Asked By: Neil Foster Date: created: Dec 08 2023

Is Just Stop Oil the same as Extinction Rebellion

Answered By: Devin Clark Date: created: Dec 08 2023

History – The key differences in the group’s tactics are rooted in their history. Greenpeace is a multi-issue organisation. JSO focuses solely on stopping oil, through pressuring the Government to cease fossil fuel licensing and production, “We have been doing this for 50 years.

We’re old-timers,” says Ami McCarthy, a political campaigner at Greenpeace UK. “We haven’t been the same tactics as other people have recently. We have a slightly different approach so I guess that’s why we’re not featured as much in press.” It was founded in Canada, in 1971, by Irving and Dorothy Stowe, who were opposed to a planned American nuclear weapon test underneath the Alaskan island of Amchitka, and attempted to sail there to try and stop it in a fishing boat called The Greenpeace.

By the mid-1990s, they were taking on some of the world’s biggest companies over pollution, including Shell. Just Stop Oil was founded in 2022 by Roger Hallam, who also co-founded Extinction Rebellion in 2018 and Insulate Britain in 2021. Formed in the same single-issue mould, the group has always focussed on banning new fossil fuel developments.

Who is funding climate activists?

CEF itself relies on funding from individuals, family offices and foundations. In 2022, more than 2,000 donors supported the group, including Disney heir and activist Abigail Disney and actor Jeremy Strong, who plays Kendall Roy on Succession, according to its annual report.

What has snooker got to do with Just Stop Oil?

Why did Just Stop Oil protest at the snooker game? – Just Stop Oil says it protested at the World Snooker Championship to urge UK sporting institutions “to join in civil resistance against the Government’s genocidal policies”. The group is demanding that the Government stop all new UK fossil fuel projects.

Margaret Reid, 52, a former museum professional from Kendal, said in a statement released by Just Stop Oil : “I did not take this action lightly, but I cannot remain a passive spectator while our Government knowingly pushes us down a path to destruction. “They are giving handouts of £236 million per week of our money, to the most profitable industry on earth, during a cost of living crisis.

I can no longer justify watching from the sidelines.” She added: “I am angry and heartbroken that I have found myself in a position where taking this sort of disruptive action is the only way to get heard.” Meanwhile, Eddie Whittingham, 25, a student at the University of Exeter, said: “I don’t want to be disrupting something that people enjoy, but we’re facing an extremely grave situation.

Asked By: Gerld Powell Date: created: Feb 25 2024

Who is behind the climate emergency fund

Answered By: Sebastian Perry Date: created: Feb 26 2024

Background – Climate Emergency Fund was founded in 2019 2 by investor Trevor Neilson and Rory Kennedy, a daughter of former U.S. Senator Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY). It received a $500,000 seed grant from oil heiress Aileen Getty. https://www.climateemergencyfund.org/press/chronicle-of-philanthropy/2019-07-12,” title=”” aria-describedby=”qtip-2″> 3

Asked By: Ashton Edwards Date: created: Jul 10 2023

Why invest in CEF

Answered By: Albert Wilson Date: created: Jul 11 2023

After the IPO, there are only 5 ways to increase capital within the portfolio –

  1. Making sound investment choices that appreciate and thus increase the net asset value
  2. Issuing debt, thereby leveraging the fund
  3. Issuing preferred shares, thereby leveraging the fund
  4. Conducting a secondary share offering (selling new shares to the public)
  5. Conducting a rights offering (giving existing shareholders the right to invest more capital into the fund in proportion to their existing ownership)
  1. Distributions to shareholders
  2. Poor investment decisions
  3. A tender offer to repurchase shares, which is a method to control discounts
  4. For leveraged funds only, forced sales to remain in compliance of leverage limits
  5. The liquidation of the fund

So, because capital does not flow freely into and out of CEFs, they are referred to as “closed-end” funds. The “closed-end” structure gives rise to discounts and premiums. After the IPO, a CEF’s shares trade on the open market, typically on an exchange, and the market itself determines the share price.

  • The result is that the share price typically does not match the net asset value of the fund’s underlying holdings.
  • Net asset value = (fund assets – fund liabilities)/shares outstanding) If the share price is higher than the net asset value, shares are said to be trading at a “premium.” This is typically portrayed as a “positive discount,” although mathematically that is counterintuitive.

For instance, a fund trading at a 2% premium would be shown as “+2%.” If the share price is less than the net asset value, the shares are said to be trading at a “discount.” This is typically portrayed with a minus sign, “-2%.”

  • Unlike with open-end mutual funds, a closed-end fund manager does not face reinvestment risk from daily share issuance.
  • A closed-end fund manager does not have to hold excess cash to meet redemptions.
  • Because there is no need to raise cash quickly to meet unexpected redemptions, the capital is considered to be more stable than in open-end funds. It is a stable capital base.

The relatively stable capital base, in turn, gives rise to 2 other attributes: First, it makes CEFs a good structure for investing in illiquid securities, such as emerging-markets stocks, municipal bonds, etc. The higher risk involved with investing in illiquid securities could translate into higher returns to shareholders.

Second, regulators allow the funds to issue debt and preferred shares, with strict limits on leverage. The fund can issue debt in an amount up to 50% of its net assets. Another way to look at this is that for every $1 of debt, the fund must have $3 of assets (including the assets from the debt). This is commonly referred to as a 33% leverage limit.

The fund can issue preferred shares in an amount up to 100% of its net assets. Another way to look at this is that for every $1 of preferred shares issued, the fund must have $2 of assets (including the assets from the preferred shares). This is commonly referred to as a 50% leverage limit.

Asked By: William Robinson Date: created: Jan 04 2024

What is CEF funding

Answered By: Gavin Collins Date: created: Jan 07 2024

Connecting Europe Facility The Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) is a key EU funding instrument to promote growth, jobs and competitiveness through targeted infrastructure investment at European level. It supports the development of high performing, sustainable and efficiently interconnected trans-European networks in the fields of transport, energy and digital services.

CEF investments fill the missing links in Europe’s energy, transport and digital backbone. The CEF benefits people across all Member States, as it makes travel easier and more sustainable, it enhances Europe’s energy security while enabling wider use of renewables, and it facilitates cross-border interaction between public administrations, businesses and citizens.

The CEF is divided into three sectors: One of the key priorities of CEF is enabling and strengthening the synergies between the three sectors. Actions across sectors may enable costs or results to be optimised through the pooling of financial, technical or human resources, thus enhancing the effectiveness of EU funding.

Did Just Stop Oil destroy paintings?

In the lead-up to Christmas, the climate action group Just Stop Oil is expected to disrupt life in London to draw attention to their cause. Their tactics range from scaling bridges to gluing themselves to busy roads to defacing famous paintings. It’s a form of nonviolent protest that’s heavily reliant on shock value and has drawn the ire of UK Prime Minister Rishi Sunak and his government, who have vowed to crack down on disruptive climate protests.

  1. While most protesters who’ve been arrested have been released on bail after a relatively short period, the sharpest legal response has come in the form of a new Public Order Bill, which would punish the act of gluing oneself to objects or buildings, or blocking transport by six months in prison.
  2. Rights groups have regarded the bill as authoritarian and regressive, but a UK government spokesperson told Vox that it served the interests of the public.

“The right to protest is a fundamental principle of our democracy,” the spokesperson said, “but those protesters that disrupt public life, delay our emergency services, and drain police resources cost the taxpayer millions and must face proper penalties.” Just Stop Oil protesters being detained by London police in October 2022. Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images Just Stop Oil came on the world’s radar last fall when two activists, Phoebe Plummer and Anna Holland, threw tomato soup at van Gogh’s Sunflowers in London’s National Gallery of Art.

The painting, which is encased in glass, wasn’t harmed, but the gallery said the frame suffered minor damage. The use of tomato soup might seem absurd — after all, the group is trying to make a point about the harmful effects of oil on the climate, so why not deface the painting with fuel or even petroleum jelly? But the group’s spokesperson, Emma Brown, told Vox’s Today, Explained that the soup was a nod to Britain’s cost-of-living crisis, which has resulted in the proliferation of food banks around the country, where tomato soup is a staple product but often too expensive to heat up.

“We wanted that dramatic, slightly bizarre protest,” Brown said of throwing soup on van Gogh’s beloved painting. “Because by targeting something that is precious and valuable, the people feel a sense of shock and discomfort when they see that being threatened.

That is really the emotion that we need to be feeling when we are seeing the decisions our governments are making and the devastation being wreaked by the climate catastrophe.” Time will tell whether Just Stop Oil’s protests will help save the planet, but their tactics are not new. Art destruction in the name of political or social change can be traced back to the dawn of time, according to David Freedberg, who wrote the 1989 book The Power of Images, which is often cited by art historians studying the use of images for propaganda, pleasure, and destruction.

“Obviously, they will draw attention to the cause. They may make some people reflect more on the problem of oil and fossil fuels,” said Freedberg in an interview with Today, Explained host Noel King. “But it’s really not clear to me that it’s going to achieve very much.” Below is an excerpt of the conversation between Freedberg and King, edited for length and clarity.

When did Just Stop Oil throw soup?

“What is worth more, art or life?” This question — and what would normally be an obvious answer — got a lot more complicated on October 14 when two protesters for the climate activism group Just Stop Oil threw tomato soup on Vincent van Gogh’s “Sunflowers” at London’s National Gallery. Immediately after the stunt, the protesters challenged onlookers with this query. “Is it worth more than food? Worth more than justice?” the protester continued, “Are you more concerned about the protection of a painting, or the protection of our planet and people?” Just Stop Oil made international headlines for this incident, with the onslaught of publicity leading to more attention than the group had ever before received. Yet much of the media and public attention was negative, with many questioning the efficacy of the protest and criticizing the protesters for hurting their own cause. By jeopardizing one of the most beloved works of art in the world, the group had obscured and overshadowed its actual message. True, millions of people were hearing about Just Stop Oil for the first time, but it was now likely in the context that reckless protesters had ruined van Gogh’s “Sunflowers” just to make a point. But the protesters hadn’t ruined van Gogh’s “Sunflowers.” The painting, enclosed by glass, was completely unharmed; the National Gallery later confirmed that only the frame had been slightly damaged and that the protesters had been arrested. Still, the real damage — to the urgent cause of battling the oil industry in the fight to save the planet — seemed to have been done. “Throwing soup at paintings won’t save the climate,” ran a typical media response, while TikTok immediately memed conspiracy theories that the protesters were actually hired by the oil industry to turn the public against oil protests. Multiple friends I spoke with following the incident had only heard that “Sunflowers” had been targeted, not that the painting was just fine. And few media write-ups even bothered to mention Just Stop Oil’s ultimate goal: to halt new oil licensing across Great Britain. So: Was it a successful protest? When I heard that the painting was unharmed, my reaction rapidly shifted from “This is horrifying” to “This might be the best protest ever.” At least, it’s one I’ll be thinking about for a long time to come. These kinds of protests are perhaps having a moment; on October 23, the German environmentalist group Last Generation threw mashed potatoes on one of the paintings in Monet’s famous “Haystacks” series at the Museum Barberini in Potsdam. The artwork sold for a record $110 million in 2019. As with the van Gogh protest, the painting was enclosed behind glass, and the museum later confirmed it was unharmed. “If it takes a painting, to make society remember that the fossil fuel course is killing us all,” the group later tweeted, “Then we’ll give you #MashedPotatoes on a painting!” There’s a huge difference between a climate protest that destroys art in the name of saving the planet and a climate protest that threatens the destruction of art but doesn’t actually go through with it. The former treats the art and the cultural value we ascribe to it as incidental in the fight to save the planet, ignoring that a civilization without art is an incredible loss. The second kind of protest, however, raises all kinds of questions in the absence of actual destruction. What would it have meant if we had lost “Sunflowers”? Such an act would have generated a period of international collective mourning, a unified sense of loss that no amount of urgency over the climate crisis has been able to equal. But what could the loss of one great painting — the reported $81 million value of which derives not only from its beauty and historical import but from the deeply subjective and often-fraught methods of the art market — mean to a civilization that doesn’t exist? The prospect of that loss, averted, allows us to seriously confront the degree to which we as a society collectively dismiss and downplay climate change. One reason for this might be the sheer scope of the crisis: It’s so huge it’s almost impossible to fully wrap our heads around — the planetary version of one death versus a million deaths, It’s hard to look head-on at the real destruction climate change is already causing, and even harder to know how to make meaningful changes individually while battling climate anxiety, That can all lead to dismissiveness. Serious reports of climate change often get misinterpreted and misunderstood, leading to more confusion and less clarity on what the real stakes are. Media depictions of individuals who confront the climate crisis — think S-Town or First Reformed — capture their desperation in ways that border on frightening. Such narratives use climate change to provoke a personal existential crisis, framing their subjects as mentally disturbed or perhaps just obsessed with the apocalypse. This stereotype carried over to reality when, on April 22 (Earth Day) of this year, the longtime climate activist Wynn Bruce died by self-immolation on the steps of the Supreme Court, in a final act of protest. The media, when it wasn’t ignoring Bruce’s death, portrayed him as mentally and emotionally unstable. Meanwhile, Just Stop Oil, formed at the beginning of 2022, had been ramping up its protests for months. The group emerged from a cloud of controversy over the inflammatory climate activism group Extinction Rebellion (XR). XR’s founder, Roger Hallam, came under fire in 2019 after an interview published in Der Spiegel in which he compared climate change to the Holocaust and repeated a watered-down version of his extremist talking points, suggesting elites were withholding climate action as a form of maintaining power and predicting that the climate crisis would lead to mass rape. Hallam was accused of cultivating a “death cult” mentality about the climate crisis among XR members. But Just Stop Oil, begun by Hallam as a coalition of different activist groups, touts the more optimistic goal of taking its message directly to the oil industry. The group had generated reams of negative press for blocking traffic in actions across the UK and Europe. In April, a week before Bruce died, one Just Stop Oil protester went viral for an interview with Good Morning Britain which strongly resembled the parody dramedy Don’t Look Up, In the interview, protester Miranda Whelehan attempted to focus on recent calls for strong, swift climate action — specifically a report released earlier in the month from the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change which called for “now or never” urgency to reduce global energy emissions. Instead, the pundits spent the interview deriding her and her fellow activists, criticizing them for blocking traffic and calling the crusade “playgroundish.” “My fear is that they will only understand the reality of the climate crisis when it is on the doorstep,” Whelehan wrote later, “perhaps when the floodwater is uncontrollably trickling into their homes, or when they can no longer find food in the supermarkets.” Just Stop Oil has been ramping up the creativity of its protests as well, taking to the astroturf to briefly interrupt Formula One racing events and, in June, creating a climate-apocalypse version of “The Hay Wain,” by 19th-century English painter John Constable, and draping it over the original, This protest, also in the National Gallery, saw multiple activists gluing themselves to multiple paintings in the gallery, and seems in retrospect like a trial run for the big event with “Sunflowers.” Once again, the Constable painting was undamaged. More importantly, all of these actions on the part of Just Stop Oil have been peaceful — disruptive but not harmful. And up until the van Gogh protest, little of it has generated much public interest or sympathy. Just curious about the appropriate tactics, because if the tomato soup idea was silly and alienating, and setting yourself on fire isn’t enough, and lawmakers criminalize protests, and blocking traffic is inconvenient, and books about activism get banned, what are the options? — derecka (@dereckapurnell) October 15, 2022 In their quest to level up effective protesting, why did Just Stop Oil turn to art? Why involve one of the most famous paintings in the world — and what does it say about the relationship of art to modern consumerism that this one protest garnered more attention than all of their other protests combined? The connection between art and political protest has a long history; as Jezebel noted after last week’s protest, “Destroying art is its own genre of political theater.” In 1913-14, numerous British suffragists destroyed or vandalized multiple paintings, including Velasquez’s famous nude “Rokeby Venus,” in response to the government’s attempt to suppress the work of their leader, Emmeline Pankhurst. Their logic was that if the government was going to destroy women, they would destroy art depicting women: “You can get another picture, but you cannot get a life,” one of the suffragists told the press. In 2012, a man went to prison for punching a hole in a Monet (the painting was repaired ) in a vague protest against “the state;” earlier this year, an individual smeared cake across the glassed-in “Mona Lisa” (a frequent targe t of politically motivated attacks) in another climate protest. The implied or actual destruction of art has also been a political weapon, most notably during World War II, when Nazis destroyed or lost major artworks during the systematic looting of art across Europe. The collective cultural value of that lost and looted artwork is inestimable, but the subjective nature of art means that fixing a value on individual artworks can feel slippery and arbitrary. For example, in 2013, a John Constable painting sold for $5,200 only to sell again two years later for $5.2 million, Art increasingly has become a convenient form of exploitation; the contemporary art scene is teeming with fraudsters, forgers, and money-laundering schemes, with buzzy art generating astronomical sales at auctions, All of this can make the buying and selling of art feel more like a con game and less like a reverent process of preservation. Artists like Banksy have built their careers on challenging the relationship between art and consumerism, questioning at what point art begins to have meaning and monetary value and at what point it starts to feel like a grift, sold to you in, say, the form of a $50 million balloon dog, When Banksy half-shredded his famous “Balloon Girl” in 2018, he did it as a way of calling out empty consumerism, while also knowingly participating in the consumerist game, with his work immediately increasing in value because of his prank. More recently, in September, a Mexican NFT investor allegedly set a $10 million painting by Frida Kahlo on fire in a scheme to increase its value as a digital asset. Such stunts reveal how mercurial our cultural reverence for art can be: In one context, art becomes an incendiary political weapon; in another, even its destruction is just another route to make a profit. In light of all this, throwing tomato soup on a protected, glassed-in copy of “Sunflowers” — one of the world’s most expensive paintings — seems like a counteractive to the exploitative excesses of art culture. Does a burning Frida Kahlo drawing matter more to us than a self-immolating climate activist? Why not put that juxtaposition into even starker relief: Does the immediate destruction of a van Gogh matter more to us than the destruction of all life? This seems to be the ultimate utility of throwing tomato soup on van Gogh’s “Sunflowers”: not to grab attention or cause mayhem, but to activate our love of art, our sense of wonder and awe and reverence. The earlier art protest didn’t work in the same way because few works of art evoke the same instant universal emotional response as “Sunflowers.” The shock and dismay you may have felt when you heard “Sunflowers” might be damaged is all of a piece with the way you grieved when you heard that Notre Dame was on fire, If you can mourn the prospect of losing these beloved cultural artifacts, you will perhaps mourn, too, when you learn that on average, overall animal populations have declined by two-thirds over the last half-century, a warning sign of ecosystems in peril. Or you will hopefully really internalize the reality that 2025 is the absolute latest year we can continue to increase global energy emissions if we want to cap global warming at 2ºC and thus hopefully stave off planetary destruction. Apollo 9 astronaut Russell “Rusty” Schweickart, who performed the first Apollo series space walk, once memorably described his five minutes spent contemplating the earth from space: “You realize that on that small spot is everything that means anything to you,” he wrote : “All history, all poetry, all music, all art, death, birth, love, tears, all games, all joy — all on that small spot.” These, at last, are the real stakes: an artistic masterpiece now — or everything that inspires artists to create in the first place. Update, October 24, 10:20 am ET: This story was originally published on October 20 and has been updated, most recently to include mention of another climate art protest in which mashed potatoes were put on a Monet. \r\n \r\n vox-mark \r\n \r\n \r\n \r\n \r\n \r\n “,”cross_community”:false,”groups”:,”internal_groups”:,”image”:,”bounds”:,”uploaded_size”:,”focal_point”:null,”image_id”:71521441,”alt_text”:””},”hub_image”:,”bounds”:,”uploaded_size”:,”focal_point”:null,”image_id”:71521441,”alt_text”:””},”lede_image”:,”bounds”:,”uploaded_size”:,”focal_point”:null,”image_id”:71521443,”alt_text”:””},”group_cover_image”:null,”picture_standard_lead_image”:,”bounds”:,”uploaded_size”:,”focal_point”:null,”image_id”:71521443,”alt_text”:””,”picture_element”:,”alt”:””,”default”:,”art_directed”:}},”image_is_placeholder”:false,”image_is_hidden”:false,”network”:”vox”,”omits_labels”:false,”optimizable”:false,”promo_headline”:”How many van Goghs is one Earth worth? “,”recommended_count”:0,”recs_enabled”:false,”slug”:”culture/23414590/just-stop-oil-van-gogh-sunflowers-protest-climate-change”,”dek”:”We’re still contemplating the thorny brilliance of throwing soup on Sunflowers.”,”homepage_title”:”How many van Goghs is one Earth worth? “,”homepage_description”:”We’re still contemplating the thorny brilliance of throwing soup on Sunflowers.”,”show_homepage_description”:false,”title_display”:”How many van Goghs is one Earth worth? “,”pull_quote”:null,”voxcreative”:false,”show_entry_time”:true,”show_dates”:true,”paywalled_content”:false,”paywalled_content_box_logo_url”:””,”paywalled_content_page_logo_url”:””,”paywalled_content_main_url”:””,”article_footer_body”:”One of our core beliefs here at Vox is that everyone needs and deserves access to the information that helps them understand the world, regardless of whether they can pay for a subscription. With the 2024 election on the horizon, more people are turning to us for clear and balanced explanations of the issues and policies at stake. We’re so grateful that we’re on track to hit 85,000 contributions to the Vox Contributions program before the end of the year, which in turn helps us keep this work free. We need to add 2,500 contributions this month to hit that goal.\r\n Will you make a contribution today to help us hit this goal and support our policy coverage? Any amount helps. “,”article_footer_header”:”We’re here to shed some clarity”,”use_article_footer”:true,”article_footer_cta_annual_plans”:”,\r\n,\r\n,\r\n \r\n ]\r\n}”,”article_footer_cta_button_annual_copy”:”year”,”article_footer_cta_button_copy”:”Yes, I’ll give”,”article_footer_cta_button_monthly_copy”:”month”,”article_footer_cta_default_frequency”:”monthly”,”article_footer_cta_monthly_plans”:”,\r\n,\r\n,\r\n \r\n ]\r\n}”,”article_footer_cta_once_plans”:”,\r\n,\r\n,\r\n \r\n ]\r\n}”,”use_article_footer_cta_read_counter”:true,”use_article_footer_cta”:true,”featured_placeable”:false,”video_placeable”:false,”disclaimer”:null,”volume_placement”:”lede”,”video_autoplay”:false,”youtube_url”:”http://bit.ly/voxyoutube”,”facebook_video_url”:””,”play_in_modal”:true,”user_preferences_for_privacy_enabled”:false,”show_branded_logos”:true}”> We’re here to shed some clarity One of our core beliefs here at Vox is that everyone needs and deserves access to the information that helps them understand the world, regardless of whether they can pay for a subscription. With the 2024 election on the horizon, more people are turning to us for clear and balanced explanations of the issues and policies at stake. We’re so grateful that we’re on track to hit 85,000 contributions to the Vox Contributions program before the end of the year, which in turn helps us keep this work free. We need to add 2,500 contributions this month to hit that goal. Will you make a contribution today to help us hit this goal and support our policy coverage? Any amount helps. $5 /month $10 /month $25 /month $50 /month Other Yes, I’ll give $5 /month Yes, I’ll give $5 /month We accept credit card, Apple Pay, and Google Pay. You can also contribute via

Asked By: Logan Walker Date: created: Jan 22 2024

Why are oil activists protesting

Answered By: Fred Bailey Date: created: Jan 22 2024

What protesters want, explained – Protesters have demanded that President Joe Biden, the United Nations, and corporations stop federal approvals for fossil fuel projects, phase out drilling on public land, and halt dirty energy investments abroad. Activists are trying to push vested financial and political interests into reining in fossil fuel production, the primary cause of climate change,

  • Environmental groups have traditionally relied on a mix of pressing for change from the outside and reforming financial and government bodies from within, and protests are just a slice of the organizing that goes on to enact climate policy.
  • This week’s slate of events in New York — the protests, blockades, and demonstrations — are a show of the force that plans on pressing from the outside and a reminder that the clock is running.
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The demands from Sunday’s march include asking Biden to phase out oil and gas drilling on public lands, reject permits for new fossil fuel infrastructure, and halt oil and gas exports. Many of these demands are hard to deliver on, not only for political reasons but also because government leasing practices would probably require Congress to change.

The underlying moral argument here is that the world needs to stop building new fossil fuel infrastructure and begin to phase out coal, oil, and gas before the end of this decade to prevent the worst-case scenarios of global warming. Plus, gains in technology in recent years have made the transition away from extractive energy and toward renewable energy far more accessible.

There are a lot of complications in getting there, but many politicians and business leaders still don’t want to concede the basic point that it’s the energy industry that’s driving greenhouse emissions that are trapping heat in the Earth’s atmosphere.

Even during global climate conferences, the US and other oil-reliant countries have, as recently as last year, blocked language urging a phase-out of fossil fuels. The climate movement has also evolved on this. Since 2014, there have been almost-annual climate marches, and in that time the aim has shifted from simply trying to raise awareness about the climate crisis to demanding that the world stop burning and developing new fossil fuels.

Longtime organizer and climate journalist Bill McKibben says fossil fuels have always been a key focus of the movement, remembering when activists demanded President Obama “keep fossil fuels in the ground.” But he does think there’s a change in who’s taking notice.

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The notion is working its way up the food chain,” McKibben told Vox, pointing out that more US politicians are naming and shaming fossil fuel companies. That recently included California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s lawsuit against oil companies for climate deception, significant from the state that is the largest oil and gas consumer in the country.

But Biden is taking less notice of fossil fuels than activists would like. While his administration has passed a historic climate law, as Su explains, Biden himself “needs to also stop his expansion of fossil fuels.” Another example of Biden favoring the jobs-creation component of climate action is his announcement on Wednesday that his administration is moving ahead with a Civilian Conservation Corps, a green jobs program modeled after the original New Deal.

The clean energy economy may score political points, but it means little for climate change if the fossil fuel industry continues to expand. Indeed, oil and gas are expanding, despite the US’s commitments on climate change. The US set a new record for petroleum exports this year and is the biggest natural gas exporter in the world.

Oil companies are charting out big new expansions on public lands, including ConocoPhillips’ Willow Project in Alaska. You see this tension even in his speech to the UN General Assembly on Tuesday. Biden said his administration “has treated this crisis as an existential threat,” pointing to the Inflation Reduction Act ‘s “largest investment ever anywhere in the history of the world to combat the climate crisis and help move the global economy toward a clean energy future.” The law could get the US most of the way toward its goal of slashing climate pollution in half by 2030 from peak 2005 emissions, but its implementation will matter as much as whether those cuts are as large as promised.

And while $369 billion is a lot of money, it still comes up short of the downpayment needed to handle climate change’s impacts. Compare the seemingly large sum to what governments put into the fossil fuels industry just last year: Fossil fuel subsidies grew to a new record level worldwide, at $7 trillion, according to the International Monetary Fund,

Activists recognize the US won’t end its production or consumption of oil in a single day. But they’re staking out a position that phasing out our dependency needs to get underway aggressively, and every domestic policy — from the implementation of the IRA to Biden’s interpretation of his executive powers — should reflect the ultimate goal.

Asked By: Patrick Walker Date: created: Oct 06 2023

What happened to Just Stop Oil

Answered By: Joseph Jackson Date: created: Oct 07 2023

Why can’t police stop Just Stop Oil? – From motorists dragging protesters out of the road to irate online comments, Just Stop Oil’s intentionally disruptive tactics have left many members of the public asking why the police are not doing more to stop them.

However, police have been acting, and have arrested over 2,000 of the group’s activists. Policing Just Stop Oil’s protests has cost £18.5 million, home secretary Suella Braverman told the House of Commons, A pair of protesters were jailed for three years after scaling a bridge on the Dartford crossing in October 2022, and Just Stop Oil says three of its supporters are currently in prison.

The government has also given police further powers to tackle protests like Just Stop Oil’s. The Public Order Act, which passed this year, includes a number of new protest-related offences – such as criminalising locking on and obstructing major transport works.

Asked By: Jeremiah Rivera Date: created: Jan 09 2024

Why did Just Stop Oil throw soup

Answered By: John Perry Date: created: Jan 11 2024

Interview highlights – On why they joined Just Stop Oil and what the organization does I joined back in August, largely out of a sense of fear and despairing. I tried all the more traditional forms of activism, I guess you could say. I’ve written to, I’ve signed petitions, I’ve gone on marches.

  • I did all the things I felt I could do for the climate and eventually went vegan, stopped buying clothes firsthand.
  • And I was so frustrated that I saw it not going anywhere.
  • I saw it not making any meaningful change.
  • So I saw what Just Stop Oil was doing, and for the first time I felt a bit of hope that I could do something to secure myself a future.

Just Stop Oil started going out into action in April. And all through April, we went to the heart of the fossil fuel industry. We climbed up on tankers to stop them moving. We formed blocks in front of oil depots, so none of the tankers could come and leave.

  1. We had incredibly brave people dig tunnels under oil terminals, so the roads had to be closed off, and staying in these tunnels for weeks sometimes.
  2. We went to petrol stations and smashed up petrol pumps and destroyed the machines that are destroying us.
  3. Digging a tunnel under the road, so the person is essentially saying, “If you want to drive on this necessary road, you’re going to have to kill me?” Yeah, it risks the driver’s life, the tunneler’s life.

When did the group begin targeting museums and paintings? Since October, we have been engaging in disruptive acts all around London because right now what is missing to make this change is political will. So our action in particular was a media-grabbing action to get people talking, not just about what we did, but why we did it.

And what did you do? Me and my amazing friend Anna threw soup on the Vincent van Gogh sunflower painting. The two of you glued your hands to the wall. What did that feel like? Well, I’ve glued quite a few times, and people always ask me, “Doesn’t it hurt? Isn’t it uncomfortable?” It really isn’t. I mean, the police have this solvent that they use, which just de-bonds you from the wall.

It’s not painful at all. It seems like it’d be annoying, until they get you off, to be stuck on the wall. Yeah. Admittedly, we didn’t choose the most comfy positions, Why tomato soup? One, to grab people’s attention — it hasn’t been done before, and it was something new. But almost more importantly, to draw attention to the cost of living crisis. In the U.K., we are facing a horrendous cost of living crisis and it is part of the cost of oil crisis. Just Stop Oil protesters block the roads at a major intersection on Thursday in London, England, the latest in its series of public demonstrations. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images Just Stop Oil protesters block the roads at a major intersection on Thursday in London, England, the latest in its series of public demonstrations. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images What does Just Stop Oil want? So our demand is that the government immediately halts all new fossil fuel licenses.

  • In the U.K., we have eight years worth of oil in reserves, so those eight years need to be used to make a just and fair transition to a renewable future.
  • And that transition needs to include training for people who work in the fossil fuel industry currently.
  • There’s a lot of transferable skills so that they have job security in a renewable future.

It needs to include the insulation of British homes and it needs to include subsidized public transport. You understand, if you were to stop oil in a way that raised energy prices dramatically, it would harm the same low-income people that you want to help? Oh yeah, It seems you would need to build not just a momentary political majority, but a long-term political majority in favor of change. Yes, this is why Just Stop Oil uses these tactics of civil resistance, because history has shown us that civil resistance works.

I’m sitting here today as a queer person. And the reason I’m able to vote, I’m able to go to university, hopefully someday marry the person I love is because of people who have taken part in acts of civil resistance before me. How do you respond to people who may agree with your policies, but say that with with Russia’s war in Ukraine and energy prices, we need to make compromises? The fact is we don’t have any time to waste.

Last year, the former chief scientific adviser for the U.K., Sir David King, said that what we do in the next three to four years will determine the future of humanity, When are we going to start listening to the scientists? When are we going to wake up and realize that if we don’t act now, we are going to see catastrophic outcomes? The audio for this interview was edited by HJ Mai.

Asked By: Carter Flores Date: created: Mar 05 2024

Where did stop oil come from

Answered By: Luke Moore Date: created: Mar 08 2024

Who is “Just Stop Oil” and what do they want? What would you do if you knew that the planet is being wrecked for human civilization and that something could be done to save it? Would you act? Would you stand in traffic and demand action to save the planet? Would you vandalize great works of art in hope that this would bring attention to the crisis? It does seem like there is an astonishing amount of casual behavior about the climate crisis that has already created the hottest summer in recorded history.

  • Can you blame anyone for acting like this is an emergency or their belief that drastic action needs to be applied now to save the planet? That’s what Just Stop Oil is doing.
  • It is a British environmental activist group that was founded in February 2022.
  • The group’s goal is to get the British government to commit to ending new fossil fuel licensing and production.

The group uses civil resistance, direct action, vandalism, and traffic obstruction to achieve its goals. Just Stop Oil first came to attention in March 2022 after a series of protests, including pitch invasions at several Premier League football grounds.

The group also protested at English oil terminals in April 2022. There is this question: “Why is Just Stop Oil doing these disruptions?” But the best question might be: “Why aren’t more people also doing civil acts of disobedience?” The fate of the planet is at stake. Guest: James Harvey is with Just Stop Oil.

“The Source” is a live call-in program airing Mondays through Thursdays from 12-1 p.m. Leave a message before the program at (210) 615-8982. During the live show, call833-877-8255 or email [email protected]. *This interview will be recorded on Wednesday, August 2.

Who is the biggest funder of climate change?

Who are the top donors to climate adaptation? – In 2021, the largest donors of climate adaptation-related ODA (including both principal and significant funding) were Germany, France and Japan. Collectively, commitments from these three donors account for 71% of total bilateral climate change adaptation funding from all DAC countries.

Asked By: Bernard Watson Date: created: Apr 16 2023

Who is the largest funder of climate investment

Answered By: Cole Anderson Date: created: Apr 16 2023

A unique fund for humanity’s greatest challenge A unique fund for huma grea As the world’s largest climate fund, GCF accelerates transformative climate action in developing countries through a country-owned partnership approach and use of flexible financing solutions and climate investment expertise. News update

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Who is the biggest climate activist?

Who is the current climate activist? – Greta Thunberg, the name that is currently inspiring the entire world specially the younger generations to speak up against climate change is definitely this Swedish activist.

Asked By: Daniel Smith Date: created: Jan 15 2023

Is snooker corrupt

Answered By: Norman Henderson Date: created: Jan 16 2023

List of snooker players investigated for match-fixing Liang Wenbo (left) and Li Hang (right) received lifetime bans for match-fixing has seen corruption allegations since its inception as a professional sport. Professional player and commentator considered endemic to snooker, noting that he himself was offered a to throw a match.

  1. The earliest known case of corruption in the game involved, pioneer of the professional sport and winner of the first 15 world championships, who is believed to have “carried” weaker opponents in multi-session matches to maximise gate revenue.
  2. In 1968, published an article titled “Great TV Snooker Frame-up”, which exposed the fixing of non-tournament televised matches for “the artificial production of climaxes”.

Players,, and recounted how there had been an understanding that if they were playing a televised match, end with a, and that they would play in a way to ensure dramatic tension. Davis said that he regarded these matches as “five frames of comedy: I hate taking part in something that’s not genuine”.

Players have sometimes been coerced into fixing results. Thai players in particular have been targeted by cartels. once received a death threat as part of a match-fixing attempt, while was the victim of a firebomb attack on his Rotherham home after the governing body opened an investigation into him and fellow Thai player,

Match-fixing is difficult to prove. Only four arrests have taken place in the sport’s history—, and Scottish practice partners and —but no criminal prosecution has ever been brought. In 2022, the sport was rocked by the biggest scandal in its history when a match-fixing ring was unmasked, which led to ten Chinese players—,,,,,,,, and —being banned for match-fixing offences.

Why did Just Stop Oil disrupt snooker?

Just Stop Oil protester disrupts World Snooker Championship by throwing orange powder paint on table

  • A disrupted the World Snooker Championship on Monday by climbing onto the table and throwing a bag of orange powder paint over the playing surface.
  • Video footage shows the man – who was wearing a t-shirt – running from the crowd and leaping onto the table during the game between Robert Milkins and Joe Perry.
  • While kneeling on the table, he then managed to empty a pack of orange powder paint on the green surface before being bundled away by security.
  • At the same time, another protester could also be seen trying to disrupt the other game between Mark Allen and Fan Zhengyi, but she was stopped by the referee and quickly taken away by security.
  • Despite the incident lasting no more than a few seconds, the clean up operation took a while longer.
  • The game between Milkins and Perry was postponed until Tuesday as the table needed to be re-clothed, while the game between Allen and Fan restarted after a 40-minute delay.
  • group Just Stop Oil named the two activists as Margaret Reid, 52, and Eddie Whittingham, 25, and said the pair were “demanding” UK sporting institutions to “join in civil resistance” against the use of fossil fuels.
  • In a, the organization said the pair had been taken away by security and arrested.

In a statement sent to CNN on Tuesday, South Yorkshire Police said: “A 25-year-old man and a 52-year-old woman were arrested on suspicion of criminal damage. Both are in police custody.” “I have never seen that before at a snooker event. It’s a first,” former world champion and current pundit Stephen Hendry told the BBC during its coverage of the tournament.

  1. The World Snooker Championship is being played at the iconic Crucible Theater in Sheffield, UK, and is now the latest high-profile sporting event to be disrupted by activists.
  2. Saturday’s was also delayed after animal rights protesters managed to breach the security barriers and run onto the track.
  3. Police said more than 100 people were arrested as a result.

: Just Stop Oil protester disrupts World Snooker Championship by throwing orange powder paint on table

Why did Stephen Hendry give up snooker?

Retirement (2012–2020) – Hendry ensured he would make his 27th consecutive appearance at the main stage of the 2012 World Championship when he defeated Yu 10–6 in the qualifiers. He made a 147 in his 10–4 first-round defeat of Bingham, his third maximum break at the Crucible and the 11th of his career.

He defeated the defending champion Higgins 13–4 in the second round, his first victory over his compatriot in a ranking event since 2003, to reach his 19th world quarter-final. However, after losing 2–13 to Maguire in the quarter-finals, Hendry announced his retirement from professional snooker at the age of 43, citing dissatisfaction with his standard of play and difficulty balancing competitive, commercial, and personal commitments.

He stated that he had decided three months earlier to retire at the end of the season.

Asked By: Isaac Phillips Date: created: Nov 15 2023

Who funded the Climate Emergency Fund

Answered By: Ashton Powell Date: created: Nov 16 2023

Aileen Getty is the founding donor of Climate Emergency Fund. She is an heiress to the Getty family fortune established by oil magnate J. Paul Getty, who created the J. Paul Getty Trust before he passed away.

Why did Just Stop Oil throw soup?

Interview highlights – On why they joined Just Stop Oil and what the organization does I joined back in August, largely out of a sense of fear and despairing. I tried all the more traditional forms of activism, I guess you could say. I’ve written to, I’ve signed petitions, I’ve gone on marches.

  • I did all the things I felt I could do for the climate and eventually went vegan, stopped buying clothes firsthand.
  • And I was so frustrated that I saw it not going anywhere.
  • I saw it not making any meaningful change.
  • So I saw what Just Stop Oil was doing, and for the first time I felt a bit of hope that I could do something to secure myself a future.

Just Stop Oil started going out into action in April. And all through April, we went to the heart of the fossil fuel industry. We climbed up on tankers to stop them moving. We formed blocks in front of oil depots, so none of the tankers could come and leave.

We had incredibly brave people dig tunnels under oil terminals, so the roads had to be closed off, and staying in these tunnels for weeks sometimes. We went to petrol stations and smashed up petrol pumps and destroyed the machines that are destroying us. Digging a tunnel under the road, so the person is essentially saying, “If you want to drive on this necessary road, you’re going to have to kill me?” Yeah, it risks the driver’s life, the tunneler’s life.

When did the group begin targeting museums and paintings? Since October, we have been engaging in disruptive acts all around London because right now what is missing to make this change is political will. So our action in particular was a media-grabbing action to get people talking, not just about what we did, but why we did it.

And what did you do? Me and my amazing friend Anna threw soup on the Vincent van Gogh sunflower painting. The two of you glued your hands to the wall. What did that feel like? Well, I’ve glued quite a few times, and people always ask me, “Doesn’t it hurt? Isn’t it uncomfortable?” It really isn’t. I mean, the police have this solvent that they use, which just de-bonds you from the wall.

It’s not painful at all. It seems like it’d be annoying, until they get you off, to be stuck on the wall. Yeah. Admittedly, we didn’t choose the most comfy positions, Why tomato soup? One, to grab people’s attention — it hasn’t been done before, and it was something new. But almost more importantly, to draw attention to the cost of living crisis. In the U.K., we are facing a horrendous cost of living crisis and it is part of the cost of oil crisis. Just Stop Oil protesters block the roads at a major intersection on Thursday in London, England, the latest in its series of public demonstrations. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images Just Stop Oil protesters block the roads at a major intersection on Thursday in London, England, the latest in its series of public demonstrations. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images What does Just Stop Oil want? So our demand is that the government immediately halts all new fossil fuel licenses.

  1. In the U.K., we have eight years worth of oil in reserves, so those eight years need to be used to make a just and fair transition to a renewable future.
  2. And that transition needs to include training for people who work in the fossil fuel industry currently.
  3. There’s a lot of transferable skills so that they have job security in a renewable future.

It needs to include the insulation of British homes and it needs to include subsidized public transport. You understand, if you were to stop oil in a way that raised energy prices dramatically, it would harm the same low-income people that you want to help? Oh yeah, It seems you would need to build not just a momentary political majority, but a long-term political majority in favor of change. Yes, this is why Just Stop Oil uses these tactics of civil resistance, because history has shown us that civil resistance works.

  1. I’m sitting here today as a queer person.
  2. And the reason I’m able to vote, I’m able to go to university, hopefully someday marry the person I love is because of people who have taken part in acts of civil resistance before me.
  3. How do you respond to people who may agree with your policies, but say that with with Russia’s war in Ukraine and energy prices, we need to make compromises? The fact is we don’t have any time to waste.

Last year, the former chief scientific adviser for the U.K., Sir David King, said that what we do in the next three to four years will determine the future of humanity, When are we going to start listening to the scientists? When are we going to wake up and realize that if we don’t act now, we are going to see catastrophic outcomes? The audio for this interview was edited by HJ Mai.

What companies deal with oil?

Sample Companies in the Oil and Gas Industry

Integrated Upstream Midstream
Chevron Occidental Enbridge
ExxonMobile Kinder Morgan
Royal Dutch Shell Seacor Holdings Inc.
Teekay Shipping Corp.
Asked By: Richard Johnson Date: created: Sep 24 2023

Who owns the oil business

Answered By: Brian Bennett Date: created: Sep 25 2023

Many Americans believe that the oil and gas industry is owned by a few wealthy industrialists whose profits can easily be taxed away. Of course, raising taxes on any industry creates economic distortions. Higher oil and gas industry taxes means less investment in the industry and fewer employment opportunities for workers in the industry.

  • Moreover, higher oil and gas taxes are passed along to consumers in the form of higher prices.
  • Consumers suffer many times when oil and gas prices rise both through their direct purchases of oil and gas and indirectly through higher prices for goods that depend on energy.
  • But there is yet another rarely considered cost to higher taxes on the oil and gas industry: the reduced value of retirement accounts for Americans.

As it turns out, oil and gas companies, like most large American corporations, are not owned by a few wealthy individuals. Instead, they are owned by millions of ordinary Americans and foreigners, often through their retirement savings. Contrary to popular belief, only about one percent of the shares of the five major oil companies are held by officers and directors of these companies.

The rest is held by institutional investors and individual Americans, mostly in retirement accounts. Raising taxes on oil companies would hurt Americans who benefit from oil companies stocks in their retirement portfolios. In the State of New York, for example, oil and gas investments in the two largest pension plans, the State Employees’ Retirement System and the Public School Employees’ Retirement System contributed 21 percent of the funds’ return.

Higher taxes on oil and gas companies would hurt New York’s taxpayers, who would have to put more into the funds to make up for their lower returns. Even so, the Obama administration proposed raising taxes on domestic oil and gas producers in its fiscal 2013 budget.

Such taxes would, if approved by Congress, harm the economic performance of the industry and encourage investment overseas. Moreover, such new taxes would hurt American shareholders, the primary owners of these companies. Oil and natural gas companies represent a small proportion of total investments in retirement accounts, yet account for a larger share of the return on these investments.

Raising taxes on oil and gas would reduce the return on investment, and the returns to these retirement funds. In pension funds in the State of New York, for example, oil and natural gas companies represented 3.8 percent of assets, yet were responsible for 9.3 percent of returns.