Asked By: Ryan James Date: created: May 20 2023

Who is the artist on the new 20 note

Answered By: Henry Peterson Date: created: May 21 2023

Video report by ITV News Business and Economics Editor Joel Hills

The new £20 banknote featuring artist JMW Turner is now in circulation – and has been described by the Bank of England as its most secure note yet. The new polymer £20 note, replacing the paper note featuring economist Adam Smith, has never-before-seen features and can be ‘brought to life’. It includes two see-through windows and a two colour foil to help thwart counterfeiters.

ITV News at Ten presenter Rageh Omaar explains the features of the new £20 note

50p coins commemorate UK’s contribution to dinosaur discoveries Brexit 50p enters circulation

The Bank expects half of all ATMs across the UK to be dispensing polymer £20 banknotes in just two weeks’ time. Social app Snapchat has turned the new £20 note into a piece of live artwork, using augmented reality to animate the paintings of JMW Turner which appear on the new note.

JMW Turner’s much-loved The Fighting Temeraire will come to life on the new £20 note, thanks to a new AR lens by Snapchat. Credit: PA The son of a barber and a wig maker, Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) became renowned as one of the great masters of painting. He first exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1790 aged just 15.

Turner produced more than 550 oil paintings, 2,000 watercolours, and 30,000 sketches and drawings. He became known as “the painter of light” and had a keen interest in depicting nature such as extreme weather conditions and the violent power of the sea.

A large see-through window with a blue and gold foil appears on the front depicting Margate lighthouse and Turner Contemporary. The foil is silver on the back. The shape of the large window is based on the shape of the fountains in Trafalgar Square. A metallic hologram which changes between the word “twenty” and “pounds” when the note is tilted. Turner’s self-portrait, painted around 1799 and currently on display in Tate Britain. One of Turner’s most celebrated paintings The Fighting Temeraire – a tribute to the ship HMS Temeraire which played a distinguished role in Nelson’s victory at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805.

A large see-through window with a blue and gold foil on the front depicting Margate lighthouse. Credit: ITV News

A purple foil patch containing the letter “T” and based on the staircase at Tate Britain. A quote “Light is therefore colour” from an 1818 lecture by Turner referring to the use of light, shade, colour and tone in his pictures. Turner’s signature from his will, in which he bequeathed many of his paintings to the nation. The paper £20 notes can still be used as normal and the Bank will give six months’ notice ahead of their legal tender status being withdrawn.

The Governor of the Bank of England Mark Carney with the new £20 bank note. Credit: PA Laid end to end, two billion polymer £20 notes would stretch around the world almost seven times and weigh the equivalent of more than 141 double decker buses, the Bank said.

  1. The note will join the Sir Winston Churchill £5 and the Jane Austen £10 in the Bank of England’s first series of polymer notes.
  2. A new polymer £50 featuring Bletchley Park codebreaker Alan Turing will be issued next year.
  3. Speaking at Tate Britain, which houses the Turner Bequest, Bank of England Governor Mark Carney said: “Our banknotes celebrate the UK’s extraordinarily rich and diverse heritage and highlight the contributions of its greatest citizens.

Turner’s art was transformative. “I am delighted that the work of arguably the single most influential British artist of all time will now appear on another two billion works of art – the new £20 notes that people can start using today.” Turner’s self-portrait, as featured on the new £20 note, is on display at Tate Britain alongside the banknote.

  • Home to the Turner Bequest which includes 300 oil paintings and many thousands of sketches and watercolours, Tate Britain will present a major new exhibition dedicated to Turner later this year – Turner’s Modern World.
  • Turner’s self-portrait, as featured on the new £20 note, is on display at Tate Britain alongside the banknote.

Credit: ITV News The new £20 note is the first to feature the signature of Sarah John, the Bank’s chief cashier. She said: “Moving the £20 note to polymer marks a major step forward in our fight against counterfeiting. I am very grateful to everyone across the cash industry who has made this transition possible and I hope the public enjoy using their new Turner £20s.” The Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) has been working with the Bank to make money accessible for people with sight loss.

  1. The new note has tactile markings on it with three separate clusters of dots along the short edge to differentiate it from the £10 note, which has two clusters of dots.
  2. It is larger than both the £10 and £5 notes.
  3. David Clarke, RNIB director of services, said: “Handling cash can often be a challenge if you’re blind or partially sighted, because it can be difficult to tell the difference between the different notes and coins.

“By incorporating tactile features on money, we are closer to creating a more inclusive society; it’s the small changes that can make a big difference to independent living.” The Bank has said that polymer notes last longer than paper notes and remain in better condition.

Asked By: Francis Thomas Date: created: Dec 07 2023

Who is the man on the pound note

Answered By: Evan Anderson Date: created: Dec 09 2023

About Alan Turing – From the shortlist, the Governor chose Alan Turing. Front of the note Back of the note Alan Turing provided the theoretical underpinnings for the modern computer. While best known for his work devising code-breaking machines during WWII, Turing played a pivotal role in the development of early computers first at the National Physical Laboratory and later at the University of Manchester.

What is the new 20 pound note trick?

The secret Snapchat trick which reveals hidden painting in new £20 note

The new £20 note is here – and you can use Snapchat to see a hidden painting.Artist JMW Turner features on the note, which was revealed by the Bank of England last year in a bid to shift away from paper.The new note is a polymer note, like the £5 and £10 ones.Social media app Snapchat has turned the note into a piece of live artwork.It uses augmented reality to animate the paintings of JMW Turner – effectively bringing your note to life.The new £50 polymer note will arrive in the UK next year, featuring Bletchley Park codebreaker Alan Turing.But before that, the twenty pound note has arrived, hitting pockets, tills and cashpoints across the region from February 21.The note features a self-portrait of Turner and his iconic painting, The Fighting Temeraire.A new Snapchat filter lets you see a full colour, animated version of the painting on the note.

(Image: PA) It works in a similar way as when you use facial filters in the Snapchat app. Users will be able to bring the image on the note to life using a new Lens, which uses augmented reality to see a full colour, animated version of the painting. (Image: PA) It works by identifying the new note through a Snapchat user’s smartphone camera and overlaying the interactive images onto the banknote. Ed Couchman, from Snapchat’s parent company Snap, said: “The launch of the new £20 will result in Turner’s paintings being amongst the most widely distributed artworks in the UK, maybe even the world. (Image: PA) Sarah John, the Bank of England’s chief cashier, said: “We’re incredibly excited to launch the new polymer £20 note today and are pleased to be partnering with Snapchat to bring the note to life in an entirely novel way. “Turner is one of the most influential British artists and we’re now bringing his art to the pockets of people all over the UK.

Asked By: Jordan Adams Date: created: Aug 19 2023

Why is Adam Smith on the 20 pound note

Answered By: Gavin Butler Date: created: Aug 22 2023

The Bank of England has been issuing banknotes for over 300 years, since its inception in 1694. During that time, both the notes themselves and their role in society have undergone continual change. Gaining and maintaining public confidence in the currency is a key role of the Bank of England and one which is essential to the proper functioning of the economy.

The Adam Smith Series F £20 note was first issued in 2007. The note is 149mm x 80mm and is made of a strong paper produced from cotton and linen rags. Security features – a watermark and the metallic thread – are integrated into the paper itself, before any printing takes place. This note contains eight security features including raised print, metallic thread, a watermark, holographic strip, an ultra-violet feature, microlettering, specialist printing techniques, and a see-through register which is unique to this note.

The historical character featured on the note is Adam Smith (1723-1790), one of the fathers of modern economics. The note quotes his famous example of workers in a pin factory, which demonstrated the benefits created by the division of labour and ‘the great increase in the quantity of work that results’.

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Was Isaac Newton on a bank note?

This paper banknote was in circulation between 1978 and 1988. It was designed by Harry Eccleston and the Bank of England’s design team. Sir Isaac Newton was a British mathematician and physicist who discovered the laws of gravity and motion and invented calculus – a way of describing how things change.

Whose face is on the 50 note?

Analytics cookies – We use analytics cookies so we can keep track of the number of visitors to various parts of the site and understand how our website is used. For more information on how these cookies work please see our Cookie policy, We first issued our £50 on 23 June 2021. It features the scientist Alan Turing.

Who is on the 50 Lev note?

Elementary school Sesvetska Sopnica

Bulgarian currency – lev () Our intern from Bulgaria writes about currency of her country.

Bulgarian lev (“” is an old word for “” which translates as “lion”) is the official Bulgarian currency. It was introduced in 1885, a few years after Bulgaria declared independence from the Ottoman empire. One Bulgarian lev consists of 100 stotinki (coins) and is fixed to the Euro: 1 EUR = 1.96 BGN. You can find coins of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20 and 50 stotinki. They look more or less the same. On the tails’ side of the coin you can see Madara Rider. In the region of Shumen, some 20 meters above the ground a relief of a rider stabbing a lion is carved in the cliffs. The monument is dated in the 7th-8th century and is part of the UNESCO world heritage list since 1979. The coin of 1 lev was introduced later and in 2016 the 2 lev coin replaced the notes. The 1 lev coin has the image of Saint Ivan Rilski. Born in 874, he was one of the most famous monks in Bulgaria. After a lifetime of service to God and the church, helping the poor and sick, establishing one of the most beautiful Bulgarian monasteries – the Rila monastery, he died in 946 and was later proclaimed a saint. On the back of the 2 lev coin is the image of Saint Paisius of Hilendar – a monk who lived between 1722 and 1773 with incomparable contribution to the preservation of Bulgarian language, culture and identity. In the times when the Ottoman rule was already strong and both the Ottoman and Greek languages and culture were influential in all aspects of life, Paisus wrote Istoriya Slavyanobulgraska. Moving on to the banknotes, after the introduction of 2 lev coin, the first note is the 5 lev one. On the note you can find Ivan Milev Lalev. Born on 18 February 1897, he was a Bulgarian painter and scenographer. He is regarded as the founder of the Bulgarian Secession and a representative of Bulgarian modernism, combining symbolism, Art Nouveau and expressionism in his work. The 10 lev banknote shows Peter Beron. A medical doctor, philosopher, scientist, polyglot and pedagogue. It’s hard to summarize his contribution to science in a few lines. Spending most of his life in research and teaching abroad his activism for improvement of Bulgarian education never ceased. On the 20 lev note we find Stefan Stambolov. Born on 12 February 1854, he participated actively in preparation of the April and Stara Zagora uprisings against Ottoman rule. Despite being criticised for his dictatorial methods, he was among the initiators of the economical and cultural progress in Bulgaria before the Balkan Wars. On the 50 lev banknote is the image of Pencho Slaveykov. He was born in 1866 and after illness in his early years he was handicapped for life. Following in the footsteps of his father, Petko, he became a poet. He studied philosophy and was influenced by the works of Friedrich Nietzsche. Last but not least – the bank note of 100 lev has the image of Aleko Konstantinov. Konstantinov is one of the most popular Bulgarian writers, famous for his vividly described journeys around the world and his satirical stories. One of his most recognizable characters – Bai Ganyo – is a satirical illustration of the challenges many Bulgarians meet when interacting with Europeans.

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Who is going on the $5 note?

New Banknote Design | Media Releases The Reserve Bank has decided to update the $5 banknote to feature a new design that honours the culture and history of the First Australians. This new design will replace the portrait of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II.

  • The other side of the $5 banknote will continue to feature the Australian Parliament.
  • This decision by the Reserve Bank Board follows consultation with the Australian Government, which supports this change.
  • The Bank will consult with First Australians in designing the $5 banknote.
  • The new banknote will take a number of years to be designed and printed.

In the meantime, the current $5 banknote will continue to be issued. It will be able to be used even after the new banknote is issued.

Asked By: Bernard Watson Date: created: Jan 03 2024

Who is on $100 note

Answered By: Francis Campbell Date: created: Jan 05 2024

What’s on the New Banknote – The new $100 banknote has a range of new security features designed to keep the banknote secure from counterfeiting. The security features are similar to those on the $5, $10, $20 and $50 issued between 2016 and 2019. Each denomination in the new series of banknotes will feature a different species of Australian wattle and a native bird within a number of the security features.

The $100 banknote features the Acacia pycnantha and the Australian Masked Owl ( Tyto novaehollandiae ). The $100 banknote retains the portraits of Sir John Monash and Dame Nellie Melba, which are drawn from the same source photographs represented on the first polymer $100 banknote. The banknote celebrates the contributions of these two outstanding Australians.

Sir John Monash was an engineer, soldier and civic leader. He was a significant figure in the building-construction industry. Monash is also widely recognised for his service as a commander in the First World War. Dame Nellie Melba was an internationally renowned soprano who performed in Australia, Europe and the United States of America in the late 19th and early 20th century.

Is there a 100 British pound note?

History – The Royal Bank of Scotland began issuing £100 notes in 1727, the same year as the bank’s founding. Early banknotes were monochrome, and printed on one side only. The issuing of banknotes by Scottish banks was regulated by the Banknote (Scotland) Act 1845 until it was superseded by the Banking Act 2009,

Though strictly not legal tender in Scotland, Scottish banknotes are nevertheless legal currency and are generally accepted throughout the United Kingdom, Scottish banknotes are fully backed such that holders have the same level of protection as those holding genuine Bank of England notes, The £100 note is currently the largest denomination of banknote issued by The Royal Bank of Scotland.

The current Ilay series of banknotes was first issued in 1987. These banknotes feature a portrait of Lord Ilay, first governor of the bank, on the front. Lord Ilay’s image is also used as a watermark on the notes. Other design elements include the bank’s coat of arms and logo, the facade of Dundas House, the bank’s headquarters in Edinburgh, and a pattern representing the ceiling of the headquarters’ banking hall.

Are 50 notes still legal?

Brits are being urged to swap old notes for new legal tender after the Bank of England revealed there are still £9billion worth of old notes that haven’t been cashed in yet. September 30, 2022 was the last day that the Bank’s paper £20 and £50 banknotes had legal tender status. Post offices will be able to exchange old £5, £10, £20 or £50 notes up to £300worth at selected branches (Image: Gareth Fuller/PA Wire) While the Royal Mint also revealed that there are £87million worth of old £1 coins still in circulation. If you find old paper notes in your wallet or around the house don’t throw them out.

  1. All “genuine” banknotes that have been withdrawn from circulation can be swapped for a newer equivalent, as they still retain their face value, the Bank of England explained.
  2. You are able to swap notes at banks and some post offices.
  3. Post offices will be able to exchange old £5, £10, £20 or £50 notes up to £300worth at selected branches.

You can find your nearest branch offering the exchange service here and must bring photo ID. Barclays, Halifax, Nationwide, Lloyds, Santander and Natwest are among the banks and building societies where you can still exchange old paper notes. You can also exchange notes with the Bank of England by post,

  1. They explain: “Be aware the banknotes are sent at your own risk.
  2. So please take appropriate measures to insure against loss or theft.
  3. Please complete a postal exchange form for individuals or businesses (available below).
  4. Send it with your banknote(s) and photocopies of ID (one photo ID and one proof of address for your permanent home address even if this is outside of the UK) for any exchange (mandatory for any exchange of £700 or more) to Department NEX, Bank of England, Threadneedle Street, London EC2R 8AH.

“Please do not send original ID documents in the post to us. “We can pay your money into a bank account (this may take in excess of 30 days due to current volumes), by cheque or, if you live in the UK and your exchange is worth up to £300, in new banknotes.

Can you get fake 20 notes?

The most likely notes to be counterfeited are paper £20 notes and £50 notes. The following are simple tips to check paper notes Check the paper These notes are printed on special paper, so make sure you check how the paper feels. A genuine bank note has a cloth-like feel, while a fake note will feel more like paper.

Asked By: Morgan Cooper Date: created: Oct 05 2023

Are 20 pound notes still legal

Answered By: Xavier Jenkins Date: created: Oct 06 2023

What to do with old £20 notes – how to exchange old notes for new ones Old £20 and £50 paper notes stopped being legal tender in the UK on 30 September 2022. This means you can’t use them in shops or as payment any more. But, according to the Bank of England, there is around £6bn worth of £20 paper notes and over £8bn worth of paper £50 notes in circulation – that’s around 300 million individual £20 notes and 160 million £50 notes that haven’t been used before the notes were withdrawn from circulation.

Even though you can’t spend these old paper notes, it’s worth checking old bags, wallets and even the kids’ money boxes as you can still exchange old £20 and £50 notes. New polymer plastic notes are replacing paper ones as they are stronger – they will even survive in the washing machine should you accidentally leave some cash in your pocket.

They are also harder to counterfeit, helping the central Bank lock down on fraud. But what should you do if you come across any old ones? We look at what to do with old £20 and £50 paper notes and where to exchange them for new polymer versions. Subscribe to MoneyWeek today and get your first six magazine issues absolutely FREE Don’t miss the latest investment and personal finances news, market analysis, plus money-saving tips with our free twice-daily newsletter Don’t miss the latest investment and personal finances news, market analysis, plus money-saving tips with our free twice-daily newsletter

Asked By: Walter Barnes Date: created: Jul 08 2023

What is the rare 20 pound note number

Answered By: Cole Hall Date: created: Jul 08 2023

Special meanings in serial numbers – When the Jane Austen £5 notes came out in 2017 there was lots of interest in numbers that were linked to her life. For instance, collectors hunted for the serial numbers 16 121775 and 18 071817 because they are the author’s birth and death dates.

Also, the £20 notes released in 2020 feature artist JMW Turner, so serial numbers with his birth date – 1775 – could be a winner. If you find one starting with an A that also includes his birth date that should be worth even more. One special serial number to keep an eye out for is 1775 1851 which combines the painter’s birth and death date.

A note starting with JT could be valuable in theory, but there would have to be a lot of notes printed to reach this, so the notes are unlikely to end up in circulation. There are also sets of serial numbers that always prove popular regardless of who is on the note, for instance 007 for James Bond or AK47.

Why is Kate Cranston on a 20 note?

Royal Bank of Scotland has unveiled the design of its first £20 polymer note. Featuring the image of historic Scottish entrepreneur Kate Cranston, the note was revealed at her legendary tearoom in Glasgow – Mackintosh at the Willow. Kate Cranston, from Glasgow, made her mark for her series of tearooms across the city.

Her flagship venue at 217 Sauchiehall Street, is celebrated by architects and designers due to the interior designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Designed in partnership with Scottish arts’ organisations and designers including Graven Images, Nile, Stucco, Timorous Beasties, O’Street and the Glasgow School of Art, the note, which will enter circulation in 2020, will be the first £20 Scottish banknote to feature a woman other than the Queen, on its front.

The £20 is the third in a series of ‘Fabric of Nature’ themed notes made from De La Rue’s Safeguard® polymer material and will also contain a variety of new security features, making it difficult to counterfeit but easy to authenticate. Commenting at the launch, Celia Sinclair, Chair of the Willow Tea Room Trust, said: “We are delighted that the image of Kate Cranston is on the Royal Bank of Scotland £20 note.

  1. She was a very interesting and intelligent woman, an excellent businesswoman who changed attitudes.
  2. The Salon de Luxe, the centrepiece of Mackintosh at the Willow, was a symbol of social change in Glasgow where women began to socialise outside the home.
  3. She was serious about training – she ran all of her own courses and all her staff had to toe the line.

She grew her own flowers for the tearooms, fresh foods were supplied by her own dairy. I think there were many women like Kate Cranston around at that time, but history simply doesn’t remember them, but now I am glad to say we are with this very fitting tribute.” People’s Money programme In designing the new notes, Royal Bank of Scotland launched the People’s Money programme and engaged with thousands of people across Scotland through workshops, online communities and polling surveys.

As a result, ‘Fabric of Nature’ was chosen as the theme. The choice of Kate Cranston to feature on the £20 note was taken by the Royal Bank of Scotland Scottish Board. Speaking at the launch, Malcolm Buchanan, chair, Scotland Board, Royal Bank of Scotland, said: “At Royal Bank of Scotland, we feel that a banknote’s value is more than just the figure printed across its front – it is our symbol which lives in people’s pockets and touches everyday lives.

“Kate Cranston’s legacy touches so many aspects of Scottish life that we, as a nation, are justifiably proud; entrepreneurialism, art, philanthropy and dedication. Choosing the design of the £20 note was an important decision for it is Royal Bank of Scotland’s biggest circulating note, with £736m currently in circulation.

As such, it is fitting that such a figure as Kate Cranston will be celebrated on the face of our most popular note.” Fabric of Nature In keeping with the Fabric of Nature theme, the new £20 features illustrations of red squirrels on its reverse and also features the blaeberry fruit. It also includes extracts from 16th century Scottish poet Mark Alexander Boyd’s work, Cupid and Venus.

The new note will carry the same exclusive weave pattern developed by textile designers Alistair McDade and Elspeth Anderson for the £5 and £10 polymer notes. The red squirrels on a tree illustration for the £20 follow mackerel in the sea on the £5, and otters on the shore for the £10.

Kate Cranston, from Glasgow, made her mark with her series of tearooms across the city. Her flagship venue at 217 Sauchiehall Street, is celebrated by architects and designers due to the interior designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. The tearooms made a cultural impact during her life due to offering venues where women could enter unchaperoned.

Following her death in 1934, her fortune was left to support the poor and the homeless in the city. The polymer £20 note is set for issue in 2020 and will follow the £5 polymer note, which was launched in 2016 and features poet Nan Shepherd, and the £10 polymer which was launched in 2017 and includes the portrait of scientist Mary Somerville.

Asked By: Wallace Torres Date: created: May 27 2023

Why is Mary on the $20 dollar note

Answered By: Curtis Gonzales Date: created: May 27 2023

Who’s who on the $20 banknote – Mary Reibey built substantial business interests in property and shipping operations. Having assumed responsibility for her husband’s enterprises after his death in 1811 and subsequently expanding them, Reibey earned a reputation as an astute and successful businesswoman in the colony of New South Wales.

In later life, she became known for her charitable work and interest in the church and education. Images of the schooner Mercury and a building in George Street, Sydney, both of which Reibey owned, are shown on the banknote. Reverend John Flynn pioneered the world’s first aerial medical service, now known as the Royal Flying Doctor Service.

Flynn was instrumental in establishing the Presbyterian Church’s Australian Inland Mission, a network of nursing hostels. Keenly aware of the isolation of the people of inland Australia, he believed that a ‘mantle of safety’ could only be created through an aerial medical service and the introduction of radio communications.

Who is the male on a 20 note?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Twenty pounds

(United Kingdom)
Value £20 sterling
Width 139 mm
Height 73 mm
Security features See-through windows the larger one with a purple border and the Queen’s portrait, blue and gold foil on the front, silver foil on the back in the shape of Margate lighthouse, smaller window at the bottom right corner, raised dots, finely detailed round purple metallic image containing the letter “T”, blue and pink foil patch with a 3D image of the Coronation Crown, micro lettering, textured print, UV feature, hologram
Material used Polymer
Years of printing 1725–1943; 1970–1991; 1991-2000; 1999-2007; 2007-2020; 2020–present (current design)
Obverse
Design Queen Elizabeth II
Design date 20 February 2020
Reverse
Design J.M.W. Turner
Design date 20 February 2020

The Bank of England £20 note is a sterling banknote. It is the second-highest denomination of banknote currently issued by the Bank of England, The current polymer note, first issued on 20 February 2020, bears the image of Queen Elizabeth II on the obverse and the image of painter J.M.W.

Asked By: Alan Martin Date: created: May 27 2023

Is Jane Austen on a bank note

Answered By: Edward Green Date: created: May 28 2023

Jane Austen’s 10-pound bank note, not without irony, is revealed Jane Austen on the 10-pound bank note. Jane Austen has been gone for 200 years, but she’s getting back in circulation. A new 10-pound note featuring her image was unveiled Tuesday by the Bank of England. Austen is the first female author to appear on a British bank note.

But she’s the third British writer to appear on the 10-pound note, joining Charles Dickens and Charles Darwin. The note, which will enter circulation Sept.14, was unveiled at Winchester Cathedral on the 200th anniversary of Austen’s death at age 41,, The bank note also features images of Queen Elizabeth II; Austen’s writing desk; her brother’s house, Godmersham Park, which is said to have inspired many of her books; and Elizabeth Bennet, the hero of one of her most famous novels, “Pride and Prejudice.” It includes one quote from one of Jane Austen’s books, “Pride and Prejudice”: “I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading!” That line is not as simple as it seems.

In the novel, it is spoken by Miss Caroline Bingley, Bennet’s rival for the affection of the serious and wealthy Mr. Darcy. The Guardian notes that the choice of quotation is odd: Bingley isn’t actually a fan of literature — she’s pretending to be a book lover to catch Darcy’s attention. Fans in Regency-era dress with the new Jane Austen bank note. After the Austen-themed banknote was announced in 2013, it drew criticism from Austen experts who thought the image of the author was “airbrushed” and “prettied up.” Paula Byrne, an author who has written three books about Austen, called the portrait on the bank note a “19th-century airbrushed makeover.” She, “It makes me quite angry, as it’s been prettied up for the Victorian era, when Jane Austen was very much a woman of Georgian character,” Byrne said.

“The costume is wrong and the image creates a myth Austen was a demure spinster and not a deep-thinking author.” Get the latest news, events and more from the Los Angeles Times Book Club, and help us get L.A. reading and talking. You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

: Jane Austen’s 10-pound bank note, not without irony, is revealed

Asked By: Logan Gonzalez Date: created: Apr 04 2024

What is the oldest bank note in the world

Answered By: John Bell Date: created: Apr 06 2024

Oldest banknote Who Da Ming tongxing baochao The oldest surviving banknotes are examples of the “Da Ming tongxing baochao” (Great Ming Circulating Treasure Note), which were first printed during the reign of the Hongwu Emperor (1368–1398) – probably no earlier than 1375.

These banknotes were not the first to circulate in China (similar promissory notes had been commonly issued since around AD 997), but they are thought to be the oldest to survive into the present day. The reason for the survival of these banknotes (they are actually quite common, with hundreds of examples existing in the collections of museums around the world) lies in the catastrophic hyperinflation of the early Ming Dynasty, which saw the value of each note plunge to around 1% of its original value by the 1420s.

As this hyperinflation progressed, Chinese merchants went from needing only a few notes to needing bundles of them. When the currency collapsed in the mid-15th century, huge bales of now-useless banknotes were stuffed into jars, or wooden boxes, or left in old buildings and forgotten.

It is possible that there are older Chinese banknotes in existence, but their current whereabouts are unknown. In 1915, for example, the American numismatist and antiquarian Andrew McFarland Davis (1833–1920) gave a presentation to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences that included photographs (reproduced in the official transcript) of Song Dynasty “Huizi” banknotes (c.1165) from his personal collection.

Davis died in 1920 and what happened to these notes is not known. Similarly, it was reported in 1987 that a Yuan Dynasty banknote from the 1330s had been found in the archives of the Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg, but this note (if it ever existed) appears to have vanished some time in the 1990s.

Asked By: Jason Barnes Date: created: Sep 08 2023

Was Sir Isaac Newton rich or poor

Answered By: Rodrigo King Date: created: Sep 11 2023

Biography – Isaac Newton ‘s life can be divided into three quite distinct periods. The first is his boyhood days from 1643 up to his appointment to a chair in 1669, The second period from 1669 to 1687 was the highly productive period in which he was Lucasian professor at Cambridge. The third period ( nearly as long as the other two combined ) saw Newton as a highly paid government official in London with little further interest in mathematical research. Isaac Newton was born in the manor house of Woolsthorpe, near Grantham in Lincolnshire. Although by the calendar in use at the time of his birth he was born on Christmas Day 1642, we give the date of 4 January 1643 in this biography which is the “corrected” Gregorian calendar date bringing it into line with our present calendar. ( The Gregorian calendar was not adopted in England until 1752,) Isaac Newton came from a family of farmers but never knew his father, also named Isaac Newton, who died in October 1642, three months before his son was born. Although Isaac’s father owned property and animals which made him quite a wealthy man, he was completely uneducated and could not sign his own name. You can see a picture of Woolsthorpe Manor as it is now at THIS LINK, Isaac’s mother Hannah Ayscough remarried Barnabas Smith the minister of the church at North Witham, a nearby village, when Isaac was two years old. The young child was then left in the care of his grandmother Margery Ayscough at Woolsthorpe. Basically treated as an orphan, Isaac did not have a happy childhood. His grandfather James Ayscough was never mentioned by Isaac in later life and the fact that James left nothing to Isaac in his will, made when the boy was ten years old, suggests that there was no love lost between the two. There is no doubt that Isaac felt very bitter towards his mother and his step-father Barnabas Smith. When examining his sins at age nineteen, Isaac listed:- Threatening my father and mother Smith to burn them and the house over them. Upon the death of his stepfather in 1653, Newton lived in an extended family consisting of his mother, his grandmother, one half-brother, and two half-sisters. From shortly after this time Isaac began attending the Free Grammar School in Grantham. Although this was only five miles from his home, Isaac lodged with the Clark family at Grantham. However he seems to have shown little promise in academic work. His school reports described him as ‘idle’ and ‘inattentive’. His mother, by now a lady of reasonable wealth and property, thought that her eldest son was the right person to manage her affairs and her estate. Isaac was taken away from school but soon showed that he had no talent, or interest, in managing an estate. An uncle, William Ayscough, decided that Isaac should prepare for entering university and, having persuaded his mother that this was the right thing to do, Isaac was allowed to return to the Free Grammar School in Grantham in 1660 to complete his school education. This time he lodged with Stokes, who was the headmaster of the school, and it would appear that, despite suggestions that he had previously shown no academic promise, Isaac must have convinced some of those around him that he had academic promise. Some evidence points to Stokes also persuading Isaac’s mother to let him enter university, so it is likely that Isaac had shown more promise in his first spell at the school than the school reports suggest. Another piece of evidence comes from Isaac’s list of sins referred to above. He lists one of his sins as:-, setting my heart on money, learning, and pleasure more than Thee, which tells us that Isaac must have had a passion for learning. We know nothing about what Isaac learnt in preparation for university, but Stokes was an able man and almost certainly gave Isaac private coaching and a good grounding. There is no evidence that he learnt any mathematics, but we cannot rule out Stokes introducing him to Euclid ‘s Elements which he was well capable of teaching ( although there is evidence mentioned below that Newton did not read Euclid before 1663), Anecdotes abound about a mechanical ability which Isaac displayed at the school and stories are told of his skill in making models of machines, in particular of clocks and windmills. However, when biographers seek information about famous people there is always a tendency for people to report what they think is expected of them, and these anecdotes may simply be made up later by those who felt that the most famous scientist in the world ought to have had these skills at school. Newton entered his uncle’s old College, Trinity College Cambridge, on 5 June 1661, He was older than most of his fellow students but, despite the fact that his mother was financially well off, he entered as a sizar, A sizar at Cambridge was a student who received an allowance toward college expenses in exchange for acting as a servant to other students. There is certainly some ambiguity in his position as a sizar, for he seems to have associated with “better class” students rather than other sizars. Westfall ( see or ) has suggested that Newton may have had Humphrey Babington, a distant relative who was a Fellow of Trinity, as his patron. This reasonable explanation would fit well with what is known and mean that his mother did not subject him unnecessarily to hardship as some of his biographers claim. Newton’s aim at Cambridge was a law degree. Instruction at Cambridge was dominated by the philosophy of Aristotle but some freedom of study was allowed in the third year of the course. Newton studied the philosophy of Descartes, Gassendi, Hobbes, and in particular Boyle, The mechanics of the Copernican astronomy of Galileo attracted him and he also studied Kepler ‘s Optics, He recorded his thoughts in a book which he entitled Quaestiones Quaedam Philosophicae Certain philosophical questions “>Ⓣ, It is a fascinating account of how Newton’s ideas were already forming around 1664, He headed the text with a Latin statement meaning ” Plato is my friend, Aristotle is my friend, but my best friend is truth” showing himself a free thinker from an early stage. How Newton was introduced to the most advanced mathematical texts of his day is slightly less clear. According to de Moivre, Newton’s interest in mathematics began in the autumn of 1663 when he bought an astrology book at a fair in Cambridge and found that he could not understand the mathematics in it. Attempting to read a trigonometry book, he found that he lacked knowledge of geometry and so decided to read Barrow ‘s edition of Euclid ‘s Elements, The first few results were so easy that he almost gave up but he:-, changed his mind when he read that parallelograms upon the same base and between the same parallels are equal. Returning to the beginning, Newton read the whole book with a new respect. He then turned to Oughtred ‘s Clavis Mathematica The key of mathematics “>Ⓣ and Descartes ‘ La Géométrie Geometry “>Ⓣ, The new algebra and analytical geometry of Viète was read by Newton from Frans van Schooten ‘s edition of Viète ‘s collected works published in 1646, Other major works of mathematics which he studied around this time was the newly published major work by van Schooten Geometria a Renato Des Cartes Geometry of Descartes “>Ⓣ which appeared in two volumes in 1659 – 1661, The book contained important appendices by three of van Schooten ‘s disciples, Jan de Witt, Johan Hudde, and Hendrick van Heuraet, Newton also studied Wallis ‘s Algebra and it appears that his first original mathematical work came from his study of this text. He read Wallis ‘s method for finding a square of equal area to a parabola and a hyperbola which used indivisibles. Newton made notes on Wallis ‘s treatment of series but also devised his own proofs of the theorems writing:- Thus Wallis doth it, but it may be done thus, It would be easy to think that Newton’s talent began to emerge on the arrival of Barrow to the Lucasian chair at Cambridge in 1663 when he became a Fellow at Trinity College. Certainly the date matches the beginnings of Newton’s deep mathematical studies. However, it would appear that the 1663 date is merely a coincidence and that it was only some years later that Barrow recognised the mathematical genius among his students. Despite some evidence that his progress had not been particularly good, Newton was elected a scholar on 28 April 1664 and received his bachelor’s degree in April 1665, It would appear that his scientific genius had still not emerged, but it did so suddenly when the plague closed the University in the summer of 1665 and he had to return to Lincolnshire. There, in a period of less than two years, while Newton was still under 25 years old, he began revolutionary advances in mathematics, optics, physics, and astronomy. While Newton remained at home he laid the foundations for differential and integral calculus, several years before its independent discovery by Leibniz, The ‘method of fluxions’, as he termed it, was based on his crucial insight that the integration of a function is merely the inverse procedure to differentiating it. Taking differentiation as the basic operation, Newton produced simple analytical methods that unified many separate techniques previously developed to solve apparently unrelated problems such as finding areas, tangents, the lengths of curves and the maxima and minima of functions. Newton’s De Methodis Serierum et Fluxionum On methods of series and on fluxions “>Ⓣ was written in 1671 but Newton failed to get it published and it did not appear in print until John Colson produced an English translation in 1736, When the University of Cambridge reopened after the plague in 1667, Newton put himself forward as a candidate for a fellowship. In October he was elected to a minor fellowship at Trinity College but, after being awarded his Master’s Degree, he was elected to a major fellowship in July 1668 which allowed him to dine at the Fellows’ Table. In July 1669 Barrow tried to ensure that Newton’s mathematical achievements became known to the world. He sent Newton’s text De Analysi to Collins in London writing:- brought me the other day some papers, wherein he set down methods of calculating the dimensions of magnitudes like that of Mr Mercator concerning the hyperbola, but very general; as also of resolving equations; which I suppose will please you; and I shall send you them by the next. Collins corresponded with all the leading mathematicians of the day so Barrow ‘s action should have led to quick recognition. Collins showed Brouncker, the President of the Royal Society, Newton’s results ( with the author’s permission ) but after this Newton requested that his manuscript be returned. Collins could not give a detailed account but de Sluze and Gregory learnt something of Newton’s work through Collins, Barrow resigned the Lucasian chair in 1669 to devote himself to divinity, recommending that Newton ( still only 27 years old ) be appointed in his place. Shortly after this Newton visited London and twice met with Collins but, as he wrote to Gregory :-, having no more acquaintance with him I did not think it becoming to urge him to communicate anything. Newton’s first work as Lucasian Professor was on optics and this was the topic of his first lecture course begun in January 1670, He had reached the conclusion during the two plague years that white light is not a simple entity. Every scientist since Aristotle had believed that white light was a basic single entity, but the chromatic aberration in a telescope lens convinced Newton otherwise. When he passed a thin beam of sunlight through a glass prism Newton noted the spectrum of colours that was formed. He argued that white light is really a mixture of many different types of rays which are refracted at slightly different angles, and that each different type of ray produces a different spectral colour. Newton was led by this reasoning to the erroneous conclusion that telescopes using refracting lenses would always suffer chromatic aberration. He therefore proposed and constructed a reflecting telescope. In 1672 Newton was elected a fellow of the Royal Society after donating a reflecting telescope. Also in 1672 Newton published his first scientific paper on light and colour in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, The paper was generally well received but Hooke and Huygens objected to Newton’s attempt to prove, by experiment alone, that light consists of the motion of small particles rather than waves. The reception that his publication received did nothing to improve Newton’s attitude to making his results known to the world. He was always pulled in two directions, there was something in his nature which wanted fame and recognition yet another side of him feared criticism and the easiest way to avoid being criticised was to publish nothing. Certainly one could say that his reaction to criticism was irrational, and certainly his aim to humiliate Hooke in public because of his opinions was abnormal. However, perhaps because of Newton’s already high reputation, his corpuscular theory reigned until the wave theory was revived in the 19 th century. Newton’s relations with Hooke deteriorated further when, in 1675, Hooke claimed that Newton had stolen some of his optical results. Although the two men made their peace with an exchange of polite letters, Newton turned in on himself and away from the Royal Society which he associated with Hooke as one of its leaders. He delayed the publication of a full account of his optical researches until after the death of Hooke in 1703, Newton’s Opticks appeared in 1704, It dealt with the theory of light and colour and with

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investigations of the colours of thin sheets ‘Newton’s rings’ and diffraction of light.

To explain some of his observations he had to use a wave theory of light in conjunction with his corpuscular theory. Another argument, this time with the English Jesuits in Liège over his theory of colour, led to a violent exchange of letters, then in 1678 Newton appears to have suffered a nervous breakdown. His mother died in the following year and he withdrew further into his shell, mixing as little as possible with people for a number of years. Newton’s greatest achievement was his work in physics and celestial mechanics, which culminated in the theory of universal gravitation. By 1666 Newton had early versions of his three laws of motion. He had also discovered the law giving the centrifugal force on a body moving uniformly in a circular path. However he did not have a correct understanding of the mechanics of circular motion. Newton’s novel idea of 1666 was to imagine that the Earth’s gravity influenced the Moon, counter- balancing its centrifugal force. From his law of centrifugal force and Kepler ‘s third law of planetary motion, Newton deduced the inverse-square law. In 1679 Newton corresponded with Hooke who had written to Newton claiming:-, that the Attraction always is in a duplicate proportion to the Distance from the Center Reciprocall, M Nauenberg writes an account of the next events:- After his 1679 correspondence with Hooke, Newton, by his own account, found a proof that Kepler’s areal law was a consequence of centripetal forces, and he also showed that if the orbital curve is an ellipse under the action of central forces then the radial dependence of the force is inverse square with the distance from the centre. This discovery showed the physical significance of Kepler ‘s second law. In 1684 Halley, tired of Hooke ‘s boasting :-, asked Newton what orbit a body followed under an inverse square force, and Newton replied immediately that it would be an ellipse. However in ‘De Motu.’ he only gave a proof of the converse theorem that if the orbit is an ellipse the force is inverse square. The proof that inverse square forces imply conic section orbits is sketched in Cor.1 to Prop.13 in Book 1 of the second and third editions of the ‘Principia’, but not in the first edition. Halley persuaded Newton to write a full treatment of his new physics and its application to astronomy. Over a year later (1687) Newton published the Philosophiae naturalis principia mathematica Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy “>Ⓣ or Principia as it is always known. The Principia is recognised as the greatest scientific book ever written. Newton analysed the motion of bodies in resisting and non-resisting media under the action of centripetal forces. The results were applied to orbiting bodies, projectiles, pendulums, and free-fall near the Earth. He further demonstrated that the planets were attracted toward the Sun by a force varying as the inverse square of the distance and generalised that all heavenly bodies mutually attract one another. Further generalisation led Newton to the law of universal gravitation:-, all matter attracts all other matter with a force proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. Newton explained a wide range of previously unrelated phenomena: the eccentric orbits of comets, the tides and their variations, the precession of the Earth’s axis, and motion of the Moon as perturbed by the gravity of the Sun. This work made Newton an international leader in scientific research. The Continental scientists certainly did not accept the idea of action at a distance and continued to believe in Descartes ‘ vortex theory where forces work through contact. However this did not stop the universal admiration for Newton’s technical expertise. James II became king of Great Britain on 6 February 1685, He had become a convert to the Roman Catholic church in 1669 but when he came to the throne he had strong support from Anglicans as well as Catholics. However rebellions arose, which James put down but he began to distrust Protestants and began to appoint Roman Catholic officers to the army. He then went further, appointing only Catholics as judges and officers of state. Whenever a position at Oxford or Cambridge became vacant, the king appointed a Roman Catholic to fill it. Newton was a staunch Protestant and strongly opposed to what he saw as an attack on the University of Cambridge. When the King tried to insist that a Benedictine monk be given a degree without taking any examinations or swearing the required oaths, Newton wrote to the Vice-Chancellor:- Be courageous and steady to the Laws and you cannot fail. The Vice-Chancellor took Newton’s advice and was dismissed from his post. However Newton continued to argue the case strongly preparing documents to be used by the University in its defence. However William of Orange had been invited by many leaders to bring an army to England to defeat James. William landed in November 1688 and James, finding that Protestants had left his army, fled to France. The University of Cambridge elected Newton, now famous for his strong defence of the university, as one of their two members to the Convention Parliament on 15 January 1689, This Parliament declared that James had abdicated and in February 1689 offered the crown to William and Mary. Newton was at the height of his standing – seen as a leader of the university and one of the most eminent mathematicians in the world. However, his election to Parliament may have been the event which let him see that there was a life in London which might appeal to him more than the academic world in Cambridge. After suffering a second nervous breakdown in 1693, Newton retired from research. The reasons for this breakdown have been discussed by his biographers and many theories have been proposed: chemical poisoning as a result of his alchemy experiments; frustration with his researches; the ending of a personal friendship with Fatio de Duillier, a Swiss-born mathematician resident in London; and problems resulting from his religious beliefs. Newton himself blamed lack of sleep but this was almost certainly a symptom of the illness rather than the cause of it. There seems little reason to suppose that the illness was anything other than depression, a mental illness he must have suffered from throughout most of his life, perhaps made worse by some of the events we have just listed. Newton decided to leave Cambridge to take up a government position in London becoming Warden of the Royal Mint in 1696 and Master in 1699, However, he did not resign his positions at Cambridge until 1701, As Master of the Mint, adding the income from his estates, we see that Newton became a very rich man. For many people a position such as Master of the Mint would have been treated as simply a reward for their scientific achievements. Newton did not treat it as such and he made a strong contribution to the work of the Mint. He led it through the difficult period of recoinage and he was particularly active in measures to prevent counterfeiting of the coinage. In 1703 he was elected president of the Royal Society and was re-elected each year until his death. He was knighted in 1705 by Queen Anne, the first scientist to be so honoured for his work. However the last portion of his life was not an easy one, dominated in many ways with the controversy with Leibniz over which of them had invented the calculus. Given the rage that Newton had shown throughout his life when criticised, it is not surprising that he flew into an irrational temper directed against Leibniz, We have given details of this controversy in Leibniz ‘s biography and refer the reader to that article for details. Perhaps all that is worth relating here is how Newton used his position as President of the Royal Society, In this capacity he appointed an “impartial” committee to decide whether he or Leibniz was the inventor of the calculus. He wrote the official report of the committee ( although of course it did not appear under his name ) which was published by the Royal Society, and he then wrote a review ( again anonymously ) which appeared in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, Newton’s assistant Whiston had seen his rage at first hand. He wrote:- Newton was of the most fearful, cautious and suspicious temper that I ever knew.

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Are Turner 20 notes still legal tender?

Turner, and polymer £50 notes featuring Alan Turing. After 30 September 2022, the new polymer notes will be the only ones with legal tender status. After 30 September 2022 people with a UK bank account will still be able to deposit withdrawn notes into their account.

Is the Turner 20 pound note?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Twenty pounds

(United Kingdom)
Value £20 sterling
Width 139 mm
Height 73 mm
Security features See-through windows the larger one with a purple border and the Queen’s portrait, blue and gold foil on the front, silver foil on the back in the shape of Margate lighthouse, smaller window at the bottom right corner, raised dots, finely detailed round purple metallic image containing the letter “T”, blue and pink foil patch with a 3D image of the Coronation Crown, micro lettering, textured print, UV feature, hologram
Material used Polymer
Years of printing 1725–1943; 1970–1991; 1991-2000; 1999-2007; 2007-2020; 2020–present (current design)
Obverse
Design Queen Elizabeth II
Design date 20 February 2020
Reverse
Design J.M.W. Turner
Design date 20 February 2020

The Bank of England £20 note is a sterling banknote. It is the second-highest denomination of banknote currently issued by the Bank of England, The current polymer note, first issued on 20 February 2020, bears the image of Queen Elizabeth II on the obverse and the image of painter J.M.W.

Asked By: Connor Nelson Date: created: Sep 29 2023

Are paper 20 pounds still legal

Answered By: Tyler Bailey Date: created: Oct 02 2023

What to do with old £20 notes – how to exchange old notes for new ones Old £20 and £50 paper notes stopped being legal tender in the UK on 30 September 2022. This means you can’t use them in shops or as payment any more. But, according to the Bank of England, there is around £6bn worth of £20 paper notes and over £8bn worth of paper £50 notes in circulation – that’s around 300 million individual £20 notes and 160 million £50 notes that haven’t been used before the notes were withdrawn from circulation.

Even though you can’t spend these old paper notes, it’s worth checking old bags, wallets and even the kids’ money boxes as you can still exchange old £20 and £50 notes. New polymer plastic notes are replacing paper ones as they are stronger – they will even survive in the washing machine should you accidentally leave some cash in your pocket.

They are also harder to counterfeit, helping the central Bank lock down on fraud. But what should you do if you come across any old ones? We look at what to do with old £20 and £50 paper notes and where to exchange them for new polymer versions. Subscribe to MoneyWeek today and get your first six magazine issues absolutely FREE Don’t miss the latest investment and personal finances news, market analysis, plus money-saving tips with our free twice-daily newsletter Don’t miss the latest investment and personal finances news, market analysis, plus money-saving tips with our free twice-daily newsletter

What bank note was Turner on?

Turner’s self-portrait, as featured on the new £20 note, is currently on display at Tate Britain alongside the banknote.