Asked By: Oswald Young Date: created: Mar 13 2024

Who is favored to win the Women’s World Cup

Answered By: Aaron Simmons Date: created: Mar 16 2024

Women’s World Cup Winner Odds 2023 – The USWNT are the favorites in the World Cup betting odds, but they could face intense competition from European opposition:

  • England +333
  • Spain +400
  • U.S. +400
  • Japan +800
  • Germany +900
  • Australia +1000
  • Netherlands +1200
  • France +1200
  • Sweden +1800
  • Columbia +2800

Odds courtesy of DraftKings as of August 2, 2023.

Where is the FIFA World Cup 2023 schedule?

The 2023 Women’s World Cup in Australia and New Zealand was the first with an expanded 32-team field and 64 matches on the schedule. The tournament kicked off on July 20, 2023 in Auckland, New Zealand, with the final taking place on August 20 in Sydney, Australia, as Spain beat England 1-0.

What teams are in the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023?

FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 teams and groups

Group Teams
Group A New Zealand, Norway, Philippines, Switzerland
Group B Australia, Canada, Nigeria, Republic of Ireland
Group C Costa Rica, Japan, Spain, Zambia
Group D People’s Republic of China, Denmark, England, Haiti

Who has qualified for the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023?

How to watch the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 Round of 16 – For UK viewers, all fixtures are broadcast live on the BBC or ITV, as well as the broadcaster’s respective streaming services, iPlayer and ITVX. In the US, Fox are broadcasting all fixtures on their live channel, FOXSports.com and the FOX Sports App. GBR

Who is 3rd place in the World Cup 2023?

Fridolina Rolfo’s penalty and a strike from captain Kosovare Asllani secured Tokyo 2020 silver medallists Sweden another medal at a global tournament to silence the home crowd in Brisbane. (Getty Images 2023) Sweden defeated co-hosts Australia 2-0 in Brisbane on Saturday (19 August) to take third place at the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023, Fridolina Rolfo scored from the penalty spot after half an hour, and a second-half strike from Kosovare Asllani saw the Swedes secure another podium finish in a major tournament.

  1. This is the second consecutive third-place finish at a FIFA Women’s World Cup for Sweden.
  2. In 2019, they fell to the Netherlands in the semi-finals before beating England 2-1 in the play-off for third.
  3. Co-hosts Australia had to settle for fourth place, matching their best placing in a global competition at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games,

Australia missed out on a chance to compete in the FIFA Women’s World Cup final after a 3-1 semi-final loss to England’s Lionesses, and Sweden went down 2-1 to Spain,

FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 top goal-scorers: Race for the Golden Boot FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023: All fixtures, results, goalscorers, and group standings – complete list

Sweden have become all too familiar with narrowly missing out on a major tournament final. Having done so in 2019 and at last year’s European Championships, one could question whether a side still has the desire to battle it out for a third place. However, on Saturday the Swedes came out fighting once again.

  1. From kick-off The Blågult made it evident that they were hungry for another podium finish.
  2. Early chances from Stina Blackstenius hinted at Sweden’s dominance, but it was far from an easy match-up for the Tokyo 2020 silver medallists – in part due to Australia’s captain Sam Kerr,
  3. This was only the second game that Kerr started during her team’s FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 campaign.

The Chelsea forward had been sidelined with an injury, but started their semi-final against England in which she scored an incredible strike to give her nation a lifeline. Against Sweden, Kerr teamed up with Mary Fowler, Hayley Raso and Ellie Carpenter to produce several counter chances that tested Sweden’s goalkeeper Zecira Musovic, Sam Kerr looked in pain as she went down with an injury in the final minutes of Australia’s third-place play-off against Sweden. (2023 Getty Images) The beginning of the second half saw similar action, with Sweden successfully containing all Australian threats.

  1. A defensive blip from the hosts gifted Sweden the ball, which prompted a speedy counter attack.
  2. Blackstenius passed it to Kosovare Asllani who sent the ball into the bottom corner for Sweden’s second goal of the evening.
  3. From then on, Sweden’s chances kept coming with Arnold saving Australia on several occasions.

As the half progressed, it was experience that set these two sides apart. Sweden looked comfortable in controlling a third-place play-off while Australia looked jumpy, demonstrating their lack of involvement in matches of similar scale. Australia’s game went from bad to worse with 15 minutes to go as Kerr suffered a visibly painful knock and hobbled through the next few minutes of play while Sweden ran the clock down. Kosovare ASLLANI Football SWE

Who is the best player in the Women’s World Cup?

FIFA Women’s World Cup awards: Bonmati wins Golden Ball Spain midfielder named the tournament’s outstanding player following victory over England in the Sydney final. Following the conclusion of a thrilling FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023™ final, FIFA handed out the tournament’s individual awards.

Asked By: Matthew Taylor Date: created: Mar 08 2024

Who is most likely to win womens world cup 2023

Answered By: Rodrigo Ramirez Date: created: Mar 11 2024

Updated Odds to win 2023 Women’s World Cup

BetMGM (USA) SportsInteraction (Canada)
England +333 +350
USA +400 +447
Spain +400 +449
Japan +800 +801

Who is the best female World Cup team?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This article is about the women’s rankings. For the men’s rankings, see FIFA Men’s World Ranking,

Top 20 rankings as of 25 August 2023
Rank Change Team Points
1 2 Sweden 2069.17
2 4 Spain 2051.84
3 2 United States 2051.21
4 England 2030.14
5 France 2004.17
6 4 Germany 1987.67
7 2 Netherlands 1984.5
8 3 Japan 1961.35
9 1 Brazil 1949.41
10 3 Canada 1944.84
11 1 Australia 1882.88
12 1 Denmark 1859.47
13 1 Norway 1856.45
14 1 Iceland 1851.05
15 1 China 1819.59
16 2 Austria 1806.84
17 1 Italy 1795.18
18 1 Belgium 1793.53
19 2 Portugal 1785.78
20 3 South Korea 1773.93
*Change from 9 June 2023
Complete rankings at FIFA.com

The FIFA Women’s World Ranking is a ranking system for women’s national teams in association football (commonly known as football or soccer) published be the international governing body FIFA, As of August 2023, the Sweden national team is ranked #1.

The rankings were introduced in 2003, with the first rankings published on 16 July of that year. FIFA attempts to assess the strength of internationally active women’s national teams at any given time based on their past game results with the most successful teams being ranked highest. As of January 2023, the ranking has 185 national teams.

The ranking has more than informative value, as it is often used to seed member associations into different pots in international tournaments.

Who will perform at the World Cup 2023?

Titled ‘Do It Again,’ this vibrant anthem is a powerful collaboration between New Zealand alt-pop artist BENEE and Australian musician Mallrat, setting the stage for a celebration of women’s football brilliance.

Asked By: Robert Lee Date: created: Nov 23 2023

How many people attend the Women’s World Cup 2023

Answered By: Kevin Diaz Date: created: Nov 23 2023

Almost two million fans attended the Women’s World Cup in Australia and New Zealand – up by more than 600,000 on the previous record. The tournament, which Spain won for the first time, expanded to 64 games compared to 52 four years ago. However, the average attendance was 30,911 – up from 21,756 at the 2019 World Cup in France.

Fifa president Gianni Infantino had set a target of 1.5m ticket sales for 2023. The ninth edition, featuring 32 nations for the first time, exceeded expectations, according to Fifa chief women’s football officer Sarai Bareman. “This momentum is unstoppable,” she said. “The numbers and data and everything about this World Cup has eclipsed 2019.

“Over the past few weeks weeks we have witnessed record-breaking crowds, significant global broadcast audiences and staggering digital metrics, highlighting the truly global impact of this ground-breaking event.”

Spain beat England in World Cup final ‘Unstoppable’ Spain conquer world against the odds 25 great images from the World Cup

Why is Morocco shortened to Mar?

Morocco’s abbreviation MAR on TV coverage at the World Cup explained MOR YOU KNOW

  • Published : 12:00, 14 Dec 2022
  • Updated : 12:00, 14 Dec 2022

Morocco are relishing their dream run in Qatar with few predicting they would be gearing up for semi-final action against France. The Atlas Lions have become the first African team to reach the last four at a World Cup 1 Morocco knocked out Portugal to get to the World Cup semi-finals Credit: Getty

  • During what is only their second World Cup since 1998, have also vanquished former champions Spain and topped a group containing 2018 finalists Croatia and Europe’s number one ranked team Belgium.
  • Yet throughout the five games Walid Regragui’s men have played at this tournament, fans have noticed their abbreviation is not what they expected.
  • Throughout the TV coverage, Morocco’s shortened name reads ‘MAR’ on the scoreboard during their matches.
  • The first three alphabet letters of a country’s name are usually used for their broadcast abbreviation, such as ‘ENG’ for England.
  • However, Morocco is abbreviated as ‘MAR’ rather than ‘MOR’.
  • That is due to the continued large amount of French influence in the country, despite the official languages being Arabic and Berber.
  • Morocco only gained independence from France in 1956 and a number of French residents still remain in the African nation.
  • The French word for Morocco is Maroc, and from this, FIFA uses ‘MAR’ as the country’s official abbreviation for sporting events.
Asked By: Noah Brown Date: created: Nov 24 2023

How many countries are in the 2023 World Cup

Answered By: Matthew Evans Date: created: Nov 24 2023

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Asked By: Carl Perez Date: created: Jan 24 2024

How many countries are in FIFA women’s

Answered By: Devin Thomas Date: created: Jan 25 2024

32 nations will compete in the Women’s World Cup for the first time. Born as a 12-team tournament in 1991, it was expanded to include 16 countries at USA 1999 and 24 at Canada 2015.

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How are World Cup groups decided 2023?

READ MORE ON THE WOMEN’S WORLD CUP IN AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND – In the entirely likely event that two or more teams from the same group finish level on points after all three first-round games, the primary tiebreaker is goal difference. This is the simple calculation of the number of goals scored minus the number of goals conceded by one side across the entire group phase.

The team with the higher figure comes out on top. If all sides involved have an equal goal difference, the team with the higher number of total goals scored nudges ahead. When total group stage figures can’t separate two or more nations, the focus turns towards the specific encounters between the countries.

The sides in question are first ranked by the number of points won from matches between the nations concerned. If there is still nothing to separate them, the team with the superior goal difference from the head-to-head games advances before goals scored in this sequence of matches is examined.

Should the nations in question remain entangled even after their head-to-head records are scrutinised, officials will have to dust off FIFA’s ‘Fair Play’ criteria. During their final group game of the 2018 men’s World Cup, Japan’s coaching staff realised that their position in Group H would be decided by Fair Play points.

Trailing 1-0 to already-eliminated Poland, manager Akira Nishino instructed his players not to search for an equaliser but avoid another yellow card at all costs. Senegal lost to Colombia by the same scoreline and bowed out by virtue of an inferior disciplinary record.

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How many teams from Europe qualify for Women’s World Cup?

Tiebreakers – In the group stage, teams are ranked according to points (3 points for a win, 1 point for a draw, 0 points for a loss), and if tied on points, the following tiebreaking criteria are applied, in the order given, to determine the rankings (Regulations Article 13.01):

  1. Points in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  2. Goal difference in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  3. Goals scored in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  4. Away goals scored in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  5. If more than two teams are tied, and after applying all head-to-head criteria above, a subset of teams are still tied, all head-to-head criteria above are reapplied exclusively to this subset of teams;
  6. Goal difference in all group matches;
  7. Goals scored in all group matches;
  8. Away goals scored in all group matches;
  9. Wins in all group matches;
  10. Away wins in all group matches;
  11. Disciplinary points (red card = 3 points, yellow card = 1 point, expulsion for two yellow cards in one match = 3 points);
  12. UEFA coefficient for the group stage draw.

To determine the best three runners-up, the group standings are used, not taking into account any matches against sixth-placed teams. If teams are tied on points, the following tiebreaking criteria are applied (Regulations Article 14.04):

  1. Goal difference in all group matches;
  2. Goals scored in all group matches;
  3. Away goals scored in all group matches;
  4. Wins in all group matches;
  5. Away wins in all group matches;
  6. Disciplinary points (red card = 3 points, yellow card = 1 point, expulsion for two yellow cards in one match = 3 points);
  7. UEFA coefficient for the group stage draw.
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In the play-offs, the team that scores more goals in the second round match qualifies for the final tournament. If the score is level, extra time is played. If the score is remains level after extra time, the tie is decided by penalty shoot-out (Regulations Article 15.01).

  1. Points;
  2. Goal difference;
  3. Goals scored;
  4. Away goals scored;
  5. Wins;
  6. Away wins;
  7. Disciplinary points;
  8. UEFA coefficient for the group stage draw.

How many teams qualify from groups in Women’s World Cup?

How every team qualified from each Women’s World Cup group – ESPN

  • Group play in the is over, with nations 16 through to the knockout rounds.
  • Here, we take a look at how all eight groups finished up and the results which secured the top two places.
  • QUALIFIED FOR ROUND OF 16: Japan, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Norway, Australia, Nigeria, Netherlands, United States, England, Denmark, South Africa, France, Jamaica, Colombia, Morocco
  • EMLIMINATED: Costa Rica, Zambia, Republic of Ireland, Vietnam, Panama, New Zealand, Philippines, Canada, Portugal, China, Haiti, Italy, Argentina, Brazil, Germany, South Korea
Asked By: Lewis Moore Date: created: Mar 30 2024

What is the 3rd and 4th place play off

Answered By: Jesus Nelson Date: created: Apr 01 2024

Single elimination – A single-elimination (“knockout”) playoff pits the participants in one-game matches, with the loser being dropped from the competition. Single-elimination tournaments are often used in individual sports like tennis, In most tennis tournaments, the players are seeded against each other, and the winner of each match continues to the next round, all the way to the final.

When a playoff of this type involves the top four teams, it is sometimes known as the Shaughnessy playoff system, after Frank Shaughnessy, who first developed it for the International League of minor league baseball, Variations of the Shaughnessy system also exist, such as in the promotion playoffs held by League 1 of the British rugby league.

The League 1 playoff does not involve the top four teams; the team that tops the table after the Super 8s phase, which follows a single round-robin phase involving all league teams, is crowned champion and receives automatic promotion to the second-tier Championship, while the next four teams contest a knockout playoff for the second promotion place.

  • A nearly identical format, with the only difference being that the knockout stage followed a full home-and-away league season, was used by the second level of France’s rugby union system, Pro D2, through the 2016–17 season.
  • Since then, Pro D2 uses a six-team playoff with the winner earning automatic promotion to the Top 14 and the runner-up entering a playoff with the 13th-place team in Top 14 for the final place in the next season’s Top 14.

Some knockout tournaments include a third place playoff, a single match to decide which competitor or team will be credited with finishing in third and fourth place. The teams that compete in such third place games are usually the two losing semifinalists in a particular tournament.

Who is 3rd and 4th place in the World Cup 2023?

Sweden secure third place, with Australia having to settle for fourth. All attention now turns to Sydney tomorrow as England and Spain go head-to-head in search of their first World Cup.

Asked By: Mason Bailey Date: created: Jun 08 2024

What was the first FIFA World Cup trophy called

Answered By: Alexander Gonzalez Date: created: Jun 08 2024

The original trophy awarded to the winner of the FIFA World Cup depicts Nike, the Goddess of Victory, holding an octagonal vessel in her outstretched hands. The trophy was created in gold with a base in semi-precious stones, designed by a French sculptor, Abel Lafleur.

How many teams go through in women’s World Cup?

Overview – The FIFA Women’s World Cup is a professional association football (soccer) tournament contested by senior women’s national football teams, organised by FIFA, The tournament, held every four years and one year after the men’s World Cup, was first played in 1991 in China, and was expanded to 32 teams beginning with the 2023 edition.

  • The tournament is contested with eight round-robin groups followed by a knockout round for 16 teams.
  • The defending champions were the United States, who defeated the Netherlands 2–0 in the 2019 final,
  • The event took place over a period of a month, from 20 July to 20 August, in Australia and New Zealand.

This Women’s World Cup was the first co-hosted tournament, and also the first senior World Cup to be held across multiple confederations. In addition, it was the first senior tournament to be held in Oceania, the first Women’s World Cup in the Southern Hemisphere, and the third to be held in the Asia-Pacific region.

How many teams are in the Women’s World Cup finals?

What was the FIFA Women’s World Cup format? – The 32 teams were drawn into eight groups of four nations. The top two in each group advanced to the knockout rounds. The competition then moved onto a round of 16, quarterfinals, semifinals and final. The tournament was hosted by Australia and New Zealand from July 20 to Aug.20.

Who won the Women’s World Cup 2023 final?

2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup final

Stadium Australia in Sydney hosted the final.
Event 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup
Spain England
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/td> Date 20 August 2023 Venue Stadium Australia, Sydney Player of the Match Olga Carmona (Spain) Referee Tori Penso ( United States ) Attendance 75,784 Weather Clear night 14.3 °C (57.7 °F) 69% humidity ← 2019

The 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup final was an association football match that determined the winner of the 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup, The match was played at the Stadium Australia in Sydney, Australia, on 20 August 2023, and was contested by Spain and England,

  • It took place in front of 75,784 supporters, and Spain won the final 1–0 through a goal from Olga Carmona, assisted by Mariona Caldentey,
  • For both finalists, this was the first appearance in a Women’s World Cup final.
  • Both teams were looking to become only the second country to win both men’s and women’s World Cups – Germany accomplished the feat in 2003 – as well as become the first team representing UEFA to win the tournament since Germany in 2007,

This was the third all-European final in the Women’s World Cup, after the 1995 and 2003 finals, both of which were also contested between potential new champions.

Is England still in the Women’s World Cup?

England at the FIFA Women’s World Cup For the men’s team, see, have participated six times at the : in,,,,, and, They have reached the quarter-finals in each of their participation and the semi-finals three times, reaching in, English women celebrate third place at the 2015 World Cup.