Asked By: Oscar Scott Date: created: Aug 28 2023

Is Queen Elizabeth The Longest-reigning monarch in the world

Answered By: Andrew Williams Date: created: Aug 30 2023

Who are the longest-reigning monarchs? We take a look at the world’s longest-reigning kings and queens throughout history, including the late Queen Elizabeth II. On top is Louis XIV from France, who reigned from 14th May 1643 until 1st September 1715 — a total of 72 years and 110 days. Bettmann // Getty Images

Asked By: Neil Diaz Date: created: Feb 03 2023

Which country has the longest monarchy

Answered By: Justin Lewis Date: created: Feb 04 2023

1. Imperial House of Japan – Year Founded : 660 BCE (according to legend, but cited as the official founding date) First Monarch: Emperor Jimmu Current Monarch: Emperor Akihito Current Heir Apparent: Crown Prince Naruhito photo source: Wikipedia According to legend, the Imperial House of Japan was founded in 660 BCE by Japan’s first Emperor, Jimmu, making it the oldest continuous hereditary monarchy in the world. Although Japan’s monarchy has mythological origins, the country recognizes February 11, 660 BCE as the official date of its founding.

Who are the top 3 longest reigning monarch?

Monarchs of sovereign states with verifiable reigns by exact date

No. Name Reign
From
1 Louis XIV 14 May 1643
2 Elizabeth II 6 February 1952
3 Rama IX (Bhumibol Adulyadej) 9 June 1946
Asked By: Julian Clark Date: created: Nov 27 2023

Who is the second longest monarch

Answered By: Michael Mitchell Date: created: Nov 27 2023

Queen Elizabeth II, the UK ‘s longest reigning monarch, has died aged 96. After 70 years on the throne, she has worked alongside 14 U.S. presidents and 15 UK prime ministers, the last of whom, Liz Truss, was appointed to the role just two days before the queen died.

With seven decades in power, Elizabeth is the second longest ruling monarch of a state that was internationally recognized as sovereign. Only one other ruled for longer, King Louis XIV of France, who headed the country for more than 72 years, between 1643-1715. Louis was just four years old when he was named king.

As our chart shows, Thailand’s King Bhumibol Adulyadej (Rama IX) comes in a close third place, having ended his rule in 2016 after 70 years and 126 days. In terms of the longest reigning monarchs of all time, including states that were not internationally recognised as sovereign for most of their reign, Elizabeth would rank much further down the list. Description This chart shows the longest reigning monarchs of sovereign states as of 2022. Report URL to be used as reference link :

Asked By: Neil Green Date: created: May 09 2024

What is the oldest monarchy in Europe

Answered By: Anthony Johnson Date: created: May 12 2024

Sweden – Sweden ‘s monarchy goes back almost as far as the Danish one, to the semilegendary kings before the 10th century, since then it has not been interrupted. However, the unification of the rivalling kingdoms Svealand and Götaland (consolidation of Sweden) did not occur until some time later, possibly in the early 11th century.

Asked By: Louis White Date: created: Nov 05 2023

Who has the shortest reign in British history

Answered By: Jaden Evans Date: created: Nov 07 2023

Shortest – The shortest-reigning monarch was Lady Jane Grey who ruled for 9 days from 6 July until 15 July 1553 (although she was only proclaimed queen by the Lords of the council on 10 July). Her husband Lord Guildford Dudley was her consort for the entire reign, making this the shortest tenure of the male consort of a female monarch.

Note: Jane’s reign is disputed, The king with the shortest definitively known reign was Edgar the Ætheling who ruled for 2 months, 12 days in 1066 before submitting to William the Conqueror, Some records indicate that Sweyn Forkbeard reigned for only 40 days in 1013–4. The queen consort with the shortest tenure was Yolande de Dreux, second wife of Alexander III, who was queen for 154 days in 1285 and 1286.

The shortest tenure as heir apparent was that of the unnamed son of Henry VIII who died within hours of birth on 7 September 1513. Elizabeth I holds the records for the shortest tenure of an English heir presumptive (almost 2 years as heir-presumptive to Henry VIII ) unless one recognizes the 13-day tenure attributed to Lady Jane Grey ‘s sister, The Lady Herbert of Cardiff,

Who is the longest lasting queen?

Ruling from 1952 until her death on Sept.8, 2022, Queen Elizabeth II was the longest-reigning monarch in British history, surpassing the reign of her great-great-grandmother, Queen Victoria, who spent 63 years on the throne between 1837 and 1901. At her death, Victoria was not only Queen of Great Britain but also held the title “Empress of India” — despite never stepping foot on the Indian subcontinent. Brooke Newman, Ph.D., associate professor in the VCU Department of History. (Contributed photo) Newman is a historian of early modern Britain and the British Atlantic, with current special interest in the history of slavery, the abolition movement and the British royal family.

Her upcoming book, “The Queen’s Silence: The Hidden History of the British Monarchy and Slavery,” is the first to chronicle the evolving policies and attitudes of the British Crown and prominent members of the royal family toward African slave trading, enslavement and racial exploitation, from the reign of Elizabeth I to the reign of Queen Victoria.

It blends groundbreaking archival research with narrative synthesis to offer the first full account of the British monarchy and slavery covering over 450 years. Aimed at general readers, the book will be released in late 2024 or early 2025. Newman spoke with VCU News about the past and future of the British monarchy.

  1. The world has changed so much over the past 70 years.
  2. How has the monarchy changed during this time? How did Queen Elizabeth herself change during her reign? Elizabeth acceded to the throne during the postwar era and as Britain’s once-extensive overseas empire was shrinking in the wake of hard-fought independence movements.
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Her coronation in 1953, which was steeped in imperial symbolism, was the first to be televised, and it was a grand event watched by viewers around the world. Held at arms-length during the reign of her father, George VI (1936-1952), the media became increasingly more invasive and less deferential to the royal family in the decades after Elizabeth took the throne.

On the one hand, Queen Elizabeth and the 1,000-year-old institution she embodied offered continuity and reassurance in a rapidly changing world. Through seven decades of social and political upheaval, the queen remained a steadfast, seemingly timeless figure; a national symbol of duty, longevity and resilience.

On the other hand, the monarchy, with its lavish, archaic customs and millennium’s worth of inherited wealth and privilege, often appeared outmoded and even wasteful, particularly during periods of economic crisis and austerity. To ensure the institution’s survival, Queen Elizabeth was forced to adapt and, at times, to bend to public pressure. Queen Elizabeth II on the Royal Tour of New Zealand of 1953/54. (Communicate New Zealand – National Archives – CNZ Collection) What will she most be remembered for? Tight-lipped and inscrutable throughout her reign, Queen Elizabeth stood apart from the rest of the royal family, commanding a level of respect and reverence that her successor, Prince Charles, is unlikely to attain, either at home or abroad.

She will be remembered as a stoic and dignified fixture of British life and a symbol of national unity. Still, despite her iconic status, the queen was not universally beloved. Head of an ancient institution whose privileges are hereditary, she never acknowledged or apologized for her ancestors’ role in the brutal oppression and enslavement of colonized peoples across the globe.

Nor did she speak out against the violent acts done in her name during her lifetime — the brutal suppression of the Mau Mau uprising in Kenya, for instance. How will Charles’ reign be different? At age 73, Charles III is the oldest monarch to ascend the throne; he’s spent his entire life waiting in the wings.

Compared to his mother, Charles’s reign will be necessarily short-lived and less impactful. Charles has also become king at a moment when support for the monarchy is waning, particularly among young Britons, and as more Commonwealth Realms consider cutting ties with the monarchy following the queen’s death.

With the U.K. facing unprecedented crises — spiraling post-Brexit inflation, the ongoing disruptions of the Covid-19 pandemic and war in Ukraine, climate change and mounting inequality — whether Britain’s new king can provide the same symbolic power and steadying influence as his mother is doubtful.

  1. What can we expect from King Charles? Charles will need to tread carefully to appear politically neutral and not overstep the bounds of his position as a constitutional monarch — a skill his mother perfected over her seven decades on the throne.
  2. Yet, as the longest-serving heir apparent in British history, Charles has already spent a lifetime in the public eye; he’s acquired a reputation as one of the most outspoken and controversial members of the royal family.

As Prince of Wales, he repeatedly attempted to influence government policy, became embroiled in controversies over donations to his charities, and lost public esteem as a result of the messy public breakdown of his marriage to Princess Diana, recently rehashed for global audiences on Netflix’s “The Crown.” As scrutiny of King Charles intensifies, I expect we will see him adopt a new tone and take a step back from the causes he has long championed, such as fighting climate change.

You recently wrote an op-ed column about the monarchy’s role in the international slave trade. Was slavery itself practiced as much in Britain as it was in the U.S.? Though there were small numbers of enslaved Africans in Britain as early as the 16th century, Africans and people of African descent were primarily enslaved in Britain’s Atlantic empire.

Between 1525 and 1866, approximately 12.5 million Africans were transported across the Atlantic and sold into slavery in the Caribbean, South America and North America. British ships alone carried an estimated 3.4 million African captives to the Americas between 1640 and 1807; of this number, roughly 2.9 million survived the Middle Passage and disembarked in New World destinations — overwhelmingly in the Caribbean colonies.

  1. During this era, millions of Africans lost their freedom, kinship networks, bodily autonomy and lives to meet Europeans’ insatiable demand for slave-produced sugar and other New World agricultural products.
  2. The title of that column is ‘The Royal Family should apologise for their links to slavery before they are embarrassed into doing so.’ Given all the embarrassing scandals the family has weathered, do you think this will happen? Certainly not any time soon.

As heir apparent, Prince Charles admitted that slavery had tarnished Britain’s relations with its former colonies, but he did not apologize or attempt to make amends for that shameful history on behalf of the Crown or the British people. Now that he is king, Charles III and the rest of “The Firm” will be intensely focused on managing the transition following the queen’s death and keeping the institution of the monarchy intact.

Asked By: Douglas Morris Date: created: Jul 31 2023

Who was king for 15 minutes

Answered By: Dylan Price Date: created: Jul 31 2023

Shortest reign of a monarch Who King Louis XIX (Louis-Antoine of France) In July 1830, Louis-Antoine of France – the last “Dauphin”, or heir apparent – ascended the French throne as King Louis XIX, succeeding his father, Charles X, who had abdicated.

  • Within 20 minutes, however, Louis-Antoine had also abdicated, making him the joint shortest reigning monarch in history.
  • He shares the record with the unfortunate Crown Prince Luís Filipe of Portugal, who technically became King of Portugal for the same brief period following the assassination of his father, Dom Carlos I, on 1 February 1908.

Luís Filipe was himself fatally wounded in the attack, but he survived his father by 20 minutes. Records change on a daily basis and are not immediately published online. For a full list of record titles, please use our Record Application Search. (You will need to register / login for access) Comments below may relate to previous holders of this record.

Who was the king that only lasted 20 minutes?

The Duke of Angouleme was the nephew of the last pre-Revolution French King, Louis XVI (1754-1793). During the Revolution he joined the Royalist army and lead the Vendee rising in 1795; throughout the Napoleonic Wars he fought on the allied side, living in England from 1807 to 1814 and serving under the Duke of Wellington.

  1. The Restoration of 1815 brought his uncle Louis XVIII (1755-1824) to the throne, followed by his father, Charles X (1757-1836).
  2. At the revolution of 1830 his father abdicated and he succeeded him, as Louis XIX, for a twenty-minute reign, after which he decided that it would be prudent to abdicate as well.
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His final years were spent in exile in Austria. George IV commissioned this portrait, with that of the sitter’s father, Charles X (RCIN 405138), in 1825 at a cost of 500 guineas each. Lawrence executed both in Paris in August to November 1625. Angouleme is shown standing in a landscape against a sky full of the storms of war, wearing military uniform, with a cloak over his shoulder and clasping a sword.

George IV took possession of this portrait in 1829; at which time it was hung in St James’s Palace. By the 1840s it was hanging, as it does today, in the ‘Waterloo Chamber’, though whether or not originally intended for that location is uncertain. The Waterloo Chamber is a great hall on the public route at Windsor Castle displaying portraits of those soldiers, sovereigns and diplomats responsible for the overthrow of Napoleon and the re-establishment of the monarchies and states of Europe thereafter.

The concept began in 1814 when George IV used the opportunity of the Treaty of London to commission Lawrence to paint distinguished visitors. The group of portraits grew during the next decade as Lawrence continued to obtain portrait sittings at the various congresses following the Battle of Waterloo in 1815 and, in some cases, by making special journeys.

Asked By: Landon Scott Date: created: Jan 16 2024

Why did Lady Jane GREY only rule for 9 days

Answered By: Albert Coleman Date: created: Jan 16 2024

Did you know? – Lady Jane Grey was buried beneath the altar of the Tower’s Chapel Royal of St Peter ad Vincula.

Which country abolish monarchy?

South Asia – The independence of India from the United Kingdom in 1947 posed a unique problem. From 1858, when the British government replaced Company rule with direct Crown rule, it had been governed as a quasi-federation, with much of the country under the direct rule of the British monarch, who was styled as the Emperor of India,

  1. The remainder of the country, however, was under a form of indirect rule under him through its division into over 500 subnational monarchies, known as princely states ; each was ruled by a prince who acknowledged the suzerainty of the Indian Emperor.
  2. The princely states ranged from powerful and largely independent principalities such as Hyderabad or Mysore, with a high level of autonomy, to tiny fiefdoms a few dozen acres (in the low tens of hectares) in size.

In 1947, it was agreed that India would be partitioned into the independent British dominions of India and Pakistan, with the princely states acceding to one nation or the other. The accession process proceeded smoothly, with the notable exception of four of the most influential principalities.

  1. The Muslim ruler of the Hindu-majority state of Junagadh acceded to Pakistan, but his decision was overruled by the Indian government, while Hyderabad chose to be independent, but was forcibly annexed to India in 1948.
  2. The Hindu ruler of Jammu and Kashmir, among the largest and most powerful of the principalities, but with a Muslim-majority population, initially held off on a decision.

In the autumn of 1947, an invading force from Pakistan frightened the ruler into acceding to India. The ruler of Kalat, in Baluchistan, declared his independence in 1947, after which the state was forcibly merged with Pakistan, resulting in an insurgency persisting to this day.

  1. With the promulgation of the Indian constitution in 1950, India abolished its monarchy under the British crown and became a Republic within the Commonwealth of Nations, followed by Pakistan in 1956; as a result of both developments, the majority of the princes formally lost their sovereign rights.
  2. A few remaining principalities in Pakistan retained their autonomy until 1969 when they finally acceded to Pakistan.

The Indian government formally derecognized its princely families in 1971, followed by Pakistan in 1972.

What is the oldest dynasty in the world?

What is the oldest dynasty? – The oldest dynasty in the world is the House of Yamato, also known as the Imperial House of Japan. According to tradition, the dynasty began in 660BCE with Emperor Jimmu, although existing records only date as far back as the early 4th century with Emperor Ōjin.

Is France no longer a monarchy?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Proclamation of the abolition of the monarchy, high-relief bronze by Léopold Morice, Monument of the Republic, Place de la République, Paris, 1883 During the French Revolution, the proclamation of the abolition of the monarchy (French: Proclamation de l’abolition de la royauté ) was a proclamation by the National Convention of France announcing that it had abolished the French monarchy on 21 September 1792, giving birth to the French First Republic,

Who ruled the longest in England?

Between 1952 and 2022, Elizabeth II was the Queen of the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth, making her the longest serving British monarch in history. She was succeeded by her son Charles III following her death on September 8, 2022.

Asked By: Brian Butler Date: created: Mar 17 2024

How long did Queen Victoria rule

Answered By: Ryan Hughes Date: created: Mar 20 2024

Did you know? – Victoria reigned for 63 years, seven months and two days, a reign only surpassed by her great-great-granddaughter Elizabeth II on 9 September 2015.

Asked By: Richard Hughes Date: created: Jul 04 2023

How many queens ruled England

Answered By: Brandon Ramirez Date: created: Jul 06 2023

Britain has had a number of monarchs through the centuries, though notably far more kings than queens have truly ruled. In fact, there have only been eight reigning queens of England, including Queen Elizabeth II, who died in September 2022. A number of queens ascended to the role through their husbands, who were legitimate heirs to the throne.

Of the women who became queens in their own right, only one — Queen Mary II — insisted on reigning alongside her husband as an equal. The seven other queens each ruled in their own way, whether for a handful of days, like Lady Jane Grey, or for several decades, such as Queen Elizabeth, Following Queen Elizabeth’s death in September 2022, her eldest son, King Charles, succeeded the throne.

As a result, Charles’ wife Camilla became Queen Consort, and the two will be coronated on May 6, 2023. (Queen Consort is the traditional title for the wife of a reigning monarch as Queen is reserved solely for female monarchs who assumed the position through the line of succession.) From Empress Matilda’s chaotic reign in the 12th century to Queen Elizabeth ‘s steady 70-year rule, here is a look at the eight former queens of England.

Asked By: Lewis Cox Date: created: Nov 11 2023

What if Prince Charles dies before the Queen

Answered By: Martin Scott Date: created: Nov 14 2023

Will Camilla be queen if King Charles dies? – If Charles, 74, dies before Camilla, she will have the name of “queen dowager” bestowed upon her, according to reports, As Camilla is excluded from the Windsor bloodline, she would not be the sole queen in the event that Charles passes away before she does.

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Who was the longest reigning monarch before the Queen?

Ruling from 1952 until her death on Sept.8, 2022, Queen Elizabeth II was the longest-reigning monarch in British history, surpassing the reign of her great-great-grandmother, Queen Victoria, who spent 63 years on the throne between 1837 and 1901. At her death, Victoria was not only Queen of Great Britain but also held the title “Empress of India” — despite never stepping foot on the Indian subcontinent. Brooke Newman, Ph.D., associate professor in the VCU Department of History. (Contributed photo) Newman is a historian of early modern Britain and the British Atlantic, with current special interest in the history of slavery, the abolition movement and the British royal family.

Her upcoming book, “The Queen’s Silence: The Hidden History of the British Monarchy and Slavery,” is the first to chronicle the evolving policies and attitudes of the British Crown and prominent members of the royal family toward African slave trading, enslavement and racial exploitation, from the reign of Elizabeth I to the reign of Queen Victoria.

It blends groundbreaking archival research with narrative synthesis to offer the first full account of the British monarchy and slavery covering over 450 years. Aimed at general readers, the book will be released in late 2024 or early 2025. Newman spoke with VCU News about the past and future of the British monarchy.

The world has changed so much over the past 70 years. How has the monarchy changed during this time? How did Queen Elizabeth herself change during her reign? Elizabeth acceded to the throne during the postwar era and as Britain’s once-extensive overseas empire was shrinking in the wake of hard-fought independence movements.

Her coronation in 1953, which was steeped in imperial symbolism, was the first to be televised, and it was a grand event watched by viewers around the world. Held at arms-length during the reign of her father, George VI (1936-1952), the media became increasingly more invasive and less deferential to the royal family in the decades after Elizabeth took the throne.

On the one hand, Queen Elizabeth and the 1,000-year-old institution she embodied offered continuity and reassurance in a rapidly changing world. Through seven decades of social and political upheaval, the queen remained a steadfast, seemingly timeless figure; a national symbol of duty, longevity and resilience.

On the other hand, the monarchy, with its lavish, archaic customs and millennium’s worth of inherited wealth and privilege, often appeared outmoded and even wasteful, particularly during periods of economic crisis and austerity. To ensure the institution’s survival, Queen Elizabeth was forced to adapt and, at times, to bend to public pressure. Queen Elizabeth II on the Royal Tour of New Zealand of 1953/54. (Communicate New Zealand – National Archives – CNZ Collection) What will she most be remembered for? Tight-lipped and inscrutable throughout her reign, Queen Elizabeth stood apart from the rest of the royal family, commanding a level of respect and reverence that her successor, Prince Charles, is unlikely to attain, either at home or abroad.

She will be remembered as a stoic and dignified fixture of British life and a symbol of national unity. Still, despite her iconic status, the queen was not universally beloved. Head of an ancient institution whose privileges are hereditary, she never acknowledged or apologized for her ancestors’ role in the brutal oppression and enslavement of colonized peoples across the globe.

Nor did she speak out against the violent acts done in her name during her lifetime — the brutal suppression of the Mau Mau uprising in Kenya, for instance. How will Charles’ reign be different? At age 73, Charles III is the oldest monarch to ascend the throne; he’s spent his entire life waiting in the wings.

Compared to his mother, Charles’s reign will be necessarily short-lived and less impactful. Charles has also become king at a moment when support for the monarchy is waning, particularly among young Britons, and as more Commonwealth Realms consider cutting ties with the monarchy following the queen’s death.

With the U.K. facing unprecedented crises — spiraling post-Brexit inflation, the ongoing disruptions of the Covid-19 pandemic and war in Ukraine, climate change and mounting inequality — whether Britain’s new king can provide the same symbolic power and steadying influence as his mother is doubtful.

What can we expect from King Charles? Charles will need to tread carefully to appear politically neutral and not overstep the bounds of his position as a constitutional monarch — a skill his mother perfected over her seven decades on the throne. Yet, as the longest-serving heir apparent in British history, Charles has already spent a lifetime in the public eye; he’s acquired a reputation as one of the most outspoken and controversial members of the royal family.

As Prince of Wales, he repeatedly attempted to influence government policy, became embroiled in controversies over donations to his charities, and lost public esteem as a result of the messy public breakdown of his marriage to Princess Diana, recently rehashed for global audiences on Netflix’s “The Crown.” As scrutiny of King Charles intensifies, I expect we will see him adopt a new tone and take a step back from the causes he has long championed, such as fighting climate change.

  1. You recently wrote an op-ed column about the monarchy’s role in the international slave trade.
  2. Was slavery itself practiced as much in Britain as it was in the U.S.? Though there were small numbers of enslaved Africans in Britain as early as the 16th century, Africans and people of African descent were primarily enslaved in Britain’s Atlantic empire.

Between 1525 and 1866, approximately 12.5 million Africans were transported across the Atlantic and sold into slavery in the Caribbean, South America and North America. British ships alone carried an estimated 3.4 million African captives to the Americas between 1640 and 1807; of this number, roughly 2.9 million survived the Middle Passage and disembarked in New World destinations — overwhelmingly in the Caribbean colonies.

  • During this era, millions of Africans lost their freedom, kinship networks, bodily autonomy and lives to meet Europeans’ insatiable demand for slave-produced sugar and other New World agricultural products.
  • The title of that column is ‘The Royal Family should apologise for their links to slavery before they are embarrassed into doing so.’ Given all the embarrassing scandals the family has weathered, do you think this will happen? Certainly not any time soon.

As heir apparent, Prince Charles admitted that slavery had tarnished Britain’s relations with its former colonies, but he did not apologize or attempt to make amends for that shameful history on behalf of the Crown or the British people. Now that he is king, Charles III and the rest of “The Firm” will be intensely focused on managing the transition following the queen’s death and keeping the institution of the monarchy intact.