Asked By: Raymond Hernandez Date: created: Jan 23 2023

Who is the head of Uttlesford

Answered By: Wyatt Simmons Date: created: Jan 24 2023

Chief Executive, Peter Holt’s narrative on the financial situation – Uttlesford District Council Uttlesford District Council’s Chief Executive, Peter Holt, provides some further detail on the financial challenges facing the authority over the next five years.

Senior officers at Uttlesford District Council today briefed councillors and staff on the current anticipated scale of financial challenge facing the authority over the next five years, taking into account the local implications of the national recession and international economic crisis, as well as local circumstances and changes in Government policy that look likely to substantially reduce income, such as from Business Rates.

Despite the world being a very different place at the end of 2022 to the start of the year when the Council set both its one year budget and five year medium term financial plan, today’s professional and technical assessment has shown relatively modest need for additional financial constraints beyond some immediate belt-tightening in routine council expenditure.

Today’s assessment showed how various issues facing the authority have contributed to this latest challenging financial situation, including the increase in utility bills adding a pressure of £271,000 over the next year (on top of potentially over £250,000 to keep leisure centres and swimming pools warm and open), £300,000 in inflationary rises in costs of other goods and services, and £600,000 in the higher-than-budgeted for nationally-set pay rise for council workers (averaging 6% pay rise per employee against near double-digit inflation faced by households).Today’s assessment also included predictions of how the council, like others round the country, will be potentially negatively hit by changes anticipated in central government funding regimes in two or three years’ time, including both the removal of New Homes Bonus funding and possibly locally detrimental changes to the way that Business Rates are charged to companies round the country and then channelled back to local councils by central government, with more money heading elsewhere in the country as part of the government’s ‘levelling-up’ agenda.The assessment also takes into account higher interest rates nationally on council borrowing – whilst revealing that the Council successfully fixed over £80 million of borrowing in the late summer just before two subsequent Bank of England interest rate rises, which has substantially reduced Uttlesford’s exposure to ongoing interest rate risk.Today’s assessment did reflect some other positive elements too – including how the council’s £250 million+ portfolio of commercial assets is predicted to continue to contribute substantial profits to council coffers, as well as having grown in their saleable value by several tens of millions over recent years.

Councillors and staff were briefed on how this overall set of projections taking everything into account is likely to impact on the affordability of council services by the end of the next five years, with 20-25% net reductions in spending anticipated by 2027, matched by a similar drop in the number of staff employed by the authority.

They were told how this equates over five years to a possible reduction in the order of 60-80 jobs, down from the current c320 full-time employee headcount – and with that, a reduction or ending of some council services. Compared to this average requirement to reduce the number of staff employed by 10-20 per year, the Council typically has 30-40 casual job vacancies in a typical year, as staff retire or move to new jobs elsewhere, making such a headcount reduction much more manageable with less additional disruption to other staff or to service users.

The Council remains as a matter of policy firmly committed to minimising and if possible avoiding compulsory redundancies, and has long had systems in place to make this a reality, such as by default only filling most vacant posts with fixed term staff, and only then if the current workload cannot be covered without needing to replace a vacant post.

No specific proposals for service or job reductions over the next five years were discussed, and none have yet been developed. A timetable was shared today for setting a balanced budget for next financial year, as usual, in February, and for work to be done over the winter and spring developing longer term savings options to be brought back to Councillors for decision in the summer of 2023.

Because of its historic record of prudent financial management and supported in large part by the building up of a highly successful commercial asset portfolio over recent years, Uttlesford District Council is well placed – and better placed than many other councils – to weather this tough but manageable challenge, albeit with the prospect over the next five years of a reduction in service levels and staffing to the tune of approximately 20-25%.

  • Presenting their technical assessment, Uttlesford’s Finance Director Adrian Webb and Chief Executive Peter Holt characterised the challenge overall as “tough but manageable”.
  • Today’s technical assessment also trailed a 30 year business plan currently being finalised for the authority’s stock of 2,800 council houses, which will be brought to Councillors for consideration over coming weeks.

The finances of the Council’s housing stock sits aside from the rest of its finances, as required by law, and whilst also exposed to similar pressures around cost inflation and ability of tenants to pay their rent, they are overall much less constrained.

What areas come under Uttlesford?

Uttlesford District Council A quick guide to where Uttlesford is and who we are. Uttlesford is a thriving, predominantly rural district in north-west Essex encompassing Saffron Walden, Great Dunmow, Stansted Mountfitchet and Thaxted and about 100 villages and hamlets in between.

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With both new development and an historic and rural environment existing in harmony, Uttlesford is often cited as offering the best quality of life in the UK. Uttlesford District Council has about 300 staff and delivers a huge range of services for residents and businesses such as bin collections, providing council housing, deciding on planning, collecting Council Tax, restaurant inspections and running Saffron Walden Museum.There are 39 representing 22 wards.The council offices are based in the beautiful market town of Saffron Walden, with its array of independent and unique boutique shops, cafes, restaurants and galleries, surrounded on all sides by fields and picturesque villages full of character.

Which party runs Lancaster City council?

Political makeup of the council Lancaster City Council is currently under no overall control, meaning that no single political group achieves a majority of seats.

Is Trafford Tory or Labour?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Trafford Council
Type
Type Metropolitan district council of the Metropolitan Borough of Trafford
History
Founded 1 April 1974
Leadership
Mayor Dolores O’Sullivan, Labour since 25 May 2023
Leader Tom Ross, Labour since 17 December 2022
Chief executive Sara Todd since 1 February 2019
Structure
Seats 63 councillors
Political groups Administration Labour (41) Opposition Conservative (10) Liberal Democrat (6) Green Party (6)
Joint committees Greater Manchester Combined Authority Greater Manchester Police, Fire and Crime Panel
Length of term 4 years
Elections
Voting system First-past-the-post, third of council elected three years out of four
Last election 2021 (one third of councillors) 2022 (one third of councillors) 2023 (all councillors)
Next election 2024 (one third of councillors) 2026 (one third of councillors) 2027 (one third of councillors)
Meeting place
Trafford Town Hall, Talbot Road, Stretford
Website
trafford,gov,uk

Trafford Council is the local authority of the Metropolitan Borough of Trafford in Greater Manchester, England. a It is a metropolitan district council, one of ten in Greater Manchester and one of 36 in the metropolitan counties of England, and provides the majority of local government services in Trafford.

Who is CEO of Trafford Council?

The new top boss at Trafford Council has begun her first day in her new role. Sara Todd, who was appointed chief executive of Trafford Council in November, takes over from Jim Taylor, who has been working in a dual role alongside his position at Salford Council since June.

Mrs Todd said: It’s great to be here at last and I’m raring to go. The Council has a vision of working together to build the best future for all our communities in Trafford and I’ll be devoting all my energy to making this happen. I want our Council and hard-working staff to ensure the borough continues to be a great place for all our residents, and to make it a place we can all be proud of.” Sara was born in East Manchester and educated in the city going on to gain a BA (Hons) in Town and Country Planning and a Bachelor of Planning at the University of Manchester.

She has worked in four other Greater Manchester councils during her career – at Bolton, Oldham, Tameside and Manchester – in a variety of planning, economic development and regeneration roles over the last 20 years. Her previous role at Manchester Council saw her cover a wide portfolio including responsibility for highways, waste and street cleaning, libraries, community safety, leisure, events together with HR, communications, policy, performance and research functions.

Cllr Andrew Western, leader of Trafford Council, said: I am delighted to welcome Sara and I am very much looking forward to working with her. Trafford is a thriving, diverse, prosperous, and culturally vibrant borough and I have no doubt that Sara will excel in ensuring our bold visions for the future are realised.” Mr Taylor, the outgoing chief executive, said: I have thoroughly enjoyed my time here at Trafford Council.

I’ve had the privilege of working with a superb team and I know how hard-working the staff are. Sara is coming at an exciting time for the Council and the borough, and I wish her every success in her endeavours.” Posted on Tuesday 26th February 2019

Asked By: Nathaniel Peterson Date: created: Jun 17 2023

Which party controls Trafford Council

Answered By: Bruce Flores Date: created: Jun 19 2023

Political control

Party in control Years
No overall control 2003–2004
Conservative 2004–2018
No overall control 2018–2019
Labour 2019–present
Asked By: Wallace Baker Date: created: Jan 27 2024

Why is Uttlesford called Uttlesford

Answered By: Samuel Howard Date: created: Jan 27 2024

History – The district was formed on 1 April 1974 under the Local Government Act 1972 as one of 14 districts within Essex. The new district covered the area of three former districts, which were all abolished at the same time:

  • Dunmow Rural District
  • Saffron Walden Municipal Borough
  • Saffron Walden Rural District

The new district was named after the ancient hundred of Uttlesford, which had covered much of the area. The hundred had been named after a ford on the London Road (now the B1383, formerly the A11 ) at Wendens Ambo, since replaced by a bridge. The ford appears to derive its name from “Udel’s ford”.

Asked By: Geoffrey Gray Date: created: Mar 08 2023

What is R4U

Answered By: Alan Jenkins Date: created: Mar 10 2023

Article Talk. Residents for Uttlesford (R4U) is a localist political party in the United Kingdom.

Asked By: Jonathan Russell Date: created: Jun 05 2023

What county is Uttlesford in

Answered By: Alfred Bailey Date: created: Jun 08 2023

Uttlesford, district, administrative and historic county of Essex, England, It occupies the northwestern corner of the county, where it borders Cambridgeshire and Hertfordshire, A low ridge of chalk hills runs from southwest to northeast through a rolling countryside.

The district is largely rural. The main town is Saffron Walden ; there are also many smaller old parishes, such as Thaxted, Great Dunmow, and Stansted Mountfitchet. The region has long been a residential area for affluent commuters to London, London Stansted Airport has become the capital’s third major field, after Heathrow and Gatwick.

Area 248 square miles (642 square km). Pop. (2001) 68,946; (2011) 79,443. This article was most recently revised and updated by Chelsey Parrott-Sheffer,

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How big is uttlesford?

It is the largest district in Essex covering approximately 250 square miles, and is mainly rural in character with four market towns: Saffron Walden, Great Dunmow, Stansted Mountfitchet and Thaxted, and has 56 parishes. There are 3,751 listed buildings and 34 conservation areas.

What council is Braintree?

Governance –

Braintree District Council
Type
Type Non-metropolitan district
History
Founded 1 April 1974
Leadership
Chair Diana Garrod, Conservative since 25 May 2023
Leader Graham Butland, Conservative since 2004
Chief Executive Dan Gascoyne since September 2022
Structure
Seats 49 councillors
Political groups Administration (26) Conservative (26) Opposition (23) Labour (9) Independent (7) Green (4) Halstead RA (3)
Length of term Whole council elected every four years
Elections
Last election 4 May 2023
Next election 2027
Meeting place
Causeway House, Bocking End, Braintree, CM7 9HB
Website
www,braintree,gov,uk

Braintree District Council provides district-level services. County-level services are provided by Essex County Council, Much of the district is also covered by civil parishes, which form a third tier of local government.

What council is Buckhurst Hill?

Buckhurst Hill is a pleasant residential settlement in the southwest corner of Essex, adjacent to London with half of its land being taken up by Epping Forest and other open spaces. Buckhurst Hill Parish Council is the first of three ‘tiers’- the other two being Epping Forest District Council and Essex County Council.

What is the difference between Lancaster and Lancashire?

Lancaster (/ˈlæŋkæstər/), commonly known as the City of Lancaster, is a non-metropolitan district within Lancashire, England, with the status of a city.

How many seats did conservatives lose 2023?

The Conservatives lost 1,063 seats, while Labour gained 537 and the Liberal Democrats 407.

Is Lancaster its own city?

Lancaster, California
City
Downtown Lancaster
Flag
Motto: Creating a better tomorrow. Together.
Location in Los Angeles County, California
Lancaster Location within the Los Angeles Metropolitan Area Show map of the Los Angeles metropolitan area Show map of California Show map of the United States Show all
Coordinates: 34°41′N 118°9′W  /  34.683°N 118.150°W
Country United States
State California
County Los Angeles
Incorporated November 22, 1977
Named for Sources unclear, either a railroad employee’s name or Lancaster, Pennsylvania
Government
• Type Council-manager
• Mayor R. Rex Parris
• Vice Mayor Marvin Crist
• City Council Ken Mann Raj Malhi Darrell Dorris
• City Manager Jason Caudle
• Assistant City Manager Trolis Niebla
Area
• Total 94.54 sq mi (244.87 km 2 )
• Land 94.28 sq mi (244.19 km 2 )
• Water 0.26 sq mi (0.68 km 2 ) 0.29%
Elevation 2,359 ft (719 m)
Population ( 2020 )
• Total 173,516
• Density 1,835/sq mi (645.41/km 2 )
Time zone UTC−8 ( Pacific )
• Summer ( DST ) UTC−7 ( PDT )
ZIP Codes 93534–93536, 93539, 93584
Area code 661
FIPS code 06-40130
GNIS feature IDs 1652741, 2411620
Website www,cityoflancasterca,org

Lancaster is a charter city in northern Los Angeles County, in the Antelope Valley of the western Mojave Desert in Southern California, As of the 2020 census, the population was 173,516, making Lancaster the 153rd largest city in the United States and the 30th largest in California,

  1. Lancaster is a twin city with its southern neighbor Palmdale ; together, they are the principal cities within the Antelope Valley region.
  2. Lancaster is located approximately 70 miles (110 km) north (via I-5 and SR 14 ) of downtown Los Angeles and is near the Kern County line.
  3. It is separated from the Los Angeles Basin by the San Gabriel Mountains to the south and from Bakersfield and the San Joaquin Valley by the Tehachapi Mountains to the north.

The population of Lancaster has grown from 37,000 at the time of its incorporation in 1977 to over 157,000 as of 2019.

Who is the head of Uttlesford?

Chief Executive, Peter Holt’s narrative on the financial situation – Uttlesford District Council Uttlesford District Council’s Chief Executive, Peter Holt, provides some further detail on the financial challenges facing the authority over the next five years.

Senior officers at Uttlesford District Council today briefed councillors and staff on the current anticipated scale of financial challenge facing the authority over the next five years, taking into account the local implications of the national recession and international economic crisis, as well as local circumstances and changes in Government policy that look likely to substantially reduce income, such as from Business Rates.

Despite the world being a very different place at the end of 2022 to the start of the year when the Council set both its one year budget and five year medium term financial plan, today’s professional and technical assessment has shown relatively modest need for additional financial constraints beyond some immediate belt-tightening in routine council expenditure.

Today’s assessment showed how various issues facing the authority have contributed to this latest challenging financial situation, including the increase in utility bills adding a pressure of £271,000 over the next year (on top of potentially over £250,000 to keep leisure centres and swimming pools warm and open), £300,000 in inflationary rises in costs of other goods and services, and £600,000 in the higher-than-budgeted for nationally-set pay rise for council workers (averaging 6% pay rise per employee against near double-digit inflation faced by households).Today’s assessment also included predictions of how the council, like others round the country, will be potentially negatively hit by changes anticipated in central government funding regimes in two or three years’ time, including both the removal of New Homes Bonus funding and possibly locally detrimental changes to the way that Business Rates are charged to companies round the country and then channelled back to local councils by central government, with more money heading elsewhere in the country as part of the government’s ‘levelling-up’ agenda.The assessment also takes into account higher interest rates nationally on council borrowing – whilst revealing that the Council successfully fixed over £80 million of borrowing in the late summer just before two subsequent Bank of England interest rate rises, which has substantially reduced Uttlesford’s exposure to ongoing interest rate risk.Today’s assessment did reflect some other positive elements too – including how the council’s £250 million+ portfolio of commercial assets is predicted to continue to contribute substantial profits to council coffers, as well as having grown in their saleable value by several tens of millions over recent years.

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Councillors and staff were briefed on how this overall set of projections taking everything into account is likely to impact on the affordability of council services by the end of the next five years, with 20-25% net reductions in spending anticipated by 2027, matched by a similar drop in the number of staff employed by the authority.

They were told how this equates over five years to a possible reduction in the order of 60-80 jobs, down from the current c320 full-time employee headcount – and with that, a reduction or ending of some council services. Compared to this average requirement to reduce the number of staff employed by 10-20 per year, the Council typically has 30-40 casual job vacancies in a typical year, as staff retire or move to new jobs elsewhere, making such a headcount reduction much more manageable with less additional disruption to other staff or to service users.

The Council remains as a matter of policy firmly committed to minimising and if possible avoiding compulsory redundancies, and has long had systems in place to make this a reality, such as by default only filling most vacant posts with fixed term staff, and only then if the current workload cannot be covered without needing to replace a vacant post.

  • No specific proposals for service or job reductions over the next five years were discussed, and none have yet been developed.
  • A timetable was shared today for setting a balanced budget for next financial year, as usual, in February, and for work to be done over the winter and spring developing longer term savings options to be brought back to Councillors for decision in the summer of 2023.

Because of its historic record of prudent financial management and supported in large part by the building up of a highly successful commercial asset portfolio over recent years, Uttlesford District Council is well placed – and better placed than many other councils – to weather this tough but manageable challenge, albeit with the prospect over the next five years of a reduction in service levels and staffing to the tune of approximately 20-25%.

  1. Presenting their technical assessment, Uttlesford’s Finance Director Adrian Webb and Chief Executive Peter Holt characterised the challenge overall as “tough but manageable”.
  2. Today’s technical assessment also trailed a 30 year business plan currently being finalised for the authority’s stock of 2,800 council houses, which will be brought to Councillors for consideration over coming weeks.

The finances of the Council’s housing stock sits aside from the rest of its finances, as required by law, and whilst also exposed to similar pressures around cost inflation and ability of tenants to pay their rent, they are overall much less constrained.

Which party won Bradford council?

References –

Local Government in England and Wales: A Guide to the New System, London:,1974.p.7.,, GOV.UK,26 March 2021, Retrieved 22 January 2022,, bradford.moderngov.co.uk,5 May 2022, Retrieved 10 April 2023,, bradford.moderngov.co.uk,2 May 2019, Retrieved 10 April 2023,, BBC News,5 May 2023, Retrieved 19 May 2023, Sandeman, Kit (5 May 2023)., Yorkshire Post, Retrieved 19 May 2023,, GOV.UK, Retrieved 27 April 2018, (PDF),, www.bradford.gov.uk, Retrieved 10 April 2023,

Retrieved from “” : 2023 City of Bradford Metropolitan District Council election

Which party won in Barnet council?

2022 Barnet London Borough Council election 2022 local election in Barnet 2022 Barnet London Borough Council election

5 May 2022 2026 →

All 63 council seats

First party Second party
Leader Barry Rawlings Daniel Thomas
Party
Leader’s seat Friern Barnet Finchley Church End
Last election 25 seats, 39.0% 38 seats, 44.5%
Seats won 41 22
Seat change 16 16
Popular vote 46,070 37,608
Percentage 43.0% 35.1%
Swing 4.0% 9.4%

Map of the results of the 2022 Barnet London Borough council election. in red and in blue.

Council control before election Subsequent council control

The 2022 Barnet London Borough Council election took place on 5 May 2022, alongside and, All 63 members of were elected. The took overall control, winning 41 of the seats to the ‘s 22. This was the first time Labour had won the council outright; previously, the Conservatives had always won the most seats, usually with an overall majority.

Who is the leader of the South Staffordshire District council?

After the devastating fire and demolition at the former site of the Crooked House, South Staffordshire Council leader Cllr Roger Lees issued the following statement: “Our officers carried out a site visit to the site yesterday (August 7th), prior to the demolition of the building.

“Officers agreed a programme of works with the landowner’s representative to ensure the safety of the building and the wider site. “The agreed course of action included the removal of three elements of the first-floor front elevation only. This was only to avoid the weak parts of the structure from falling.

“At no point did the council agree the demolition of the whole structure nor was this deemed necessary. “This council finds the manner in which the situation was managed following the fire completely unacceptable and contrary to instructions provided by our officers.

  • As such, we are currently investigating potential breaches of both the Town and Country Planning Act and the Buildings Act.
  • Demolition of a building should be carried out in accordance with Schedule 2 Part 11 Class B of The Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (England) Order 2015.

The steps required by the legislation were not carried out in this case. “We have referred these matters to our legal team with a view to taking enforcement action. “As soon as we were made aware of the breaches during the demolition, we notified the Health and Safety Executive.

We are also liaising with many other relevant statutory bodies, including Historic England, the police and fire services, amongst others. These bodies will take the lead on investigating the issues surrounding the fire, safety of the unauthorised demolition and securing the ongoing safety of the site.

“Our own investigation is in its early stages and whilst it continues at pace, we as ask for time to consider the facts thoroughly to ensure any future actions are meaningful and proportionate. “The council is incredibly saddened by the loss of the building which, whilst not listed, was a heritage asset and important landmark to the local area and community.