: The Way of Water is a gorgeous film with a gripping story, and though many characters die in Avatar 2, there is still hope for the Na’vi to save their home world of Pandora.

The Way of Water sees the return of humans to Pandora and another conflict between greedy humans and the peaceful Na’vi. Due to the story’s takes, there was some concern that Jake Sully, the protagonist of the film, might be among the casualties. However, the character managed to survived through the end of Avatar: The Way of Water,

Asked By: Carl Bell Date: created: Feb 05 2024

How does Avatar 2 end

Answered By: Stanley Gray Date: created: Feb 08 2024

– Article continues after ad While the kids manage to break free, Jake and Quartich begin a long fight. They duke it out on their banshees, exchanging gun fire and biting the neck’s of one another’s animals. Meanwhile, Neteyam is shot and killed while trying to help Lo’ak and Spider escape.

As Neytiri screams over losing her son, Quaritch contacts Jake again, offering him the same choice: his life for his daughters’ lives. Jake finds Tuk, but Quaritch holds a knife to Kiri’s neck. In response, Neytiri kills every remaining RDA soldier in sight and slices her knife across Spider’s chest, knowing it’ll provoke Quaritch, as he’s his son.

As she threatens to kill him, Quaritch lets Kiri go. Just as you think they’re about to be free, Jake takes on Quaritch mano a mano. Article continues after ad However, the others find themselves in immense peril: Tuk is sucked into the bowels of the sinking ship, with Neytiri going after her; and Spider and Kiri are left alone on the surface as the boat begins to rise and fall like the Titanic.

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  • Jake eventually beats Quaritch, seemingly killing him underwater – but this leaves him trapped.
  • Lo’ak finds him and teaches him how to breathe in order to survive, while Kiri uses her powers to summon the glowing, underwater fireflies (they’re essentially like the ocean’s equivalent of wood sprites) to find Neytiri and Tuk, taking them to safety.

Article continues after ad 20th Century Studios There’s a twist though: Quaritch wasn’t killed. Spider finds him convulsing under the water, and against his better (and inevitable) judgement, he rescues him. He’s bruised, battered, and alone, but Spider doesn’t go with him. He hisses at his dad before returning to Jake and Neytiri, and Quaritch flies off on his own, presumably back to the RDA base.

“All energy is borrowed,” said the legend in Avatar. The movie ends with Neteyam’s funeral, with the golden tentacles of the seabed gently wrapping around him and embracing his energy for the final time.Jake and Neytiri are officially welcomed as part of the Metkayina clan. “I can’t run from it, this is my fortress,” he says as the camera approaches his closed-eyed face.

Just like the original film, his eyes open, and the credits boom onto the screen. Article continues after ad

Asked By: Jayden Wood Date: created: Dec 17 2023

Does the main girl die in Avatar 2

Answered By: Blake Davis Date: created: Dec 17 2023

Does Neytiri die in “Avatar 2”? Here’s what we know. – The new film takes place more than a decade after the events of the original Avatar. Jake Sully ( Sam Worthington ) has been living as one of the Na’vi alongside his mate Neytiri ( Zoe Saldaña ). Together, they raise a whole family, including an adoptive daughter named Kiri ( Sigourney Weaver ) as they live and thrive on the planet of Pandora.

  • When a new threat faces the people of Pandora, Jake and his clan turn to a water-based tribe in order to band together and defend their home.
  • While Neytiri is an established presence in the Avatar franchise, there were signs within the sequel’s official trailer hinting that Neytiri dies within the events of the new film.

In an emotional heart-to-heart with her father, Kiri tries to explain that she can feel her mother’s “mighty” heartbeat through the planet. Later in the trailer, a Na’vi from the water-based tribe explains that on Pandora, the titular way of water connects all things on their planet in life and in death.

  1. Article continues below advertisement For those worried about Neytiri, we have good news: She does not die in Avatar: The Way of Water,
  2. Things do look dire for both her and Jake at one point, though.
  3. Near the end of the film, they set out to confront Miles Quaritch, who has captured their children on a commandeered whaling vessel.

(If you’re wondering how Quaritch could be in the sequel, he was cloned as a Na’vi and maintains his memories from before his death in the first film). Article continues below advertisement After a fight aboard the whaling vessel, Jake and Neytiri find themselves trapped as the damaged vessel begins to sink (along with Quaritch and their youngest child, Tuk).

Asked By: Thomas Cook Date: created: May 29 2023

Does Miles die in Avatar 2

Answered By: Leonars Brown Date: created: May 31 2023

Colonel Quaritch Returns in an Avatar Body in The Way of Water – Avatar 2 has Colonel Quaritch return from the dead – in a way, at least. Though the original Miles Quaritch was indeed killed by Neytiri at the end of the first film, his superiors uploaded a record of his memories and consciousness into a cloned Avatar body.

This essentially allows him to escape death, even if it is in a less-than-human form. This actually offers a lot of interesting narrative potential, but the lack of movement on these story beats is the first place where Avatar 2 fails the franchise’s chief villain. Real deal or not, anyone with even an inkling of the personality that Miles Quaritch had, let alone after learning of the original’s death at the hands of a Na’vi, would be disgusted at being “reborn” in the enemy’s blue-skinned body.

The Quaritch clone should have hated himself for living in such a state, and his desire for vengeance should have only been strengthened by this. Though he has a grudge against Jake Sully and his wife Neytiri, Avatar Quaritch should have had an extra bone to pick with them due to them being the reason that he was now “damned” in the form of an alien Na’vi.

Is Jake Sully still human?

Jake Sully transforms from human to Na’vi in James Cameron ‘s Avatar, with the movie even establishing the time that it happens. Cameron’s 2009 sci-fi mega-hit, Avatar, continues to stand as a cinematic landmark and is the highest-grossing movie ever made.

Long after its release, Avatar continues to amaze and astound with its mesmerizing visual effects bringing the alien world of Pandora to life. At the end of Avatar, the film’s human protagonist Jake Sully ( Sam Worthington ) chooses to stay on the Na’vi’s homeworld of Pandora and become a Na’vi himself.

With a human-constructed Na’vi body known as an “Avatar”, Jake’s soul is permanently transferred into his Na’vi body at the Na’vi’s sacred location known as the Soul Tree. With the event being a highly significant ritual for Jake and the Na’vi alike, Avatar even provides the date and time that Jake’s full transferral into his Na’vi form takes place.

11/15/2022by Brad Curran ScreenRant.com

Asked By: Martin Allen Date: created: May 11 2024

Did the baby whale die in Avatar 2

Answered By: Abraham Washington Date: created: May 11 2024

The Tulkun Way – The Tulkun are a species of whale-like creatures native to the oceans of Pandora. They don’t appear in Avatar: The Way of Water until the second act, when Jake Sully, Neytiri, and their 4 kids – Neteyam (Jamie Flatters), Lo’ak (Britain Dalton) Kiri (Sigourney Weaver), and Tuk (Trinity Jo-Li Bliss) – have all found refuge from the freshly revived Quaritch clone and his Avatar squadron in the islands of the Metkayina, an oceanic Na’vi clan.

  • Abiding by their family code, “Sullys stick together,” the group trades the vines and branches of Eywa’s forests for her reefs and oceans in an effort to spare their original clan from Quaritch, who is holding their unofficial fifth human child Spider (Jake Champion) hostage for intel.
  • The Sullys must adapt to an aquatic lifestyle if they are to survive, and one of the Metkayina’s biggest lessons comes with respecting and honoring the Tulkun.

Similar to our own cetaceans, the Tulkun are interconnected by their own language and rich family histories. However, in true Avatar fashion, these whales are far more” spiritual” and “emotional” than humans as Jemaine Clement’s Dr. Ian Garvin points out in the film.

Their aquatic culture includes poetry, mathematics, and more. The Tulkun are the spiritual brothers and sisters of the Metkayina, each Na’vi clan member engaging in a lifelong bond with an individual whale. The Metkayina and the Tulkun celebrate life and death in unity. As such, the Metkayina know how to communicate with these whales and stand by their ancient doctrine, the “Tulkun Way,” which states their rules for maintaining peace in Pandora’s oceans.

The Tulkun are Pandora’s largest fauna to be reckoned with (that we’ve seen at least), but not even their might can stand a chance against the sky people’s colonialist wrath. ‘Avatar: The Way of Water’ courtesy of 20th Century Studios When Quaritch starts to sweep the island clans in search of the Sullys, he realizes that making an example of the Tulkun is the only thing that can draw them out. He knows the Na’vi will bend to his will when their ecosystem is at stake, and the whales have become the new primary target for human exploitation on Pandora since their re-invasion.

Until now, the sky people have found a way to get the resources they want from the Tulkun without Na’vi interference. This all changes in what is certainly the most important scene in Avatar: The Way of Water – a sequence that so vividly represents our connection to this franchise and how it’s managed to resonate so deeply with audiences worldwide.

Yes, we’re talking about the tragic whaling of a Tulkun mother and the subsequent death of her newborn calf.

How did Grace get pregnant in Avatar?

In the new movie, it is revealed that Grace has a secret child Kiri, who is a young Na’vi girl. But who is her other parent? – Agencies Just 5 mins into the movie, you will discover one of the biggest mysteries of Avatar: The Way Of Water. It is that scientist Grace has a secret child Kiri, who is a young Na’vi girl, the media reports said. In the first movie, Grace died, but her daughter was never revealed.

  • Grace died, but she also didn’t deliver her child.
  • But Grace left behind her Na’vi avatar, which was kept in stasis by Neytiri, Jake Sully, and her other scientist friends, as per media reports.
  • Grace’s avatar gives birth to Kiri, and Jake adopts her.
  • Jake describes Juri’s conception as a total mystery.

It could be an immaculate conception. There’s a theory that the film director James Cameron could be hiding a vital feature of the Na’vi. According to that theory, Na’vi could reproduce asexually. Unless that theory is true, Grace was impregnated by someone.

  1. Iri’s brothers joke that the scientist Norm could be her father.
  2. The movie does not reveal much information about the birth of Kiri.
  3. It is unclear whether Kiri was conceived before Grace died and her avatar carried her to term.
  4. Or the complete gestation was done by the avatar.
  5. The identity of Kiri’s true father is not revealed in Avatar: The Way of Water, but there are hints as to who her father could be.

Kiri’s birth isn’t the only mystery around her. She can also sense the Great Mother, who is the deity of the Na’vi. This connection with the deity is manifested in different forms. While Kiri sleeps, the grass moves in sync with her breath, and she can unconsciously draw the sacred wood sprites to herself.

  • It is possible that these unique powers that no other Na’vi possesses could come from her parents.
  • So, her other parent may be neither a Na’vi nor a human.
  • The Great Mother herself could be her second parent.
  • Grace’s last words before she died were that she could see Eywa, the Great Mother.
  • So it is possible that she joined the common neural network of all living beings in Pandora.

If that is true, it could be the reason why Kiri could see her when she linked into the Tree of Souls. Eywa could have impregnated Grace’s avatar with her magical abilities; thus came Kiri. So, Eywa may be Kiri’s second parent. We hope her parentage will be revealed in the next movie.

Does Jake become an Avatar permanently?

Old, New, Borrowed and Blue: Compulsory Able-bodiedness and Whiteness in Avatar | Disability Studies Quarterly In the year since its highly anticipated release, James Cameron’s Avatar has had a colossal international impact. It has grossed nearly $3 billion, been screened in over sixty countries and revolutionized the new media landscape with its innovative special effects.

It is a film whose essence lies in the sensational power of 3-D technology. Avatar immerses its viewers in the fictional world of Pandora, a distant moon whose iridescent flora appear to be enticingly within reach. Neon plant fronds lurch from the screen, misty cliffs reveal dizzying depths and limber blue beings bound through endless layers of topiary.

In the literal sense, it is truly spectacular. And yet, underneath all the cinematic flair unfolds a hackneyed tale. The aesthetic glitz delivers a stereotypical story in which boy meets girl, colonizer rescues indigenous, and the erasure of disability serves once again as the ultimate happy ending.

At the heart of this brave, new dreamscape lies the familiar story of a disabled character driven by fantasies of able-bodied bliss. Main character Jake Sully (Sam Worthington) narrates the first shot of the film, an aerial drift over a lush rainforest, with the following: “When I was lying there in the VA hospital with a big hole blown through the middle of my life, I started having these dreams of flying.

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I was free. Sooner or later, though, you always have to wake up.” Waking up, for Jake, means confronting the physical impairment of paraplegia, acquired in military combat. When we first see him immediately after this narration, he is tightly framed in the cold confinement of a cryogenic chamber.

The space is suffocating and small, the lighting cold and utterly sterile. The contrast between these two initial scenes is jarring, and intentionally so, since from the start we are to understand that Jake’s journey into the exoticized land of Pandora will come to symbolize freedom from his disabled body.

Hired to replace his deceased twin, Jake Sully accepts a job as an avatar operator on Pandora. Genetically linked to a nondisabled body that resembles the indigenous Na’vi, Jake works to negotiate Na’vi resettlement so that his employer can pillage their land for minerals.

While Jake succeeds in gaining acceptance into the Na’vi, his love for the chief’s daughter Neytiri (Zoe Saldana) and his burgeoning appreciation for the Na’vi’s environmentally sustainable culture lead him to abandon his mission. Aided by a few sympathetic (human) scientists, Jake successfully leads the Na’vi in battle by driving out the predatory humans.

In the film’s closing scene, the Na’vi transfer Jake into the avatar body permanently, eradicating his disability and neatly delivering him from his original role as a white colonizer. Even before he uses the avatar, Jake bargains for able-bodiedness in a deal with the company’s military leader, the hyper-masculine Colonel Quartich (Stephen Lang).

Quartich likes the idea of having a jarhead in the avatar crew and sees an opportunity to obtain military intelligence: “You get me what I need and I’ll see to it you get your legs back when you rotate home.” Clad in a robotic suit, he then leans in and points a metallic finger at Jake, saying, “Your real legs.” The irony of Quartich using an artificial hand to emphasize this point swiftly fades as Jake grins, “That sounds real good, sir.” In this key scene, Jakes concedes to two assumptions made by Quartich.

The first is that Jake wants to be able-bodied; the second, that his disabled legs are not his “true” self. Central to the narrative logic of Jake Sully’s character is a concept that Robert McRuer has termed compulsory able-bodiedness (381). McRuer notes that definitions of able-bodiedness are articulated in negative terms as in “free from disability” so that able-bodiedness is always dependent on disability in same way that heterosexuality is definitively dependent on homosexuality (385).

While such a binary implies two choices, people are socially compelled to adhere only to one, rendering the expectation that everyone at all times desires to be able-bodied. In Avatar, this fantasy of able-bodiedness is interwoven with a return to heteromasculine military readiness and the possibility of romantic (heterosexual) love.

Upon first entering the avatar body, Jake rips off his monitoring cables and jubilantly sprints through the Pandora forest, relishing the sensation of running that he has been unable to access in his human form since his spinal cord injury. Thus, his first journey into Pandora represents a smugly celebrated freedom from disability, a point underscored by the dramatic visual attention given to his first run with his “new” legs.

While the other scientists struggle with their anthropological study of the Na’vi, it is Jake who gains entry into the group by means of a seemingly mystical blessing from the forest. When Neytiri first spots Jake, she raises her bow and arrow to kill him, but stops when a glowing white seedling gently drifts down into the frame: Something about him is different.

Somehow, we are shown, he is sacred. Sure enough, after their first discussion, the seedlings overwhelm Jake’s body as he holds his long, blue arms outstretched in a divine Christ-pose. It is an image steeped in paternalism: at last, the white, able-bodied savior has arrived.

In addition to his shift toward able-bodiedness, Jake also experiences a racial transformation. Over the course of the film, he undergoes a series of rites of passage that incorporate him in the Na’vi. He learns to hunt, is given ceremonial induction into the tribe, and beds down with Neytiri. While this romanticized pattern of “going native” is hardly new (see, for example, the Kevin Costner film Dances with Wolves ), his permanent transfer into the avatar body adds an unsettlingly literal level to the process of shedding whiteness.

Jake’s love affair with Neytiri ritualizes through sex a process that bell hooks has termed “eating the Other.” For hooks, intimate contact with racialized Others often figures as a way to assuage the guilt of the colonizer and to bypass the thorny issues of domination by trying to actually become the Other (25).

Since the biotechnology of Jake’s avatar actually makes this physically possible, Avatar manages to extend this cultural phenomenon to the level of corporeal spectacle. As Jake makes himself over as Other, he is shown to be shedding the guilt of his role of colonizer, but not necessarily the privileges ascribed to it.

As the film nears its climax, Jake becomes the military leader of the Na’vi as they wage war on Colonel Quartich’s imperial forces. During the showdown, Quartich calls Jake out on his race traitor ways: “Hey, Sully, how does it feel to betray your own race? You think you’re one of them?Time to wake up.” Quartich then turns from Jake’s avatar and proceeds to smash open the (human) Jake’s avatar chamber, exposing the Jake’s human body to the poisonous atmosphere of Pandora.

Although Jake is unable to reach the oxygen mask, he is quickly rescued by Neytiri, who slays Quartich and revives Jake, cradling him in her arms. In this scene, disability switches Jake from the enactor of paternalism to its recipient. However, this temporary reversal is short-lived, as the Na’vi reward Jake’s bravery with permanent assignment to his Na’vi body — and concomitant able-bodiedness — as the pathway to full acceptance into their community.

Compulsory able-bodiedness is not only central to the narrative of Avatar, but was also a key part of its production. Although there is not a single frame in which Jake Sully’s human body walks, an ambulatory actor (Worthington) was nevertheless cast.

  • To provide the appearance of a paraplegic’s atrophied legs, director James Cameron commissioned the production of prosthetic legs for Worthington, and post-production, digitally edited out any trace of the actor’s actual legs.
  • The special effects team, Legendary Effects, created these prosthetic legs by casting the legs of an actual paraplegic man.

This tortuous process of special effects and additional effort demonstrates quite dramatically the extent to which compulsory able-bodiedness is always defined by the presence of disability.

  • hooks, bell. Black Looks: Race and Representation, Boston, MA: South End Press.1992. Print.
  • McRuer, Robert. “Compulsory Able-Bodiedness and Queer/Disabled Existence.” The Disability Studies Reader, Ed. Lennard J. Davis.3rd ed. New York: Routledge, 2010.383-392. Print.
  • Stamberg, Susan. “Belief On The Big Screen: Secrets Of Special Effects.” National Public Radio,5 Mar.2010. Web.12 Dec.2010.

Despite extensive efforts, I was not able to locate the name of the sit-in whose body was copied in the process of digitally creating Jake Sully’s legs. National Public Radio correspondent Susan Stamberg describes him in a curious sentence: “They found a Sam -sized young man — whose paralysis didn’t stop him from playing basketball — and made a cast of his legs.” Apparently it was more important to Stamberg to marvel at this man’s physical abilities than to mention his name. Her statement presents disability as an obstacle to be overcome and it is precisely this kind of perception that perpetuates compulsory able-bodiedness.

: Old, New, Borrowed and Blue: Compulsory Able-bodiedness and Whiteness in Avatar | Disability Studies Quarterly

Does everyone survive in Avatar 2?

A major showdown between human military forces and the Na’vi and Metkayina tribes in Avatar 2 prevented all the characters from coming out alive. WARNING: This article contains SPOILERS for Avatar: The Way of Water Not every character in James Cameron’s epic Avatar: The Way of Water ends up making it out alive in the movie – there are a few characters who die. The sequel to the groundbreaking 2009 movie Avatar was released in theaters in December 2022, twelve years after the original’s debut.

  1. Avatar 2 went on to generate $2.3 billion at the box office, making it the third highest-grossing film ever made after Avengers: Endgame at roughly $2.8 billion and the original Avatar at $2.9 billion.
  2. Cameron’s series of sequels have been in development for over a decade.
  3. Avatar 2 introduced the Metkayina tribe, who fought alongside Jake Sully and the Na’vi in The Way of Water,

Avatar 3 is set to explore new parts of Pandora and could potentially include new species of Na’vi in their fight against the human “alien” invaders. Whether or not this is the plan for the upcoming Avatar movies, the first two have already been built around the necessity of warfare, and with warfare comes loss.

Who is the saddest death in Avatar 2?

Who dies in Avatar 2? – The main death in Avatar 2 is Neteyam, Jake and Neytiri’s eldest son. He’s shot and killed by Quaritch while trying to escape the RDA’s boat with Lo’ak and Spider. They all get out, but as they rise to the surface, Neteyam reveals he’s bleeding and struggling to breathe as a result of the bullet wound.

  1. They rush him back to the shore, but he dies in Jake and Neytiri’s arms.
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  3. Article continues after ad There are other deaths: Scoresby, the nasty Tulkun whaler, gets his just desserts when his arm is ripped off by the cable of his explosive harpoon.

All of the recombinants bar Quaritch are killed in the final battle, and countless RDA folks are crushed, impaled, shot, or drowned. While the trailer seemed to hint at the deaths of Neytiri, and the film seems to toy with the idea of killing off Jake, the central duo live to fight another day.

Asked By: Lucas Jones Date: created: Mar 21 2024

Why is Avatar 2 so sad

Answered By: Logan Garcia Date: created: Mar 23 2024

Post-Avatar Depression Syndrome – 20th Century Studios Avatar: The Way of Water was highly anticipated by cinema and ultimately James Cameron lovers. The first installment of the franchise is the highest-grossing movie in cinema history, and the second installment is third place on the list.

  • Therefore, it was no surprise the hype the sequel got even before it was released in cinemas worldwide.
  • However, while many fans loved the movie, a somewhat significant part of them reported adverse and extremely serious effects on their mental health, known as Post-Avatar Depression Syndrome.
  • Post-Avatar Depression Syndrome causes suicidal thoughts and depression in some viewers.

These emotions were evoked by how dark and depressing the real earth we live in is when compared to the gorgeous views of Pandora. Also, everyday life felt lacking and boring when compared to the ones experienced by the Na’vi. This phenomenon doesn’t necessarily happen right after watching the first or the second movie: most people who experience it notice it years later when rewatching the movie or even seeing a documentary or video where the production is discussed.

Who is the pregnant one in Avatar 2?

“I don’t know a single pregnant woman who found out she was pregnant, sat down, and did nothing,” the Oscar winner says. “You just become kind of bionic, you feel like you are absolutely superhuman.” Hollywood rarely depicts pregnant women as physically formidable forces on screen, but Kate Winslet gets to bring one of those rare roles to life.

  • The Oscar winner discusses the impact of appearing in Avatar: The Way of Water as Ronal, the more spiritual leader of the reef-dwelling Metkayina Na’vi tribe who’s seen in the film charging into the heat of battle while with child.
  • Winslet tells EW that director James Cameron had already made the call that Ronal would be pregnant.

“I just thought, ‘My god, that is just so cool,'” she says. “Jim has so much admiration for women and pregnant women and what pregnant women are capable of, and how pregnant women are actually much more resilient and physically capable than I think often people give us credit for or would expect.” Kate Winsletattends the “Avatar: The Way Of Water” World Premiere at Odeon Luxe Leicester Square on December 06, 2022; Ronal (Kate Winslet) and the Metkayina clan in 20th Century Studios’ AVATAR: THE WAY OF WATER Kate Winslet stars as Ronal, who leads the Metkayina clan with Tonowari, in ‘Avatar: The Way of Water.’ | Credit: Karwai Tang/WireImage; 20th Century Studios “The things we can achieve, I mean, my God, I don’t know a single pregnant woman who found out she was pregnant, sat down, and did nothing,” the actress adds.

You just become kind of bionic; you feel like you are absolutely superhuman. And so for Jim to really harness that quality and ability and put it into its Na’vi form, it was just amazing. I loved that so much.” Avatar: The Way of Water picks up years after the events of the first film, which hit theaters in 2009 and became the highest-grossing movie in the world.

The nefarious RDA from Earth has returned to try to colonize the moon of Pandora, home to the Na’vi. Jake Sully ( Sam Worthington ) now has a family with Neytiri ( Zoe Saldaña ) that includes the young Neteyam (Jamie Flatters), Lo’ak (Britain Dalton), Tuk (Trinity Bliss), Kiri ( Sigourney Weaver ), and Spider (Jack Champion).

Jake is leading his clan to disrupt the RDA’s supply chains until he’s forced to disappear with his family for their protection. Hunted by Col. Quaritch ( Stephen Lang ), back from the dead after his consciousness gets uploaded to a Na’vi Avatar body, the Sullys seek refuge with the Metkayina, who teach them how to adapt to water life.

Ronal is a Metkayina chieftan alongside Cliff Curtis ‘ Tonowari. Cameron told EW that while Tonowari is the “Olo’eyktan,” meaning the male leader who handles “hunting, weaving,” and “any kind of fabrication work,” Ronal is the “Tsahìk,” meaning “the spiritual leader, the shaman, the keeper of wisdom.” AVATAR: THE WAY OF WATER Ronal (Kate Winslet) and Tonowari (Cliff Curtis) lead the Metkayina clan in ‘Avatar: The Way of Water.’ | Credit: 20th Century Studios “I remember thinking she was so much more juicy and feminine than I had imagined in my mind,” Winslet recalls of seeing the first mock-ups of her character.

Strangely, I imagined she would feel much more severe and almost older in a way, just because the role was so wise and so powerful. I sort of associate those qualities with people who are older than me and cleverer and more worldly. So it was really nice to see just how feminine and free she was. I wasn’t expecting that.” Seeing that concept art and visualization helped shape Winslet’s performance, as did Ronal’s role as a mother in the film.

Once Avatar: The Way of Water started shooting in New Zealand, Winslet says they decided Ronal “would really be the mother who was helping the other young new mothers” in the context of the story. “She was almost the shamanic figure in the community, as well, bringing age-old traditions and things that she had learned, whether it was potions and herbs and spells and chants and rituals that would help people to heal or with fertility and so on,” she explains.

“Those were things that we were also able to add. They are certainly things that really interest me, so I appreciated that because it not just gave her more of a specific role within the community as a mother, but it really embedded a sense of togetherness that was led by a woman. She was that leader making those decisions, looking out for everyone, not just her own kin.” Avatar: The Way of Water opens in theaters this Friday.

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Is there a secret ending in Avatar 2?

Does ‘Avatar: The Way of Water’ Have an End Credit Scene? – Image via 20th Century Studios Avatar: The Way of Water does not have an end credit scene, but you should probably stick around to the very ending to see all the talented visual effects wizards that contributed to the groundbreaking technical achievements.

Asked By: Dennis Hernandez Date: created: Jun 21 2023

Will there be a Avatar 3

Answered By: Reginald Adams Date: created: Jun 23 2023

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Avatar 3
Directed by James Cameron
Screenplay by
  • James Cameron
  • Rick Jaffa Amanda Silver
Story by
  • James Cameron
  • Rick Jaffa
  • Amanda Silver
  • Josh Friedman
  • Shane Salerno
Based on Characters by James Cameron
Produced by
  • James Cameron
  • Jon Landau
Starring
  • Sam Worthington
  • Zoe Saldaña
  • Sigourney Weaver
  • Stephen Lang
  • Giovanni Ribisi
  • Kate Winslet
  • David Thewlis
  • Oona Chaplin
  • Michelle Yeoh
Cinematography Russell Carpenter
Edited by
  • David Brenner
  • James Cameron
  • John Refoua
  • Stephen E. Rivkin
Music by Simon Franglen
Production company Lightstorm Entertainment
Distributed by 20th Century Studios
Release date

December 19, 2025

Country United States
Language English
Budget $250 million

Avatar 3 is an upcoming American epic science fiction film directed, written, co-produced, and co-edited by James Cameron, Distributed by 20th Century Studios, it is the third film in Cameron’s Avatar franchise, and a sequel to Avatar: The Way of Water (2022).

  1. Cameron is producing the film with Jon Landau,
  2. Cameron, Rick Jaffa, Amanda Silver, Josh Friedman and Shane Salerno were involved in the writing process.
  3. Cast members Sam Worthington, Zoe Saldaña, Sigourney Weaver, Stephen Lang, Joel David Moore, CCH Pounder, Giovanni Ribisi, Dileep Rao, Matt Gerald, Kate Winslet, Cliff Curtis, Edie Falco, Brendan Cowell, Jemaine Clement, Britain Dalton, Trinity Jo-Li Bliss, Jack Champion, Bailey Bass and Filip Geljo reprise their roles from previous films, with Michelle Yeoh, David Thewlis, and Oona Chaplin portraying new characters.

Cameron stated that Avatar: The Seed Bearer is being considered as a possible title for the film. Cameron, who had stated in 2006 that he would like to make sequels to Avatar if it was successful, announced the first two sequels in 2010 following the widespread success of the first film, with Avatar 3 aiming for a 2015 release.

However, the addition of two more sequels (four in total), and the necessity to develop new technology in order to film performance capture scenes underwater, a feat never accomplished before, led to significant delays to allow the crew more time to work on the writing, pre-production, and visual effects.

Avatar 3 started shooting simultaneously with Avatar: The Way of Water in New Zealand on September 25, 2017; filming completed in late December 2020, after over three years of shooting. The film’s theatrical release has been subject to nine delays, with the latest occurring on June 13, 2023; it is scheduled for release on December 19, 2025.

Asked By: Elijah Bailey Date: created: May 05 2023

Will Miles be in Avatar 3

Answered By: Adam Powell Date: created: May 05 2023

Avatar 3 Cast: Who Will Return? – The confirmed cast members for Avatar 3 include familiar faces from the franchise and newcomers. Returning actors include Sam Worthington as Jake Sully, Zoe Saldaña as Neytiri, Sigourney Weaver as Kiri, and Colonel Stephen Lang as Miles Quaritch.

  1. Newcomers to the series include David Thewlis and Michelle Yeoh.
  2. The complete list of cast members announced so far can be seen below: Jake Sully: Sam Worthington Neytiri: Zoe Saldaña Kiri: Sigourney Weaver Miles Quaritch: Colonel Stephen Lang Lo’ak: Britain Dalton Miles ‘Spider’ Quaritch: Jack Champion Tuktirey: Trinity Jo-Li Bliss Tsireya: Bailey Bass Ao’nung: Filip Geljo Ronal: Kate Winslet Tonowari: Cliff Curtis Varang: Oona Chaplin David Thewlis: Dr.

Karina Mogue: Michelle Yeoh Joel David Moore: Norm Parker Selfridge: Giovanni Ribisi Mo’at: CCH Pounder General Frances Ardmore: Edie Falco Captain Mick Scoresby: Brendan Cowell Dr. Ian Garvin: Jemaine Clement Dr. Max Patel: Dileep Rao Corporal Lyle Wainfleet: Matt Gerald Payakan

Is Tuk a girl or boy?

na’vi – Na’vi Name: Tuktirey te Suli Neytiri’ite is the youngest of Jake and Neytiri’s children, and the most precocious. She is wide-eyed to the wonders of Pandora, while also raised to brave its challenges. When at play, “Tuk” is open to friendship with anybody – from the human loyalists at High Camp to the Metkayina at the reef.

Show More Loading. Appearances

  • Avatar: The Way of Water
  • Avatar: The High Ground

Affiliations

  • Omatikaya Clan
  • Metkayina Clan
  • Na’vi

Locations

  • The Hallelujah Mountains
  • High Camp
  • Cove of the Ancestors
  • Metkayina Spirit Tree
  • Metkayina Village (Marui)

Gender

Female

How do avatars mate?

Mating rituals – Concept art of mating After an appropriate mate has been selected, the Na’vi couple will mate before Eywa, often at a sacred site such as the Tree of Voices, During the mating, the couple will connect queues in an act called tsaheylu, This creates a state of unified body consciousness, in which both parties access the physical sensations of the other.

  • A single instance of this act will create a powerful emotional bond that lasts a lifetime.
  • The intertwining of queues is both highly erotic and profoundly spiritual, but is not the actual act of sexual reproduction.
  • The Na’vi have their own version of genitals.
  • Instead, it is merely a part of mating.
  • The tsaheylu bond between Na’vi during mating should also not be confused with the non-erotic tsaheylu bonds Na’vi make with animals and plants, like the “mental reining” that Na’vi use to control animals or the use of the queue to access the Pandoran Neural Network,

The actual reproductive act, which resembles human intercourse, follows the bonding ritual, and the partners remain in a “linked state” during and for some time after the sex act itself. The couple will remain bonded until the next day, when they return to their clan as lifelong mates.

Why didn t Neytiri shoot Jake?

Meeting Jake Sully ( Avatar: Tsu’tey’s Path & Avatar ) – Two years later in 2154, shortly before meeting Jake Sully, Neytiri is meditating at the Tree of Souls with her parents and Tsu’tey. After reflecting, Tsu’tey is excused and leaves to join his group, but Mo’at orders Neytiri, much to her annoyance, to stay, as a Tsahìk is always listening for the will of Eywa. 3D Version: red/cyan, cross-eyed Neytiri reprimands Jake Sully in the forest She continues to follow the avatar because of this symbol. When the avatar is attacked by a pack of viperwolves, she protects him by fending off the creatures. The avatar, whose name is Jake Sully, tries to thank her for the assistance, but Neytiri angrily rejects him as she was forced to needlessly kill three of the viperwolves to protect him.

Asked By: Alex Perez Date: created: May 18 2024

How old is lo ak in Avatar 2

Answered By: Geoffrey Perez Date: created: May 19 2024

How Old Are the Teenagers of ‘Avatar: The Way of Water’? – Image via 20th Century Studios Despite The Way of Water focusing on a new generation of Pandora inhabitants, there’s not even a single line in the entire movie to tell us how old they are. To make things more complicated, we cannot say for sure how Na’vi physiology works.

That means we don’t know how long a child gestates inside their mother’s womb or how fast they age. On top of all that, we don’t even know how long a year lasts in Pandora. It’s almost certain that the rotation of the moon is not the same as Earth’s, so the counting of time there should be completely different from ours.

While The Way of Water doesn’t give fans a clear answer when it comes to the character’s age, we can still deduce a few things. First, there’s Spider. Since he was already born when humans were driven out of Pandora, and The Way of Water takes place after a fifteen-year time jump, we can safely assume Spider is fifteen years old.

Neteyam is the eldest child of Jake and Sully, and grew up with Spider. So, if Na’vi gestates for a similar period to humans, Neteyam is around fourteen years old. Lo’ak is the younger brother of Neteyam, but the two seem to be approximately the same age. That makes Lo’ak around thirteen to fourteen years old.

Kiri gestated in Dr. Grace’s Avatar when Neytiri was no longer pregnant from Neteyam, so she should have been around the same age as Lo’ak. Image via 20th Century Studios The hardest character to figure out is Tuk. She is obviously younger than her siblings, but we can’t tell her age for sure. However, in an interview for IGN, Cameron said that in The Way of Water, Jake and Neytiri “have a family of pre-teens and teenagers.” If we assume he’s also including Tuk, and he has no reason not to, the girl is no younger than nine and no older than twelve.

Judging by how different she looks from her siblings, we would say she is closer to nine. We still don’t know much about Cameron’s alien universe, and we hope Avatar 3 will answer some of our questions. Maybe we’ll also get an official timeline to clear out the date of the main story events and the age of the characters.

Meanwhile, we can still put the puzzle pieces together and form a coherent picture.

Asked By: Oliver Sanders Date: created: Feb 03 2023

Who lost his arm in Avatar 2

Answered By: Miles Harris Date: created: Feb 05 2023

Payakan is the MVP of “Avatar: The Way of Water.” Credit: Courtesy of 20th Century Studios Welcome to Thanks, I Love It, our series highlighting something onscreen we’re obsessed with this week. While Colonel Miles Quaritch (Stephen Lang) is undoubtedly the main antagonist of Avatar: The Way of Water, one character completely eclipses his villainy.

  1. That would be poacher Mick Scoresby (Brendan Cowell), the captain of a Pandoran whaling ship.
  2. In just a few scenes, Scoresby cements his place as the most detestable man on Pandora.
  3. He gloats, he murders, and he delivers extremely villainous (and on-the-nose) dialogue until we’re praying for his downfall.

And boy oh boy, do we get it. We just have to wait until the finale. The third act of The Way of Water sees the Sully family and the Metkayina Na’vi face off against Quaritch, Scoresby, and the RDA (Resources Development Administration). Joining our heroes is Payakan, a whale-like tulkun who has befriended Jake’s son Lo’ak (Britain Dalton).

  • Seeing that the Sully children have been captured by Quaritch, Payakan leaps from the ocean and smashes down on the humans’ ship.
  • Scoresby tries to take Payakan out with a harpoon gun, but our whale-y friend is having none of that.
  • Instead, the space whale wraps the cord of the harpoon around the whaling ship and cuts it in half.

Tactical legend! As Payakan enacts his sweet, sweet vengeance, Scoresby’s arm gets trapped in the harpoon cord. We watch it squeeze tighter and tighter until — snap! — Scoresby flies off into the ocean, his chopped-off arm briefly silhouetted against the sky.

Why was Spider left in Pandora?

Early life – Miles with his mother Paz Miles was born on Pandora in 2154, in the Resources Development Administration ‘s colony base, Hell’s Gate, to Paz Socorro and Miles Quaritch, His mother was later killed during the assault on the Tree of Souls, just as his father was killed at the hands of Neytiri,

  1. After the Na’vis’ victory over the RDA, Miles was too small to be sent to Earth with the rest of the humans and was therefore taken in by McCosker and Mary who were allowed to remain on Pandora.
  2. Despite having a foster mother, Miles wishes his real mother was still alive and he keeps a photograph of her near his bed in his room.

He received the nickname “Spider” due to his natural climbing ability even as a young child, although the low gravity of Pandora has also aided in this. A young Spider playing with the Sully children Despite being a human, Spider always felt like a Na’vi at heart, preferring to spend his time in the Pandoran jungle while donning an exopack and carrying a folding knife for defense. This has frustrated his foster family, who have attempted to get him to spend more time with the humans to little avail.

  • He was enamored by the Sully family, considering Lo’ak, Kiri, and Tuktirey his true family, although he was not as close to Neteyam,
  • Neytiri, however, always saw Spider as one of the people who destroyed her home, believing he belonged with his own kind, and thus acted distant with only a basic amount of respect to him.

Likewise, Spider did not fully consider Jake and Neytiri his adoptive parents, referring to them as “Mr. and Mrs. Sully.” Spider grew especially close to Kiri, the adopted daughter of the family, and she gave him the nickname “monkey boy”.

Does Jake come back in Avatar 2?

Jake Sully – Not surprisingly, Jake Sully (Sam Worthington), the main protagonist of the original movie, is an Avatar 2 returning character. Jake was a disabled Marine who became a part of the Avatar program. His objective was to gather information on the Na’vi for the R.D.A (Resources Development Administration).

  1. After meeting the Na’vi and being initiated into the tribe, Jake grows attached to his new tribesmen and ultimately sides with them against the R.D.A.
  2. At the end of the movie, Jake becomes the tribe’s leader, leaves his human life behind forever, and — through a Na’vi ritual that transfers Jake Sully’s consciousness into his avatar — permanently becomes a Na’vi.

By the time of Avatar 2, Jake will have started a family with Neytiri, who is of course another returning Avatar character.

Is Jake permanently in his Avatar body?

Old, New, Borrowed and Blue: Compulsory Able-bodiedness and Whiteness in Avatar | Disability Studies Quarterly In the year since its highly anticipated release, James Cameron’s Avatar has had a colossal international impact. It has grossed nearly $3 billion, been screened in over sixty countries and revolutionized the new media landscape with its innovative special effects.

It is a film whose essence lies in the sensational power of 3-D technology. Avatar immerses its viewers in the fictional world of Pandora, a distant moon whose iridescent flora appear to be enticingly within reach. Neon plant fronds lurch from the screen, misty cliffs reveal dizzying depths and limber blue beings bound through endless layers of topiary.

In the literal sense, it is truly spectacular. And yet, underneath all the cinematic flair unfolds a hackneyed tale. The aesthetic glitz delivers a stereotypical story in which boy meets girl, colonizer rescues indigenous, and the erasure of disability serves once again as the ultimate happy ending.

At the heart of this brave, new dreamscape lies the familiar story of a disabled character driven by fantasies of able-bodied bliss. Main character Jake Sully (Sam Worthington) narrates the first shot of the film, an aerial drift over a lush rainforest, with the following: “When I was lying there in the VA hospital with a big hole blown through the middle of my life, I started having these dreams of flying.

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I was free. Sooner or later, though, you always have to wake up.” Waking up, for Jake, means confronting the physical impairment of paraplegia, acquired in military combat. When we first see him immediately after this narration, he is tightly framed in the cold confinement of a cryogenic chamber.

  • The space is suffocating and small, the lighting cold and utterly sterile.
  • The contrast between these two initial scenes is jarring, and intentionally so, since from the start we are to understand that Jake’s journey into the exoticized land of Pandora will come to symbolize freedom from his disabled body.

Hired to replace his deceased twin, Jake Sully accepts a job as an avatar operator on Pandora. Genetically linked to a nondisabled body that resembles the indigenous Na’vi, Jake works to negotiate Na’vi resettlement so that his employer can pillage their land for minerals.

While Jake succeeds in gaining acceptance into the Na’vi, his love for the chief’s daughter Neytiri (Zoe Saldana) and his burgeoning appreciation for the Na’vi’s environmentally sustainable culture lead him to abandon his mission. Aided by a few sympathetic (human) scientists, Jake successfully leads the Na’vi in battle by driving out the predatory humans.

In the film’s closing scene, the Na’vi transfer Jake into the avatar body permanently, eradicating his disability and neatly delivering him from his original role as a white colonizer. Even before he uses the avatar, Jake bargains for able-bodiedness in a deal with the company’s military leader, the hyper-masculine Colonel Quartich (Stephen Lang).

Quartich likes the idea of having a jarhead in the avatar crew and sees an opportunity to obtain military intelligence: “You get me what I need and I’ll see to it you get your legs back when you rotate home.” Clad in a robotic suit, he then leans in and points a metallic finger at Jake, saying, “Your real legs.” The irony of Quartich using an artificial hand to emphasize this point swiftly fades as Jake grins, “That sounds real good, sir.” In this key scene, Jakes concedes to two assumptions made by Quartich.

The first is that Jake wants to be able-bodied; the second, that his disabled legs are not his “true” self. Central to the narrative logic of Jake Sully’s character is a concept that Robert McRuer has termed compulsory able-bodiedness (381). McRuer notes that definitions of able-bodiedness are articulated in negative terms as in “free from disability” so that able-bodiedness is always dependent on disability in same way that heterosexuality is definitively dependent on homosexuality (385).

While such a binary implies two choices, people are socially compelled to adhere only to one, rendering the expectation that everyone at all times desires to be able-bodied. In Avatar, this fantasy of able-bodiedness is interwoven with a return to heteromasculine military readiness and the possibility of romantic (heterosexual) love.

Upon first entering the avatar body, Jake rips off his monitoring cables and jubilantly sprints through the Pandora forest, relishing the sensation of running that he has been unable to access in his human form since his spinal cord injury. Thus, his first journey into Pandora represents a smugly celebrated freedom from disability, a point underscored by the dramatic visual attention given to his first run with his “new” legs.

While the other scientists struggle with their anthropological study of the Na’vi, it is Jake who gains entry into the group by means of a seemingly mystical blessing from the forest. When Neytiri first spots Jake, she raises her bow and arrow to kill him, but stops when a glowing white seedling gently drifts down into the frame: Something about him is different.

Somehow, we are shown, he is sacred. Sure enough, after their first discussion, the seedlings overwhelm Jake’s body as he holds his long, blue arms outstretched in a divine Christ-pose. It is an image steeped in paternalism: at last, the white, able-bodied savior has arrived.

In addition to his shift toward able-bodiedness, Jake also experiences a racial transformation. Over the course of the film, he undergoes a series of rites of passage that incorporate him in the Na’vi. He learns to hunt, is given ceremonial induction into the tribe, and beds down with Neytiri. While this romanticized pattern of “going native” is hardly new (see, for example, the Kevin Costner film Dances with Wolves ), his permanent transfer into the avatar body adds an unsettlingly literal level to the process of shedding whiteness.

Jake’s love affair with Neytiri ritualizes through sex a process that bell hooks has termed “eating the Other.” For hooks, intimate contact with racialized Others often figures as a way to assuage the guilt of the colonizer and to bypass the thorny issues of domination by trying to actually become the Other (25).

  • Since the biotechnology of Jake’s avatar actually makes this physically possible, Avatar manages to extend this cultural phenomenon to the level of corporeal spectacle.
  • As Jake makes himself over as Other, he is shown to be shedding the guilt of his role of colonizer, but not necessarily the privileges ascribed to it.

As the film nears its climax, Jake becomes the military leader of the Na’vi as they wage war on Colonel Quartich’s imperial forces. During the showdown, Quartich calls Jake out on his race traitor ways: “Hey, Sully, how does it feel to betray your own race? You think you’re one of them?Time to wake up.” Quartich then turns from Jake’s avatar and proceeds to smash open the (human) Jake’s avatar chamber, exposing the Jake’s human body to the poisonous atmosphere of Pandora.

Although Jake is unable to reach the oxygen mask, he is quickly rescued by Neytiri, who slays Quartich and revives Jake, cradling him in her arms. In this scene, disability switches Jake from the enactor of paternalism to its recipient. However, this temporary reversal is short-lived, as the Na’vi reward Jake’s bravery with permanent assignment to his Na’vi body — and concomitant able-bodiedness — as the pathway to full acceptance into their community.

Compulsory able-bodiedness is not only central to the narrative of Avatar, but was also a key part of its production. Although there is not a single frame in which Jake Sully’s human body walks, an ambulatory actor (Worthington) was nevertheless cast.

  • To provide the appearance of a paraplegic’s atrophied legs, director James Cameron commissioned the production of prosthetic legs for Worthington, and post-production, digitally edited out any trace of the actor’s actual legs.
  • The special effects team, Legendary Effects, created these prosthetic legs by casting the legs of an actual paraplegic man.

This tortuous process of special effects and additional effort demonstrates quite dramatically the extent to which compulsory able-bodiedness is always defined by the presence of disability.

  • hooks, bell. Black Looks: Race and Representation, Boston, MA: South End Press.1992. Print.
  • McRuer, Robert. “Compulsory Able-Bodiedness and Queer/Disabled Existence.” The Disability Studies Reader, Ed. Lennard J. Davis.3rd ed. New York: Routledge, 2010.383-392. Print.
  • Stamberg, Susan. “Belief On The Big Screen: Secrets Of Special Effects.” National Public Radio,5 Mar.2010. Web.12 Dec.2010.

Despite extensive efforts, I was not able to locate the name of the sit-in whose body was copied in the process of digitally creating Jake Sully’s legs. National Public Radio correspondent Susan Stamberg describes him in a curious sentence: “They found a Sam -sized young man — whose paralysis didn’t stop him from playing basketball — and made a cast of his legs.” Apparently it was more important to Stamberg to marvel at this man’s physical abilities than to mention his name. Her statement presents disability as an obstacle to be overcome and it is precisely this kind of perception that perpetuates compulsory able-bodiedness.

: Old, New, Borrowed and Blue: Compulsory Able-bodiedness and Whiteness in Avatar | Disability Studies Quarterly

How does Jake survive Avatar?

The Final Battle – 3D Version: red/cyan, cross-eyed Jake gathers all of the Na’vi clans Jake rallies the Omatikaya clan, and they ride with him as he flies out to gather all the clans for a final attack, just as the previous Toruk Makto did. Jake later makes tsaheylu with the Tree of Souls and asks Eywa to look into Grace’s memories and see how humans destroyed Earth, and to intervene to keep them from destroying Pandora as well.

Neytiri overhears him and tells him that Eywa does not take sides, she only maintains the balance of life on Pandora. Surveying the Na’vi with satellites, Quaritch learns that other clans have converged with the Omatikaya at the Tree of Souls and decides to destroy them and their holy ground to put an end to their defiance once and for all.

A huge military fleet commandeered by Quaritch approaches the Tree of Souls, using the Valkyrie shuttle as a makeshift bomber and mining explosives as “daisy cutter” munitions to destroy the tree. Thousands of Na’vi warriors led by Jake and Tsu’tey take to the skies and attack the fleet, while Norm rides with the cavalry on the ground.

The Na’vi forces on the ground are easily defeated by human infantry and their powerful AMP suits and suffer heavy losses. In the skies, a massive air battle ensues between the human air fleet and Na’vi hunters riding banshees. The Na’vi inflict some casualties on the humans with their initial strike, managing to take down several human gunships.

However, the humans’ superior firepower sees them inflict heavier casualties on the Na’vi, and they look to resume their bombing run. Quaritch, flying in his Dragon Gunship, notices Jake’s toruk and gives chase. Before Quaritch manages to shoot him down, Trudy dives in with her Samson and strafes the Dragon.

Quaritch turns his attention to her, which allows Jake to escape. Trudy fights back, but her Samson is no match for Quaritch’s gunship, and she is shot down and killed. Tsu’tey boards the Valkyrie in the hope of preventing it from dropping its payload, but after killing or incapacitating several humans inside the Valkyrie’s cargo bay, he is gunned down by a human soldier and falls from the shuttle.

Jake calls both Tsu’tey and Trudy but neither answer. He makes contact with Neytiri, who, with her ikran dead, is getting ready to attack the RDA ground forces single-handedly. Jake pleads with her over the communication collar not to, but before she tries; a stampede of hammerhead titanotheres attacks the RDA ground forces, trampling infantry and smashing AMP suits, followed by viperwolves.

  1. Neytiri is further surprised when one of Pandora’s deadliest creatures, a thanator, allows her to make tsaheylu with it and ride it.
  2. The human ground forces break and retreat in panic.
  3. In the skies, swarms of wild ikran descend on the surviving RDA gunships, pulling the craft off balance and ripping door gunners out of their stations until only the Valkyrie and Quaritch’s Dragon Gunship remain.

The Valkyrie, approaching the Tree of Souls, prepares to drop its payload, but in the ensuing confusion created by the wild ikran attack, Jake leaps onto the Valkyrie, throwing a grenade into one of its engines before it can drop its payload of mining explosives.

  1. The grenade detonates, causing the Valkyrie to collide with a nearby rock, shearing of the left wing and sending the it into a steep dive.
  2. The pilots are unable to compensate for the lost of thrust and the ship crashes into the ground and explodes.
  3. With all RDA ships except Quaritch’s destroyed or in retreat, Jake attempts to destroy the Dragon Gunship the same way he destroyed the Valkyrie.

Seeing Jake land on the gunship before he manages to throw his two grenades, Quaritch turns the ship sharply to starboard, nearly throwing Jake off. One grenade is lodged in a small air vent and detonates, ripping a hole in the Dragon’s armor, resulting in a few hydraulic-based control failures and exposes the interior crew to Pandoran atmosphere.

  • The falling Jake manages to grab onto one of the Dragon’s missile racks.
  • Jake pulls a missile off of the rack and heaves it into the rotor blades of the Dragon’s front starboard engine.
  • The resulting explosion destroys the engine and sends the Dragon into an uncontrollable spin.
  • Jake falls from the ship and lands safely in the jungle, breaking his fall with the huge leaves on the trees.

Quaritch also escapes his gunship, manning his personal AMP suit and jumping from the ship’s cargo bay, fully intent on making a one-man assault on the Tree of Souls. 3D Version: red/cyan, cross-eyed Jake turns against Quaritch Stumbling upon the camp containing the avatar link units by chance, Quaritch attempts to destroy Jake’s human body, but before he can do so, Neytiri and her thanator attack him, successfully destroying the GAU-90 cannon for Quaritch’s AMP suit.

However, Quaritch overpowers and kills the thanator with his AMP suit knife, As he prepares to kill Neytiri, pinned under the thanator’s body, Jake arrives to challenge him. The two fight fiercely in close quarters. Jake uses the rifle bayonet for the GAU-90 to fend off the blows of Quaritch’s AMP suit.

Jake manages to break the AMP suit knife and destroys the AMP’s glass canopy, but Quaritch puts on an exopack. The Colonel taunts Jake, asking him how it feels to betray his own race, before turning and attacking the avatar link unit with the suit. Jake manages to fend off Quaritch before he can fully break open the camp, but a window is broken, which allows Pandoran air into the link units. 3D Version: red/cyan, cross-eyed Neytiri seeing Jake in his human body for the first time She then tries to wake Jake’s avatar, to no avail, while Jake struggles inside the link unit to grab an emergency rebreather. Finally remembering that he is a human, she rushes into the link unit and places an exopack on Jake’s now-unconscious human body, saving him again.

As Jake wakes up, he says “I See you” to Neytiri and gently strokes her cheek. Neytiri repeats it back to him; the greeting now takes on new meaning as she is seeing and talking to Jake’s human body for the first time. After reconnecting to his avatar, Jake and Neytiri are brought to Tsu’tey, mortally wounded, by a group of surviving Na’vi warriors.

Tsu’tey passes leadership of the Omatikaya clan to Jake and requests that he end his suffering. Jake is reluctant, but is assured by Tsu’tey that he will be remembered, as Toruk Makto will be his last shadow, and honors Jake by calling him a brother. Jake remorsefully euthanizes Tsu’tey and recites a prayer for him. 3D Version: red/cyan, cross-eyed Mo’at transferring Jake’s mind into his avatar Having put an end to the RDA’s occupation of Pandora, Jake makes his last log entry on August 24, 2154, explaining that the humans were sent back to Earth by the Na’vi, except for a few (the scientists of the avatar program), and that he has decided to stay in his avatar form permanently.

Why didn t Neytiri shoot Jake?

Meeting Jake Sully ( Avatar: Tsu’tey’s Path & Avatar ) – Two years later in 2154, shortly before meeting Jake Sully, Neytiri is meditating at the Tree of Souls with her parents and Tsu’tey. After reflecting, Tsu’tey is excused and leaves to join his group, but Mo’at orders Neytiri, much to her annoyance, to stay, as a Tsahìk is always listening for the will of Eywa. 3D Version: red/cyan, cross-eyed Neytiri reprimands Jake Sully in the forest She continues to follow the avatar because of this symbol. When the avatar is attacked by a pack of viperwolves, she protects him by fending off the creatures. The avatar, whose name is Jake Sully, tries to thank her for the assistance, but Neytiri angrily rejects him as she was forced to needlessly kill three of the viperwolves to protect him.