Asked By: Chase Thomas Date: created: Dec 27 2023

How did Harry Potter’s dad get the Invisibility Cloak

Answered By: Brandon Miller Date: created: Dec 30 2023

Where did James Potter get the invisibility cloak from? James got it from his own father. The Invisibility Cloak was a Potter family heirloom, handed down from father to son for centuries. It was made by Ignotus Peverell, a distant ancestor of James.

Asked By: Justin Morris Date: created: Oct 24 2023

How do we know Dumbledore gave Harry the Invisibility Cloak

Answered By: Cole Morgan Date: created: Oct 24 2023

Who Sent Harry the Invisibility Cloak? – Though Harry received the gift anonymously on Christmas morning, the mysterious benefactor who sent it to him was, in fact, Headmaster Albus Dumbledore. He passed the cloak on to Harry because it once belonged to his father, though Harry didn’t learn who gave it to him until later.

Why did Dumbledore give Harry the Invisibility Cloak?

Seeing the Cloak of Invisibility brought back memories Dumbledore hadn’t had in decades. He asked to see it from James so he could study it. Dumbledore being the wise man he is however knew it belonged to Harry, so he passed it on. It is implied Dumbledore does the same thing with the Resurrection Stone.

Who is the original owner of the Invisibility Cloak?

Harry Potter’s Invisibility Cloak captured readers’ imaginations from its debut in JK Rowling’s first book, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. But it wasn’t until the seventh instalment, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, that we learned its incredible history.

  1. Now Rowling has filled in the centuries between Harry’s arrival at Hogwarts and the origins of the Cloak as one of the Deathly Hallows of wizarding lore in a new post on her re-launched publishing website, Pottermore – and proved Ron Weasley right in the process.
  2. In Deathly Hallows, Rowling writes that the Invisibility Cloak was created by Ignotus Peverell, a 13th-century wizard who eluded death by wearing it.

Before his death, he handed it down to his son. Ron suspected that Harry’s cloak may be the same as that created by Peverell due to its good condition – traditionally Invisibility Cloaks wear out over time, and Harry’s had originally belonged to his father, James.

  1. Rowling has now confirmed Ron’s suspicions.
  2. Her Pottermore piece explains that Iolanthe Peverell, granddaughter of Ignotus, married into the Potter family some time after the death of her father.
  3. As the eldest of her generation, of which there were no male heirs, she inherited the cloak and explained to her new husband, Hardwin Potter, that it was tradition to keep it a secret.

The cloak was then handed down to the eldest in each new generation of Potters, which included Harry’s grandfather, Fleamont, and their son, James Potter. Following James’s death, at the hands of Lord Voldemort, Hogwarts headmaster Albus Dumbledore kept the cloak in his safekeeping until Harry enrolled at the school.

Rowling tells other humourous stories about the Potter family, including the fact that Linford, the earliest Potter in wizarding history, gave his unwitting muggle neighbours magical cures and formed reliable wizarding medicines such as Skele-gro (used by Harry in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets) to re-grow the bones in his arm.

You can read the full extract here,

Asked By: Isaiah Foster Date: created: Dec 06 2022

Did Snape know Harry had the Invisibility Cloak

Answered By: Brandon Wood Date: created: Dec 07 2022

In the Sorcerer’s Stone, when Snape was roughing up Prof. Quirrell in the hallway, Snape noticed that something was nearby (Harry under the cloak of invisibility).

How did Harry Potter parents get so rich?

p”> Harry is stunned the first time he sees he has inherited a fortune from his family. Warner Bros. Throughout J.K. Rowling’s beloved wizarding series, Harry Potter’s wealth is no secret. In the first book, “Harry Potter and the Sorcere’s Stone,” Hagrid takes Potter to visit his vault at wizarding bank Gringotts, for the first time.

Inside, Potter is stunned to find a seemingly endless trove of bronze knuts, silver sickles, and gold galleons, the currency of the wizarding world. For years, fans have wondered how the Potter family came to be so rich, especially given that Harry’s parents, Lily and James, were only 21 when they were murdered by Lord Voldemort.

“How did Harry inherit so much money when his parents will have only worked 2 years tops at an ok wage,” one reddit user asked, “They also had a house, which would’ve set them back a lot.” On Tuesday, author J.K. Rowling finally revealed the source of the Potter income in a new entry on fan site Pottermore,

  1. According to Rowling, the first member of the Potter family was a 12th century man a named Linfred of Stinchcombe.
  2. Linfred was a vague and absent-minded fellow whose Muggle neighbours often called upon his medicinal services,” Rowling explained.
  3. It was these “medicinal services,” including “Skele-gro” and “Pepper Potion,” that were the beginnings of the Potter family fortune.

You might remember Skele-gro from the second book, where Madame Pomfrey treats Harry with it to re-grow his arm bones after a quidditch match. Harry is in need of some serious Skele-gro after this quidditch match. Warner Brothers Linfred turned a nice profit selling his treatments and when he died, left a ” significant pile of gold” to each of his seven kids. Over the next several decades, members of the Potter family worked diligently to maintain the family’s wealth, Rowling explained,

  1. Fast forward to the 20th century, where Fleamont Potter, a distant descendant of Linfred of Stinchcombe, ” took the family gold and quadrupled it.
  2. Like Linfred of Stinchcombe, Fleamont also had a knack for creating potions.
  3. He was the creator of Sleekeazy’s Hair Potion, a beauty product which would later become a favorite of witches including Hermione Granger.

Fleamont ” sold the company at a vast profit when he retired,” Rowling writes, Fleamont Potter died of dragon pox and his fortune was left to his son, James Potter. From there, the family fortune was bequeathed to Harry, after James and Lily Potter were killed. Sign up for notifications from Insider! Stay up to date with what you want to know. Subscribe to push notifications Read next Loading Something is loading. Thanks for signing up! Access your favorite topics in a personalized feed while you’re on the go.

Asked By: Carl Johnson Date: created: Jul 30 2023

How did Harry survive Avada Kedavra in the forest

Answered By: Joseph Wood Date: created: Aug 01 2023

Harry Potter is the only known person to have ever survived the killing curse in the franchise, and twice. How did he do it? Is he immortal now? Harry Potter was first released as a book series that had not even been completed (2007) before being made into a film franchise series in 2001. And yet in seven books and eight movies, no one but the title character himself has ever walked away from The Killing Curse (one of three Unforgivable Curses that causes instantaneous death), and Harry managed to do it twice.

This reputation even gave him the title of “The Boy Who Lived.” The Killing Curse (or Avada Kedavra ) is supposed to be a life-ending curse that no wizard, no matter how powerful, can undo. Although the curse can be counteracted with Sacrificial Protection powered by love, once the damage is done there is no going back.

So how did Harry Potter not only survive this Unforgivable Curse with no more than a scratch, but also again a second time? When Harry was just a baby, his mother and father (Lily and James Potter) were killed when Voldemort came to end Harry’s life.

Voldemort was a great and powerful wizard, but he was evil and corrupted. After a reading from Divination professor Sybill Trelawney that stated he would be defeated by a male child born at the end of July, Voldemort had two guesses as to who this child would be. One was Neville Longbottom whom Voldemort sent Death Eaters after, and the other was Harry Potter whom Voldemort went to kill himself.

Voldemort said he did not want to waste perfectly good wizards, especially purebloods. His only mission was to kill the two potentials threats in his future so that he would never be challenged. This is why Voldemort even told Lily to step out of the way when he came to kill Harry; he told Lily she did not have to needlessly die.

  1. Voldemort’s goal in life was to be the most powerful, threatening wizard of all time, and to always escape death.
  2. He never wanted to die, which is why he made six Horcruxes and went to kill Harry.
  3. But when Lily refused to step out of the way and protect her child at all costs, even her own life, that kind of love was not known to Voldemort.

It’s magic could not be understood. In order to create a Horcrux, a wizard must split their soul and hide a piece of it in an object in order to become immortal. To do this, they must first commit murder. Voldemort intentionally made six Horcruxes, but when he used Avada Kedavra on Harry, he unintentionally created a seventh Horcrux.

Instead of dying, Lily’s love for Harry created a counter ‘curse’ known as Sacrificial Protection and saved Harry. This type of love and sacrifice is a blood curse, and will forever protect the life of the individual whom has been ‘cursed.’ So, when Voldemort attacked Harry with The Killing Curse after Lily died defending him, Harry’s protection curse caused the magic to bounce off (or rebound) and strike Voldemort, causing him to ‘die’ and lose his mortal body.

Until the fourth book and film, Voldemort is still trying to get back his physical form ( much like Sauron in Lord of the Rings ) but fails a few times before finally using Harry’s blood to bring back his body and regain full strength. When Voldemort returns for the finale of the series, he again uses Avada Kedavra on Harry. Because Voldemort’s soul was no longer fragmented —save for a large serpent named Nagini—he would soon be vulnerable enough to be killed for good. When Harry was struck, he was forced into a sort of Limbo reality where he encountered Dumbledore, who offered Harry a brief explanation of what had happened as well as a choice to go to his final resting place to be with his parents, or go back and finish off Voldemort.

Harry obviously chooses to continue living, and with the help of Neville (who was fulfilling his side of the prophecy by killing Nagini) Harry is able to end the reign of Voldemort for good. Harry Potter was sort of immortal against Voldemort as long as he was alive and a threat. With Voldemort dead, Lily’s love curse or spell would have fulfilled its purpose and no longer have been in effect,

Harry was the only known wizard to survive The Killing Curse, but it seems that if a similar situation occurred, where one sacrificed themself for another out of deep love and care, then they too could have that lasting protection against evil with the power of love.

How were the Potters so rich?

It was these ‘medicinal services,’ including ‘Skele-gro’ and ‘Pepper Potion,’ that were the beginnings of the Potter family fortune. Linfred turned a nice profit selling his treatments and when he died, left a ‘significant pile of gold’ to each of his seven kids.

Asked By: Hunter Butler Date: created: Feb 16 2023

Why did Hermione not help Dobby

Answered By: Adrian Simmons Date: created: Feb 18 2023

Why doesn’t Hermione try to help him? Hermione had just been tortured by Crucio (cast several times by Bellatrix). She was in no condition to be helping anyone. Even after being tended to while Harry, and later Ron and Dean as well, were digging the grave, she was still shaky and pale at Dobby’s funeral.

How did James Potter save Snape?

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban – In Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, Snape demonstrates his expertise with potions by brewing the complex Wolfsbane potion for the new Defence Against the Dark Arts professor, Remus Lupin, Throughout the third book, Snape suspects that Lupin may be helping Harry’s godfather Sirius Black enter Hogwarts castle; Sirius had been convicted (wrongly, as it is later revealed) of murdering Peter Pettigrew and innocent bystanders, and betraying the Potter family’s hiding place to Voldemort.

  • This suspicion stems from Lupin’s friendship with Sirius and Harry’s father, James, while they were all at Hogwarts as students.
  • Near the climax of the book, Snape attempts to apprehend Sirius, but Sirius escapes with Harry’s aid.
  • Snape informs Dumbledore of this circumstance, and when Harry and Lupin are not punished, Snape retaliates by revealing to the entire school that Lupin is a werewolf, forcing the latter to resign his post.

Prisoner of Azkaban reveals more details about the connection between Snape and James. While in school together, Sirius once tricked Snape into almost entering the Shrieking Shack while Lupin was there, transformed into a werewolf. James realised the danger and stopped Snape, saving his life; this is the incident Dumbledore referred to at the end of the first book.

Did Dumbledore have all three Deathly Hallows?

At different points, Dumbledore possessed all three Deathly Hallows. He won the Elder Wand from Grindelwald, had the Invisibility Cloak in his possession when James Potter died, and wore the Resurrection Stone as it sat in Marvolo Gaunt’s ring.

What was Dumbledore’s secret in Deathly Hallows?

Everything About The Deathly Hallows – Dumbledore had known of the Deathly Hallows for over a century before his death, having researched them with Grindelwald when they were teenagers. He ended up collecting the Deathly Hallows at separate points, none of which he told Harry about. The only one that Dumbledore discussed with Harry was the Invisibility Cloak, which was kept outside of the context of the Deathly Hallows.

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Is Snape good or bad?

Summary –

Snape’s true intentions were revealed in the final Harry Potter installment, showing that he was never truly evil but was instead protecting Harry from Voldemort. Clues throughout the series hint at Snape’s true nature, such as his reaction to Harry’s scar pain and his attempts to counteract Quirrell’s jinx during a Quidditch match. Snape’s actions, such as shielding Harry and his friends from harm and hesitating when killing Dumbledore, further demonstrate that he was not a villain but had a deeper plan to earn Voldemort’s trust.

Since the first Harry Potter movie, Severus Snape was presented as a villainous figure, but once the final installment was released, viewers learned his intentions were never evil — so, was Snape good or bad? The Harry Potter series told the story of “the boy who lived” and Lord Voldemort, the darkest wizard of all who had sinister plans for the Muggle and wizarding worlds and a personal vendetta against Harry.

  • The books’ success allowed them to make the jump to the big screen, and so the Harry Potter movie saga was released between 2001 and 2011 with the final novel, The Deathly Hallows, divided into two parts.
  • With the Harry Potter reboot series at Max on the way, there’s no better time to look back at the question, “was Snape good or bad?”.

Severus Snape (Alan Rickman) was the Potions Master at Hogwarts when Harry, Ron Weasley, and Hermione Granger arrived, and quickly positioned himself as an enemy of the trio, especially of Harry. However, following the reveal in Deathly Hallows that all he wanted to do was protect Harry from Voldemort, when rewatching the movies it’s easier to catch all those subtle hints at him not being a villain at all.

Asked By: Xavier Torres Date: created: Jun 14 2023

How did Voldemort get the resurrection stone

Answered By: Juan Bennett Date: created: Jun 14 2023

Why were Harry Potter and Lord Voldemort so obsessed with the Deathly Hallows? H arry Harry dreamed of the Resurrection Stone, Voldemort chose Horcruxes over Hallows, and they both developed a bit of a fixation with the Elder Wand. But what do their responses to the Hallows say about their attitudes to death? Even before Voldemort decided to act on a prophecy he only half understood, the connections between the Dark Lord and the Boy Who Lived were numerous. Although they grew up decades apart, Harry and Voldemort were both half-bloods initially raised in a Muggle world, and neither had any concept of their own heritage or the wider wizarding world.

  • So they obviously weren’t aware of their common descent from the creators of the Deathly Hallows, aka the Three Brothers.
  • It was a long time before Harry realised his Invisibility Cloak meant he was descended from Ignotus Peverell, and although Voldemort boasted of his Slytherin heritage he does not seem to have appreciated his Peverell ancestry.

And yet there again he and Harry were similar: Voldemort’s connection to the Peverells was also revealed through a family heirloom – a ring containing Cadmus Peverell’s Resurrection Stone that had been passed down through the generations, eventually ending up in the possession of Voldemort’s mother’s family. Of course, as Sirius once told Harry, most wizarding families were related in some way, and it certainly wasn’t this distant, unknown connection that led Voldemort to target Harry. Instead, Dumbledore believed Voldemort marked out Harry because he had noticed the similarities they shared – not just their childhoods, but their appearance, Parselmouth status, twin-core wands, connected minds and, briefly, a shared interest in the Elder Wand.

  1. But as Harry learnt more about his connection with Voldemort, it became clearer that the differences between them were far more important – and those differences often came down to their choices, particularly when it came to life, love and death.
  2. Dumbledore believed Voldemort was ignorant of the relationship between the three Hallows, something supported by the fact that he used his own ancestral Hallow to create a Horcrux.

Even if he had known about them, Dumbledore speculated that he wouldn’t have cared: Voldemort chose Horcruxes, not Hallows, always wanting to work alone rather than rely on anything or anyone else. The exception to this was the third Hallow – the Elder Wand. This was the one Voldemort had heard of, and he coveted it for its history and unbeatable reputation. At first he wanted only to defeat Harry, but after a time he became obsessed with obtaining it to make himself truly invulnerable.

And obtain it he did, but not under circumstances that made him its master. Harry might have initially favoured the Resurrection Stone, but for a time he too was equally obsessed with the Elder Wand: And desire for the Elder Wand, the Deathstick, unbeatable, invincible, swallowed him once more. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Unlike Voldemort, though, Harry’s obsession was short-lived.

It was grief for Dobby that gave him clarity, and in those cold moments outside Shell Cottage Harry found himself able to think, to understand in a way that Voldemort never could. He knew, as Dumbledore had known, that possessing the three Hallows might make him Master of Death – but in the end, he chose not to pursue the third Hallow because defeating Voldemort was more important than saving himself. Harry’s reaction was entirely opposite. He embraced life, but he never ran from death. He chose to dig Dobby’s grave by hand because he was starting to understand Dumbledore’s belief that grief and love were two sides of the same coin. Alone in the dark, he accepted Dumbledore’s last unspoken instruction: that he might know about the Hallows, but it would not benefit him to seek them out. That was when the Resurrection Stone revealed its secrets to him. It was also possibly the closest Harry ever came to being Master of Death: possessor of two Hallows and true master of the Elder Wand. So perhaps it was the protection of the Hallows that allowed him to sacrifice himself to Voldemort and survive, but even without them, Harry would have done the same.

As Dumbledore told him: ‘You are the true master of death, because the true master does not seek to run away from Death. He accepts that he must die, and understands that there are far, far worse things in the living world than dying.’ Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows That’s why, despite his Horcruxes and his fixation with the Elder Wand, Voldemort could never master death.

He ran from it as Harry did not. Harry’s own brief obsession with the Hallows was motivated not by fear, but by a desire to bring back and protect the people he loved. In the end, though, it was his willingness to let the Hallows go that made him their true Master.

How old is Dumbledore?

Character development – Rowling said she enjoyed writing Dumbledore because he “is the epitome of goodness.” She said that Dumbledore speaks for her, as he “knows pretty much everything” about the Harry Potter universe, Rowling mentioned that Dumbledore regrets “that he has always had to be the one who knew, and who had the burden of knowing.

And he would rather not know.” As a mentor to the central character Harry Potter, “Dumbledore is a very wise man who knows that Harry is going to have to learn a few hard lessons to prepare him for what may be coming in his life. He allows Harry to get into what he wouldn’t allow another pupil to do, and he also unwillingly permits Harry to confront things he’d rather protect him from.” In a 1999 interview, Rowling stated that she imagined Dumbledore “more as a John Gielgud type, you know, quite elderly and – and quite stately.” During his time as a student, Dumbledore was in Gryffindor House.

Rowling said in an interview that Dumbledore was about 150 years old. However, on her website, she states that Dumbledore was born in 1881, making him either 115 or 116 at the time of his death. On 19 October 2007, Rowling was asked by a young fan whether Dumbledore finds “true love”.

  1. Rowling said that she always thought of Dumbledore as being homosexual and that he had fallen in love with the corrupt wizard Gellert Grindelwald, which was Dumbledore’s “great tragedy”; Rowling did not explicitly state whether Grindelwald returned his affections.
  2. Rowling explains this further by elaborating on the motivations behind Dumbledore’s flirtation with the idea of wizard domination of Muggles : “He lost his moral compass completely when he fell in love and I think subsequently became very mistrustful of his own judgement in those matters so became quite asexual,

He led a celibate and a bookish life.”

Why did Voldemort like Snape so much?

Faithful Snape – The-Leaky-Cauldron.org Submitted by: Arthura Weasley Faithful Snape A Study of Snape’s Faithfulness to Each of His Masters By Arthura Weasley Introduction The question of Snape’s loyalties is currently the most intriguing and befuddling debate among Harry Potter readers, and it has been looked upon from several angles.

  1. I believe there is reason to study Snape’s enigma from one more angle ‘ the fact of his being a servant and spy for two very different masters, Dumbledore and Voldemort.
  2. I believe much can be learned of Snape’s loyalties by analyzing the nature of these two masters and Snape’s relationship with each of them.

By studying Snape’s behavior on both sides, one can try to determine where Snape’s true loyalties might lie. Two Masters Dumbledore and Voldemort are very different types of leaders. Voldemort controls his Death Eaters through ruthless tyranny and fear.

  • Failure is harshly punished.
  • But he fears his followers as well.
  • He seems to expect them to lie to him and prides himself on being able to detect this dishonesty through Legilimency: he nearly always knows when he is being lied to.
  • Dumbledore, on the other hand, relied on mutual trust and respect, rather than mutual fear as the basis for his leadership.

Many fear that Dumbledore was too trusting for his own good, even dangerously reckless. Snape said of him, “you overlook Dumbledore’s greatest weakness: he has to believe the best of people.” 1 But was this indeed a weakness? Or was it his greatest strength? Dumbledore’s trust, though absolute once given, was never given carelessly.

Before granting someone his trust, Dumbledore demanded complete trust in return, as his habit of keeping his followers in the dark on important matters clearly demonstrated. His steadfast refusal to tell Harry ‘ or anyone else ‘ his reasons for trusting Snape are a case in point. He expected his followers to have faith in him and he in turn had faith in them.

As Dumbledore’s follower, you either carried out your orders, or lost your master’s trust. But Voldemort knows that most of his followers are serving him out of fear and in the hopes of furthering their own interests, and this creates an inherently unstable group.

  1. In a system where followers serve based on fear rather than trust, the slightest perceived weakness can cause them to turn on the leader and abandon him.
  2. As Dumbledore told Harry: “Have you any idea how much tyrants fear the people they oppress? All of them realize that, one day, amongst their many victims, there is sure to be one who rises against them and strikes back!” 2 We see this also when Snape explains to Bellatrix why he prevented Quirrell from retrieving the stone, he said: ” was in a pitiable condition, very weak, sharing the body of a mediocre wizard.

He did not dare reveal himself to a former ally if that ally might turn him over to Dumbledore or the Ministry.” 3 Notice how weak and alone Voldemort seems in this description. He cannot and does not trust any of his followers in his weakened state. Because Voldemort rules by fear and can’t trust his followers, he cannot threaten to withdraw his trust if they are disobedient.

  1. He can only threaten torture or death.
  2. However, while this can ensure obedience to a point, it does not guarantee loyalty.
  3. Without trust, Voldemort is forced to value usefulness over faithfulness.
  4. A good example of this would be his growing coolness towards Bellatrix, contrary to the high regard in which he holds Snape.

Though Bellatrix rails against this, Snape correctly points out: “if he had not forgiven we who lost faith at that time, he would have very few followers left.” 4 What blinds Voldemort to the danger in this situation is his own arrogance. Voldemort fails to understand that the more force he uses and the more fear he causes, the more force is likely to be used against him in return.

He prides himself on being the best Legilimens ever to walk the earth. He fails to see that there will always be a stronger Occlumens; a loophole through which to escape his strike, an Achilles heel by which to bring about his end. He is so arrogant and smug in his power, he cannot believe himself to be vulnerable.

Dumbledore’s advantage over Voldemort was that he acknowledged his own mortality and imperfection and was able to use it to his advantage. He didn’t wish to nourish his own ego with illusions of greatness by trying to be more than human. Dumbledore took pride in being human; therefore death wasn’t a threat to him.

  1. He was motivated by love for others, and by being so, left a mark stronger and more eternal than any Horcrux ‘ as Harry said, “He will only be gone from this school when none here are loyal to him.” 5 Voldemort is motivated by fear and selfishness and only a deluded few are truly loyal to him.
  2. This fact makes him less immortal than any of his fellow men ‘ death to him is more final, for he leaves no one behind.

He is victim of the illusion that he can gain enough power to protect himself from anything that may come, but the truth is, there will always be a Dumbledore to discover his secrets, a Harry to hunt down his Horcruxes. Servant How well has Snape served his two masters? Well enough that each believed him to be loyal.

  • We have ample evidence of how Snape served Dumbledore.
  • In Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, it is clear that Dumbledore knew of the plot to steal the Stone and of Harry’s attempt to prevent this.
  • Dumbledore let The Boy Who Lived fight his battle.
  • That same boy wisely observed: I think he sort of wanted to give me a chance.

I reckon he had a pretty good idea we were going to try, and instead of stopping us, he just taught us enough to help. I don’t think it was an accident he let me find out how the Mirror worked. It’s almost like he thought I had the right to fight Voldemort if I could.6 And indeed, Dumbledore praised Harry at the end for his success ‘ “You did do the thing properly, didn’t you?” 7 Is it credible to imagine that Dumbledore didn’t know what Snape was up to all this time? Hardly.

Instead it seems reasonable to believe that Snape was acting on Dumbledore’s orders or at least with Dumbledore’s knowledge in protecting Harry and watching Quirrell. In Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban Snape brews the Wolfsbane Potion for Lupin even though he distrusts the man.8 And he again protects Harry, this time from Sirius Black whom he believed to be a murderer.

Hidden under the invisibility cloak, Snape could have easily waited for Black to kill Harry before intervening, but he didn’t.9 Likewise, in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Dumbledore recites to Harry all of the steps Snape took to try and prevent the disaster at the Department of Mysteries.10 Snape needn’t have acted as he did.

  • He could have simply pretended that he didn’t understand Harry’s cryptic warning in Umbridge’s office and walked away, leaving Harry to go to his death.11 This event is particularly important because it illustrates how Snape served Dumbledore even when Dumbledore wasn’t around to give him orders.
  • His loyalty was constant and unwavering.
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Some would explain Dumbledore’s trust of Snape and Snape’s seeming loyalty to him with an Unbreakable Vow between the two. I find this impossible. Voldemort would ensure obedience via a death threat. Dumbledore would never do such a thing. Dumbledore’s strength was that he insisted on true loyalty ‘ such that made his followers willing to die for his cause.

  1. This doesn’t mean that Snape would never disagree with Dumbledore or show his displeasure at what he considered to be a mistake.
  2. He could argue vehemently with Dumbledore and many a time spoke his mind, completely fearless of losing Dumbledore’s trust.
  3. Unlike the relationship between Voldemort and his Death Eaters, Dumbledore’s relationship with his followers wasn’t based on fear and bribery.

Snape wasn’t Dumbledore’s lap-dog, nor was he his slave. He didn’t serve Dumbledore’s personal interests, hoping to get a reward and to gain some power along the way. He didn’t flatter or try to please Dumbledore. Rather, he knew that he had Dumbledore’s complete confidence and therefore nothing to fear.

Snape seems to enjoy Voldemort’s confidence as well. The reason, again, lies in Voldemort’s arrogant confidence in his abilities as a Legilimens. He doesn’t trust Snape as Dumbledore does, but he believes that he can detect any disloyalty. Moreover, Voldemort regards Snape as highly intelligent and therefore ‘ as a true Slytherin ‘ a person whose top priority is to take care of himself.

To his twisted mind, selfless equals stupid. Just as he is incapable of understanding of the power of love, the idea that such an intelligent man as Snape might act selflessly for a greater cause must be inconceivable to him. We know less about how Snape has served Voldemort, though Bellatrix complained that he hasn’t done enough.

  • Nevertheless, it is clear that Snape’s spying was his primary contribution to Voldemort’s cause ‘ at least until Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.
  • It can certainly be argued that Snape’s greatest service to Voldemort was killing Dumbledore.12 Voldemort surely believes that this proves where Snape’s loyalties lie.

But Snape’s actions are rarely straightforward. Draco’s life was also at stake that night, as was Snape’s own, and it is extremely unlikely that a weak, ill and defenseless Dumbledore could have survived facing four Death Eaters even if Snape had chosen to sacrifice both himself and Draco.

Dumbledore would not have wanted Snape to throw away his and Draco’s lives for nothing. He would have wanted Snape to survive in order to fight on, and he would have been willing to sacrifice his own life to make that possible ‘ something Voldemort could not conceive of. Spy Just how effective was Snape’s spying for each of his masters? In the past, Snape told Voldemort about the prophecy 13 and warned Dumbledore that the Potters had been targeted to be killed.14 But what has he done for his masters lately? At Spinner’s End Snape tells Bellatrix: “I had sixteen years of information on Dumbledore to give him when he returned, a rather more useful welcome-back present than endless reminiscences of how unpleasant Azkaban is.” 15 Here again we see that Voldemort values his useful servant, Snape, over his faithful one, Bellatrix.

But beyond that, we have little evidence that this information was particularly damaging to Dumbledore or his cause. There are only two specific instances that Snape mentions where his spying reaped results. One was the information he gave that led to the death of Emmeline Vance.

  1. The other when Snape claims to have passed Voldemort information that “helped dispose of Sirius Black.” 16 These are serious claims.
  2. I am sure that Dumbledore wouldn’t sanction the passing of information that would cost Order members’ lives, unless it was absolutely necessary.
  3. But is Snape being entirely truthful with Bellatrix? Dumbledore told Harry that Kreacher was the one responsible for Voldemort’s knowledge of Sirius and Harry’s close relationship.17 It is quite possible that Snape confirmed the testimony of the wacky old house-elf, but that is very different from the impression he gives when speaking to Bellatrix.

He is taking much more credit than he deserves for Sirius’s undoing and we can suspect that he may also be exaggerating his role in Vance’s death as well. Perhaps the most important question regarding Snape’s espionage is whether or not he knows about the hunt for the Horcruxes.

  • Snape was something of a confidante to Dumbledore in matters concerning Voldemort, which makes sense given Snape’s role as Dumbledore’s spy.
  • We get hints of this throughout the series.
  • Snape alone of the Order knew any of the contents of the prophecy; he alone knew that Quirrell was after the Philosopher’s Stone and he was the one whom Dumbledore turned to when desperately injured after destroying the ring Horcrux.

Most telling, however, was Dumbledore’s request to Harry in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince : ” ˜Go and wake Severus,’ said Dumbledore faintly but clearly. ˜Tell him what happened and bring him to me. Do nothing else, speak to nobody else and do not remove your cloak.

I shall wait here.’ ” 18 Regardless of why Dumbledore wanted Snape, notice his phrasing ‘ “Tell him what happened.” Although Dumbledore is adamant that no one else should know what has transpired, he urges Harry to inform Snape and it is impossible to imagine that the subject of Horcruxes wouldn’t have come up in any exchange between the two.

Even if Harry hadn’t specifically told Snape about finding the Horcrux, one look into Harry’s eyes would likely have given Snape that crucial bit of information. Dumbledore was not the least concerned about Snape gaining this knowledge even though he didn’t want any of his other followers to know this secret.

That most likely means that Snape already knew about the Horcrux hunt to some degree. If this is true, then clearly Snape didn’t inform Voldemort of this threat or the Dark Lord would surely have been actively taking steps to stop Harry and Dumbledore from finding his remaining Horcruxes. Double-Agent Who, of Snape’s two masters, would be more difficult to fool from the point of view of a double-agent: Voldemort or Dumbledore? At first glance, if might appear that Voldemort would be the harder to deceive, but in reality it’s just the opposite.

Snape can act as a double-agent very successfully when the one he’s supposed to fool is Voldemort. He can explain away questionable behavior such as not attempting to find Voldemort after his downfall, staying as a teacher at Hogwarts and standing between Voldemort and the Philosopher’s Stone by saying that these failings were actions he took for his own personal interests.

  • This is typical for a Death Eater.
  • Furthermore, he can explain away his relationship with Dumbledore: “And through all this we are supposed to believe Dumbledore has never suspected you?” asked Bellatrix.
  • He has no idea of your true allegiance, he trusts you implicitly still?” “I have played my part well’ said Snape.

“And you overlook Dumbledore’s greatest weakness: he has to believe the best of people. I spun him a tale of deepest remorse when I joined his staff, fresh from my Death Eater days, and he embraced me with open arms ‘ though, as I say, never allowing me nearer the Dark Arts than he could help.” 19 I believe that Bellatrix demonstrates Voldemort’s way of thinking for us in this passage.

  1. She finds it very far-fetched that Dumbledore trusts Snape “implicitly still.” Snape attempts to appease her disbelief by pointing out that Dumbledore has refused him the Defense Against the Dark Arts position numerous times, implying some wariness on Dumbledore’s part.
  2. This is important because the notion that Dumbledore could be completely fearless of his followers is just as inconceivable to Bellatrix and Voldemort as the notion that Snape could be acting on other than selfish motives.

Genuine trust is beyond their comprehension. And yet it is what gave Dumbledore control over his followers. Could Snape have explained away myriad failures by pleading cowardice or self-interest to Dumbledore? Would Dumbledore put up with followers who put their personal interests before their loyalty to him? Would he trust a follower who would give up on his cause when he wasn’t there to keep an eye on them? He would not.

  1. This is why Dumbledore’s system of leadership was inherently stronger than Voldemort’s.
  2. Whereas Voldemort can only judge his followers on their dubious actions, Dumbledore trusted the person,
  3. He understood the human heart, its strengths and weaknesses, far better than Voldemort.
  4. For this reason, I believe it to be more likely that it was Voldemort who was wrong about Snape; Voldemort who has sown the seeds of his own fall by creating a fearful, traitorous web of followers in which he is unable to distinguish a faithless follower from a downright traitor.

The Contribution of Snape’s Loyalties to the Story Snape is an amazing character and the solution to the questions raised by this enigmatic man will surely have incredible importance in the final book of the Harry Potter series. If Snape turns out to be evil it would emphasize the theme of human imperfection and show us painfully how the best of us make the worst mistakes.

  1. If he turns out to be no one’s man but his own it would stress the notion of balance between good and evil.
  2. Lately, I have noticed that many fans tend to prefer this possibility which they think will make for a more complex and believable solution.
  3. I, however, don’t see a point in making the distinction between “Voldemort’s man” and “his own man.” I think being Voldemort’s man is quite the same as being your own man ‘ your motives are selfish and what you’re interested in is power.

I have established in this essay that Voldemort is weak compared to Dumbledore because he essentially has no servants at all ‘ they’re all in it for personal gain. Quirrell explained it very eloquently ‘ “There is no good and evil, there is only power, and those too weak to seek it.” 20 On the other hand, if Snape turns out to be good I believe it would emphasize powerfully some of the most important themes in the series without contradicting in the slightest any of the themes previously mentioned.

  • It would show that trust is a steadier foundation of leadership than fear and it would stress the importance of choices.
  • Snape would be the primary example of redemption, of choosing the right way despite an unfitting background and countenance.
  • Contrary to Harry, who despite parallels with Voldemort is the evil wizard’s ultimate opposite, Snape would be Voldemort’s truer parallel ‘ someone who, without Harry’s support and overwhelming capacity for love, redeemed himself and made the right choice.

It would show us that being a bitter, harsh, hurt and friendless person doesn’t mean you can’t choose right over easy. Notes 1. Rowling, Half-Blood Prince, 36.2. Ibid., 477.3. Ibid., 33.4. Ibid., 32.5. Ibid., 604.6. Ibid., Philosopher’s Stone, 219.7. Ibid., 215.8.

Ibid., Prisoner of Azkaban, 352.9. Ibid., 357.10. Ibid., Order of the Phoenix, 830.11. Ibid., 830-3.12. Ibid., Half-Blood Prince, 556.13. Ibid., 512.14. Ibid., Prisoner of Azkaban, 204.15. Ibid., Half-Blood Prince, 32.16. Ibid., 35.17. Ibid., Order of the Phoenix, 831.18. Ibid., Half-Blood Prince, 545.19.

Ibid., 36.20. Ibid., Philosopher’s Stone, 211. Bibliography Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, London: Bloomsbury, 1997. “””. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, New York: Scholastic Press, Arthur A. Levine Books, 1999. “””. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix,

Asked By: Samuel Barnes Date: created: Feb 14 2024

Did Voldemort know Snape was

Answered By: Francis Harris Date: created: Feb 15 2024

Summary –

Voldemort chose to kill Snape using his Horcrux snake Nagini instead of using the Avada Kedavra curse, possibly to maintain trust and loyalty. Snape’s loyalty to Dumbledore and Harry was revealed in the last film, proving that he had always been on the good side. Voldemort never realized that Snape was actually a spy and remained loyal to him until his death, possibly due to Snape’s ability to shield his mind.

Voldemort killed Snape in Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows Part 2 using his Horcrux snake Nagini instead of his favorite Unforgivable Curse, Avada Kedavra. Throughout the Harry Potter movies, Voldemort used the Killing Curse on several characters, including Alastor Moody, as well as Lily and James Potter.

  • However, he didn’t always use Avada Kedavra on his enemies, also killing characters indirectly (such as Myrtle Warren with the Basilisk, or Cedric Diggory by ordering Wormtail to kill him).
  • Snape’s tragic death was a peculiar case, though.
  • Voldemort directly killed his Death Eater, but he chose not to use the Unforgivable Curse, and there might be a good reason for it.

One of the most misunderstood, and most popular, characters in the series was Severus Snape, who seemed an antagonist and villain until his true loyalties boiled to the surface, and he sacrificed himself for his students. Snape grew up bullied and angry while at Hogwarts.

Why does Voldemort trust Snape so much?

2 Answers. Snape is a master Occlumens — that means he can shield his thoughts from those with skill in Legilimency, which is basically mind reading. Both Dumbledore and Voldemort are experts in this particular skill.

Why is the Malfoy family so rich?

Originally published on on Aug 10th 2015 The Malfoy name comes from old French and translates as ‘bad faith’. Like many other progenitors of noble English families, the wizard Armand Malfoy arrived in Britain with William the Conqueror as part of the invading Norman army. Having rendered unknown, shady (and almost certainly magical) services to King William I, Malfoy was given a prime piece of land in Wiltshire, seized from local landowners, upon which his descendants have lived for ten consecutive centuries.

Their wily ancestor Armand encapsulated many of the qualities that have distinguished the Malfoy family to the present day. The Malfoys have always had the reputation, hinted at by their not altogether complimentary surname, of being a slippery bunch, to be found courting power and riches wherever they might be found.

In spite of their espousal of pure-blood values and their undoubtedly genuine belief in wizards’ superiority over Muggles, the Malfoys have never been above ingratiating themselves with the non-magical community when it suits them. The result is that they are one of the richest wizarding families in Britain, and it has been rumoured for many years (though never proven) that over the centuries the family has dabbled successfully in Muggle currency and assets.

  1. Over hundreds of years, they have managed to add to their lands in Wiltshire by annexing those of neighbouring Muggles, and the favour they curried with royalty added Muggle treasures and works of art to an ever-expanding collection.
  2. Historically, the Malfoys drew a sharp distinction between poor Muggles and those with wealth and authority.
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Until the imposition of the Statute of Secrecy in 1692, the Malfoy family was active within high-born Muggle circles, and it is said that their fervent opposition to the imposition of the Statute was due, in part, to the fact that they would have to withdraw from this enjoyable sphere of social life.

Though hotly denied by subsequent generations, there is ample evidence to suggest that the first Lucius Malfoy was an unsuccessful aspirant to the hand of Elizabeth I, and some wizarding historians allege that the Queen’s subsequent opposition to marriage was due to a jinx placed upon her by the thwarted Malfoy.

With that healthy degree of self-preservation that has characterised most of their actions over the centuries, once the Statute of Secrecy had passed into law the Malfoys ceased fraternising with Muggles, however well-born, and accepted that further opposition and protests could only distance them from the new heart of power: the newly created Ministry of Magic.

  1. They performed an abrupt volte-face, and became as vocally supportive of the Statute as any of those who had championed it from the beginning, hastening to deny that they had ever been on speaking (or marrying) terms with Muggles.
  2. The substantial wealth at their disposal ensured them considerable (and much resented) influence at the Ministry for generations to come, though no Malfoy has ever aspired to the role of Minister for Magic.

It is often said of the Malfoy family that you will never find one at the scene of the crime, though their fingerprints might be all over the guilty wand. Independently wealthy, with no need to work for a living, they have generally preferred the role of power behind the throne, happy for others to do the donkey work and to take the responsibility for failure.

They have helped finance many of their preferred candidates’ election campaigns, which have (it is alleged) included paying for dirty work such as hexing the opposition. The Malfoys’ unfeigned contempt for all Muggles who could not offer them jewels or influence, and for the majority of their fellow wizards, drew them naturally towards the pure-blood doctrine, which seemed for several years in the twentieth century to be their likeliest source of untrammelled power.

From the imposition of the Statute of Secrecy onwards, no Malfoy has married a Muggle or Muggle-born. The family has, however, eschewed the somewhat dangerous practice of inter-marrying within such a small pool of pure-bloods that they become enfeebled or unstable, unlike a small minority of fanatic families such as the Gaunts and Lestranges, and many a half-blood appears on the Malfoy family tree.

Notable Malfoys of past generations include the fourteenth-century Nicholas Malfoy, who is believed to have dispatched many a fractious Muggle tenant under the guise of the Black Death, though escaping censure by the Wizards’ Council; Septimus Malfoy, who was greatly influential at the Ministry in the late eighteenth century, many claiming that Minister for Magic Unctuous Osbert was little more than his puppet; and Abraxas Malfoy, who was widely believed to be part of the shady plot that saw the first Muggle-born Minister (Nobby Leach) leave his post prematurely in 1968 (nothing was ever proven against Malfoy).

Abraxas’s son, Lucius, achieved notoriety as one of Lord Voldemort’s Death Eaters, though he successfully evaded prison after both of Lord Voldemort’s attempted coups. On the first occasion, he claimed to have been acting under the Imperius Curse (though many claimed he called in favours from high-placed Ministry officials); on the second occasion, he provided evidence against fellow Death Eaters and helped ensure the capture of many of Lord Voldemort’s followers who had fled into hiding.

Who is the richest person in Hogwarts?

Nicolas Flamel is easily the richest character in Harry Potter.

Who is the richest family in Hogwarts?

8 Lucius Malfoy – The Malfoy family comes from a long line of rich witches and wizards within Harry Potter, and Lucius Malfoy has copious amounts of money at his disposal. He resides in a gigantic mansion with his family, named Malfoy Manor, and owns some of Harry Potter’s most powerful objects, including a golden Time-Turner.

Asked By: James Sanders Date: created: May 17 2023

How did Dumbledore get all 3 Deathly Hallows

Answered By: Curtis Williams Date: created: May 20 2023

Known Masters of Death –

Ignotus Peverell mastered only one of the Hallows, but accepted the inevitability of death, which would make him an honorary Master of Death as per Albus Dumbledore ‘s interpretation of the title’s meaning. Albus Dumbledore possessed all three Hallows, but not at the same time. He mastered the Elder Wand, borrowed the Cloak of Invisibility from James Potter before giving it to Harry during his first year at Hogwarts, and found the Resurrection Stone in the Gaunt shack. He accepted his own death, also qualifying for his own definition.

However, it can also be implied as Dumbledore tried to bring his deceased family back with the help of Resurrection Stone so he didn’t consider himself as true master of death because he felt he didn’t accept death as inevitable. Though it could be possible Dumbledore wanted to see his parents and sister to make peace with them before he died.

Harry Potter possessed all three Hallows and accepted his own death. First, he inherited the Cloak of Invisibility from his father, James, Then, he inherited the Resurrection Stone from Dumbledore, which was inside a snitch, Finally, he won the Elder Wand from Draco Malfoy during the escape from Malfoy Manor, Even though he did not physically own every Hallow at the same time – by the time he physically possessed the Elder Wand, he had left the Resurrection Stone behind in the Forbidden Forest – he employed the use of all three directly and indirectly when he allowed Lord Voldemort to kill him: He was wearing the Cloak, using the Stone, and killed by the Wand, which Harry had already won. However, the true master didn’t only unite the Hallows. The true master must accept he would die, and when Harry went to his own death willingly while directly and indirectly possessing the Hallows, he became the Master of Death, because death never defeated him. All wands with Thestral tail hair cores, including the Elder Wand, would only work at their best for a wielder who had accepted death. Thus, one would need to be an honorary Master of Death (per Albus Dumbledore ‘s interpretation of the title’s meaning) in order to wield any Thestral tail hair wand at its best.

How did mundungus fletcher have an Invisibility Cloak?

People who have used invisibility cloaks –

Ignotus Peverell used the Cloak of Invisibility to hide from Death, Ignotus Peverell’s son was given the Cloak of Invisibility by Ignotus Peverell, James Potter owned an invisibility cloak (actually one of the fabled Deathly Hallows ) that he and his friends often used during their days at Hogwarts to assist them in their mischief. Albus Dumbledore had James’s cloak at the time of the latter’s death, having wished to inspect it further. He kept the cloak in his possession until Harry began school at Hogwarts in 1991. Harry Potter used his father’s cloak many times throughout his years at Hogwarts. He received it from Albus Dumbledore anonymously in 1991 as a Christmas present. Hermione Granger, Ron Weasley, Severus Snape and Luna Lovegood also used Harry Potter’s invisibility cloak. Barty Crouch, Jr., having escaped from Azkaban prison, was kept hidden by his father under an invisibility cloak at their home. He also watched the Quidditch World Cup in 1994 while under an invisibility cloak. Mundungus Fletcher was loaned an invisibility cloak by Mad-Eye Moody for Order of the Phoenix business. It is likely that Mundungus used the cloak for other, less reputable purposes. Mad-Eye Moody lent Sturgis Podmore his best invisibility cloak in 1995 to assist in guarding the Prophecy in the Department of Mysteries, He mentioned that Podmore had not had the manners to return it in a timely fashion and forced Moody to use his second best cloak. This was because Podmore had been placed under the Imperius Curse by Death Eaters,

How did Ignotus Peverell get the Invisibility Cloak?

The Cloak of Invisibility – ” Your father left this in my possession before he died. It is time it was returned to you. Use it well. ” — Harry Potter receiving the Cloak of Invisibility as a Christmas present The Tale of the Three Brothers, a wizarding legend, speaks of a Cloak of Invisibility which Xenophilius Lovegood characterised as one which “endures eternally, giving constant and impenetrable concealment, no matter what spells are cast at it.” Harry Potter receiving the Cloak of Invisibility during his first year at Hogwarts According to the legend, Ignotus Peverell was given the cloak by Death in the 13th century as a reward for having bested him. However, in his introduction to The Tales of Beedle the Bard, Albus Dumbledore speculated that its more likely that Ignotus and his brothers were highly talented wizards who created the Hallows themselves.

Whatever the truth, the cloak became a family heirloom and was inherited by Ignotus’s descendants, including James Potter and eventually his son, Harry Potter who was given it as a gift on Christmas day 1991, In 1997, Ron Weasley was the first to speculate that Harry’s cloak was the cloak of legend, since it was still in perfect condition despite being at least two generations old.

Other Invisibility Cloaks of similar age would have worn out or, at least, become less effective yet Harry’s remained as good as new. Ordinary cloaks would have, over time, become visible, ripped, had their enchantments worn off, or had been countered with other spells.

Asked By: Carl Young Date: created: Sep 18 2023

How did Harry survive Avada Kedavra in the forest

Answered By: Richard Perez Date: created: Sep 19 2023

Harry Potter is the only known person to have ever survived the killing curse in the franchise, and twice. How did he do it? Is he immortal now? Harry Potter was first released as a book series that had not even been completed (2007) before being made into a film franchise series in 2001. And yet in seven books and eight movies, no one but the title character himself has ever walked away from The Killing Curse (one of three Unforgivable Curses that causes instantaneous death), and Harry managed to do it twice.

  • This reputation even gave him the title of “The Boy Who Lived.” The Killing Curse (or Avada Kedavra ) is supposed to be a life-ending curse that no wizard, no matter how powerful, can undo.
  • Although the curse can be counteracted with Sacrificial Protection powered by love, once the damage is done there is no going back.

So how did Harry Potter not only survive this Unforgivable Curse with no more than a scratch, but also again a second time? When Harry was just a baby, his mother and father (Lily and James Potter) were killed when Voldemort came to end Harry’s life.

  • Voldemort was a great and powerful wizard, but he was evil and corrupted.
  • After a reading from Divination professor Sybill Trelawney that stated he would be defeated by a male child born at the end of July, Voldemort had two guesses as to who this child would be.
  • One was Neville Longbottom whom Voldemort sent Death Eaters after, and the other was Harry Potter whom Voldemort went to kill himself.

Voldemort said he did not want to waste perfectly good wizards, especially purebloods. His only mission was to kill the two potentials threats in his future so that he would never be challenged. This is why Voldemort even told Lily to step out of the way when he came to kill Harry; he told Lily she did not have to needlessly die.

Voldemort’s goal in life was to be the most powerful, threatening wizard of all time, and to always escape death. He never wanted to die, which is why he made six Horcruxes and went to kill Harry. But when Lily refused to step out of the way and protect her child at all costs, even her own life, that kind of love was not known to Voldemort.

It’s magic could not be understood. In order to create a Horcrux, a wizard must split their soul and hide a piece of it in an object in order to become immortal. To do this, they must first commit murder. Voldemort intentionally made six Horcruxes, but when he used Avada Kedavra on Harry, he unintentionally created a seventh Horcrux.

  1. Instead of dying, Lily’s love for Harry created a counter ‘curse’ known as Sacrificial Protection and saved Harry.
  2. This type of love and sacrifice is a blood curse, and will forever protect the life of the individual whom has been ‘cursed.’ So, when Voldemort attacked Harry with The Killing Curse after Lily died defending him, Harry’s protection curse caused the magic to bounce off (or rebound) and strike Voldemort, causing him to ‘die’ and lose his mortal body.

Until the fourth book and film, Voldemort is still trying to get back his physical form ( much like Sauron in Lord of the Rings ) but fails a few times before finally using Harry’s blood to bring back his body and regain full strength. When Voldemort returns for the finale of the series, he again uses Avada Kedavra on Harry. Because Voldemort’s soul was no longer fragmented —save for a large serpent named Nagini—he would soon be vulnerable enough to be killed for good. When Harry was struck, he was forced into a sort of Limbo reality where he encountered Dumbledore, who offered Harry a brief explanation of what had happened as well as a choice to go to his final resting place to be with his parents, or go back and finish off Voldemort.

  • Harry obviously chooses to continue living, and with the help of Neville (who was fulfilling his side of the prophecy by killing Nagini) Harry is able to end the reign of Voldemort for good.
  • Harry Potter was sort of immortal against Voldemort as long as he was alive and a threat.
  • With Voldemort dead, Lily’s love curse or spell would have fulfilled its purpose and no longer have been in effect,

Harry was the only known wizard to survive The Killing Curse, but it seems that if a similar situation occurred, where one sacrificed themself for another out of deep love and care, then they too could have that lasting protection against evil with the power of love.