Asked By: Cody Bryant Date: created: May 16 2024

Who owns the Times and The Sun newspapers

Answered By: Ian Lee Date: created: May 19 2024

Thetimes.co.uk hosts the digital edition of The Times, Britain’s oldest national daily newspaper, and its sister title The Sunday Times, The Times was founded in 1785 by the editor and publisher John Walter I, “to record the principal occurrences of the times” for the service of the public.

It was called the Daily Universal Register for the first three years, until it rebranded as The Times in 1788 – the first newspaper in the world to use the Times name. In his first edition, John Walter I explained that “like a well-covered table, it should contain something suited to every palate” including politics, foreign affairs, matters of trade, legal trials, advertisements and “amusements”.

In its tone and political neutrality, Walter reserved the right of the newspaper “to censure or applaud either ” and to cover contending issues with respectful “fair argument”. More than 200 years on, these founding principles hold true today. The Times has supported both New Labour and the Conservatives in recent times and supported Remain in the 2016 EU referendum.

The Sunday Times was founded in 1822 as a separate newspaper and has a history of innovation stretching from a female proprietor in 1887 and a female editor in 1894, through to pioneering the publication of large illustrations, book serialisations, separate sections and the first colour magazine supplement in 1962.

The Sunday Times supported Leave in the 2016 EU referendum. The Times and The Sunday Times were first held under common ownership by Lord Thomson in 1966 as Times Media Limited and were bought by Rupert Murdoch in 1981. TNL is now part of News UK, Both papers introduced digital subscriptions in 2010 to help ensure a sustainable future for their journalism.

  1. The titles are currently the biggest selling quality print newspapers in the UK and in 2018 The Times was named Britain’s most trusted national newspaper by the Reuters Institute for Journalism at Oxford University.
  2. Both The Times and The Sunday Times have landed some of the industry’s top awards for investigations, foreign reporting, magazine features and interviews.

At the 2022 Press Club Awards The Sunday Times won Sunday newspaper of the year. EDITORIAL STANDARDS The Times and The Sunday Times take complaints about editorial content seriously. We are committed to abiding by the Independent Press Standards Organisation (“Ipso”) regulations and the Editors’ Code of Practice that Ipso enforces.

Requests for corrections or clarifications in The Times should be sent by email to [email protected], To complain about a Sunday Times story, please fill out this form. Corrections, clarifications and adjudications are published regularly where warranted. You can also contact Ipso for advice. OWNERSHIP The Times & The Sunday Times are published by Times Media Limited, part of News UK & Ireland Ltd.

Further information on News UK & Ireland Ltd can be found here. News UK & Ireland is part of News Corp, a global diversified media business focused on creating and distributing content that educates, informs and inspires our customers. Further information on News Corp, including ownership information, can be found here.

Who is the owner of the Sun Nigeria?

About. Neya Kalu is an astute Business Executive, Lawyer, Entrepreneur, and Philanthropist. She is currently the Chairman of The Sun Nigeria, a reputable Nigerian News Organization, Vice Chairman of Sun Heavens Hotels and Resorts, and the Founder/CEO of Basecoat a chain of Nail Salons in Nigeria.

Who owns the Sun paper in UK?

Hero or villain? Rupert Murdoch’s exit stirs strong feelings in Britain, where he upended the media LONDON – Before he hit America, Rupert Murdoch ripped through Britain’s media like a tornado. His newspapers changed the political and cultural weather and swung s.

His satellite television channels upended the staid broadcasting scene. Journalists and politicians in the U.K. both hailed and reviled the 92-year-old mogul after he announced Thursday that he was stepping down as leader of his companies Fox and News Corp., handing control to his son Lachlan. For The Times of London, which he owns, Murdoch was “a trailblazer who changed the media.” Former Prime Minister Boris Johnson said the tycoon “did more than any press baron in the last 100 years to promote the cause of the global free media that is indispensable for democracy and progress.” But to his critics, Murdoch was an unaccountable, malevolent presence in British life.

Nathan Sparkes of Hacked Off, a press reform group that aims to curb tabloid wrongdoing, said Murdoch “presided over a company where widespread illegality occurred and was subsequently covered up.” Ex-Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn argued that Murdoch’s outlets had “poisoned global democracy and spread disinformation on a mass scale.” U.K.

Treasury chief Jeremy Hunt told LBC radio: “He is someone who, love him or loathe him, had a defining influence on all of our lives over the last half-century.” The Australian upstart was all but unknown in Britain when he bought flagging Sunday newspaper the News of the World in 1969, acquiring daily paper The Sun soon after.

A hands-on owner, he reinvigorated Britain’s stodgy, class-ridden newspaper scene with papers that embraced sports, celebrity, prize giveaways and sex — most infamously with The Sun’s topless “Page 3 girls.” In a 1989 BBC interview, Murdoch put his success down to his antipodean roots, saying Australians came to the U.K.

  1. With “greater determination and greater energy,” unfettered by respect for “the rules of the ‘old world.'” “We did things that people said couldn’t be done,” he said.
  2. Populist, pomposity-puncturing and patriotic, Murdoch’s tabloids undeniably had flair.
  3. Critics deplored headlines like “Up yours, Delors,” directed at then-European Commission President Jacques Delors, and “Gotcha!” — the Sun’s reaction when a British submarine sank the Argentine cruiser Belgrano, killing more than 300 sailors, during the 1982 Falklands War.

The Sun’s coverage of the 1989 Hillsborough stadium disaster, in which 96 Liverpool soccer fans were killed, sparked outrage by making false allegations against the victims. More than three decades later, many Liverpudlians still refuse to read The Sun.

But politicians from both right and left courted and feared Murdoch, who added The Times and Sunday Times to his stable in 1981. An arch-conservative who also hates the establishment, he was an enthusiastic supporter through the 1980s of Conservative leader Margaret Thatcher, who shared Murdoch’s enmity toward powerful trade unions.

After Thatcher’s Conservative successor John Major unexpectedly triumphed in the 1992 election, the tabloid boasted: “It’s the Sun wot won it.” Tony Blair’s success in securing Murdoch’s backing helped Blair’s Labour Party win a landslide victory in 1997.

  1. Like other politicians, Blair denied giving Murdoch anything in return for his support — though plenty of skeptics doubted that.
  2. There was no deal on issues to do with the media with Rupert Murdoch, or indeed with anybody else, either express or implied,” Blair told a 2012 inquiry into media ethics, sparked by revelations that rocked Murdoch’s U.K.

empire. In 2011 it emerged that employees of the News of the World had eavesdropped on the phones of celebrities, politicians, royals and even a teenage murder victim. Murdoch was forced to shut the newspaper, several executives were put on trial and former editor Andy Coulson went to prison.

  • Since then, Murdoch’s News Corp.
  • Has paid tens of millions in compensation to alleged victims, including many who say they were targeted by The Sun.
  • Prince Harry is among celebrities currently suing The Sun over alleged hacking, which the paper has never admitted.
  • Murdoch has condemned the phone hacking and other media misdeeds but claims he was unaware of its scope and blamed a small number of rogue staff.

A newspaperman at heart, Murdoch sensed by the 1980s that the media was changing and that pay television would be a central plank of the future. He launched satellite broadcaster Sky Television from a London industrial estate in 1989 on what he admitted was a “wing and a prayer.” Sky nearly collapsed early on but was salvaged when Murdoch secured the rights to show live Premier League soccer matches in 1992.

  1. Sports helped the company, later known as BSkyB, become a British broadcasting behemoth.
  2. But the phone-hacking scandal forced Murdoch to drop a bid to take full control of Sky, in which he held a roughly 40% share.
  3. He sold his stake in the broadcaster to Comcast in 2018.
  4. Murdoch still owns the Times, Sunday Times and Sun newspapers and struggling news channel Talk TV, but many industry-watchers suspect Lachlan Murdoch, who has much less interest in newspapers than his father, will eventually jettison the British papers.

For now, Rupert Murdoch remains a magnet for the powerful, and those who seek power, in Britain. The guest list for his summer party in June included Prime Minister Rishi Sunak, many members of his Cabinet and opposition Labour Party leader Keir Starmer.

Does post media own the Sun?

History – Sun Publishing was formed on February 4, 1978 through the amalgamation of Toronto Sun Holdings Ltd and Toronto Sun Publishing Ltd. The two companies had been formed in 1971 with the launch of the Toronto Sun by former staffers of the defunct Toronto Telegram,

On February 14, 1978, the Edmonton Sun, the second member of what would become the Sun chain, was announced through a partnership of Sun Media and Edmonton Sun Publishing Ltd. The paper was launched on April 2, 1978. In 1981, the outstanding shares of Edmonton Sun Publishing Ltd were acquired by Sun Media.

The company purchased the Calgary Albertan on July 31, 1980 for $1.3 million and relaunched it days later as the Calgary Sun, with the same format and appearance as its sister papers. In 1983, 50% of Sun Media was acquired by Maclean-Hunter for $55 million.

That same year, Sun Media, with Maclean-Hunter’s backing, acquired the Houston Post for $100 million in an attempt to expand into the United States, It was sold for $150 million four years later. In 1987, Maclean-Hunter’s Financial Post weekly was sold to Sun Media for $46 million and was relaunched as a daily tabloid financial newspaper the following year.

In 1988, Sun Media acquired the Ottawa Sunday Herald which it would relaunch as the daily Ottawa Sun, In 1994, Maclean-Hunter was purchased by Rogers Communications, Two years later, on October 4, 1996, the management of the Sun chain under the leadership of Paul Godfrey purchased Rogers’ share of the Sun Publishing and renamed the company Sun Media.

In 1998, the Financial Post was sold to Southam Inc. in exchange for the Hamilton Spectator, the Kitchener-Waterloo Record, the Guelph Mercury, and the Cambridge Reporter, Also in 1998, Sun Media was purchased by Quebecor and maintained as a wholly owned subsidiary of it. Godfrey had sought out Quebecor as a “white knight” in order to frustrate an attempted hostile takeover by the Sun’s longtime rival, the Toronto Star,

In 1999, Quebcor sold the four recently acquired southern Ontario newspapers to the owners of the Toronto Star and became part of its Metroland Media Group, Southam, owned by Conrad Black, would relaunch the Financial Post as the National Post, In 2007, Sun Media acquired and absorbed the Osprey Media chain of small English language newspapers mostly based in Ontario.

Why is Murdoch stepping down?

“Time is right” – In the statement, Lachlan Murdoch said his father would “continue to provide valued counsel to both companies.” “We thank him for his vision, his pioneering spirit, his steadfast determination, and the enduring legacy he leaves to the companies he founded and countless people he has impacted,” he said.

With Rupert Murdoch stepping back from a leadership role, Lachlan Murdoch’s role is solidified as his father’s successor, and he will oversee tabloids including the New York Post as well as Fox News and Fox Entertainment. In a memo shared with CBS News, Murdoch underscored that he is stepping back while he’s in good health, but added that the “time is right for me to take on different roles.” “Our companies are in robust health, as am I,” he said in the memo.

The media mogul added that Lachlan Murdoch is “absolutely committed to the cause of freedom,” while also aiming a potshot at “elites” who have “open contempt for those who are not members of their rarefied class.”

When did Murdoch buy The Sun?

British newspapers –

In United Kingdom: Newspapers The Sun —long the United Kingdom’s biggest-selling newspaper, whose popularity since it was bought by Rupert Murdoch’s News International company in 1969 has stemmed from a diet of sensational personality-based news stories, show-business gossip, lively sports reporting, and pictures of scantily dressed young women—supported Labour in

What is everything Rupert Murdoch owns?

Rupert Murdoch AC KCSG
Murdoch in 2012
Born Keith Rupert Murdoch 11 March 1931 (age 92) Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Citizenship
  • Australia (until 1985)
  • United States (from 1985)
Education Worcester College, Oxford ( BA )
Occupations
  • Businessman
  • media proprietor
  • investor
Years active 1952−2023
Known for
  • Chairman and CEO of News Corporation (1980–2013)
  • Executive chairman of News Corp (2013–2023)
  • Chairman and CEO of 21st Century Fox (2013–2015)
  • Executive co-chairman of 21st Century Fox (2015–2019)
  • Acting CEO of Fox News (2016–2018)
  • Chairman of Fox News (2016–2019)
  • Chairman of Fox Corporation (2019–2023)
Board member of
  • News Corp
  • Fox Corporation
Spouses Patricia Booker ​ ​ ( m.1956; div.1967) ​ Anna Maria Torv ​ ​ ( m.1967; div.1999) ​ Wendi Deng ​ ​ ( m.1999; div.2013) ​ Jerry Hall ​ ​ ( m.2016; div.2022) ​
Children 6, including Prudence, Elisabeth, Lachlan, and James
Parents
  • Keith Murdoch
  • Elisabeth Greene
Relatives
  • Ivon Murdoch (uncle)
  • Patrick John Murdoch (grandfather)
  • Walter Murdoch (grand-uncle)
Family Murdoch family
Awards Companion of the Order of Australia (1984)
Notes

^ Australian citizenship lost in 1985 (under S17 of Australian Citizenship Act 1948 ) with acquisition of US citizenship.

You might be interested:  Who Is Lucifer'S Mother?

Keith Rupert Murdoch AC KCSG ( MUR -dok ; born 11 March 1931) is an Australian-born American business magnate, media proprietor, and investor. Through his company News Corp, he is the owner of hundreds of local, national, and international publishing outlets around the world, including in the UK ( The Sun and The Times ), in Australia ( The Daily Telegraph, Herald Sun, and The Australian ), in the US ( The Wall Street Journal and the New York Post ), book publisher HarperCollins, and the television broadcasting channels Sky News Australia and Fox News (through the Fox Corporation ).

He was also the owner of Sky (until 2018), 21st Century Fox ( until 2019 ), and the now-defunct News of the World, With a net worth of US$21.7 billion as of 2 March 2022, Murdoch is the 31st richest person in the United States and the 71st richest in the world according to Forbes magazine. After his father ‘s death in 1952, Murdoch took over the running of The News, a small Adelaide newspaper owned by his father.

In the 1950s and 1960s, Murdoch acquired a number of newspapers in Australia and New Zealand before expanding into the United Kingdom in 1969, taking over the News of the World, followed closely by The Sun, In 1974, Murdoch moved to New York City, to expand into the US market; however, he retained interests in Australia and the UK.

In 1981, Murdoch bought The Times, his first British broadsheet, and, in 1985, became a naturalized US citizen, giving up his Australian citizenship, to satisfy the legal requirement for US television network ownership. In 1986, keen to adopt newer electronic publishing technologies, Murdoch consolidated his UK printing operations in London, causing bitter industrial disputes.

His holding company News Corporation acquired Twentieth Century Fox (1985), HarperCollins (1989), and The Wall Street Journal (2007). Murdoch formed the British broadcaster BSkyB in 1990 and, during the 1990s, expanded into Asian networks and South American television.

  • By 2000, Murdoch’s News Corporation owned more than 800 companies in more than 50 countries, with a net worth of more than $5 billion.
  • In July 2011, Murdoch faced allegations that his companies, including the News of the World, owned by News Corporation, had been regularly hacking the phones of celebrities, royalty, and public citizens.

Murdoch faced police and government investigations into bribery and corruption by the British government and FBI investigations in the US. On 21 July 2012, Murdoch resigned as a director of News International, In September 2023, Murdoch announced he would be stepping down as chairman of Fox Corp.

Asked By: Alexander Martin Date: created: Jul 12 2023

Is the Sun newspaper losing money

Answered By: Connor Brooks Date: created: Jul 13 2023

The Sun recorded a loss of £51m last year as the Covid pandemic and a shift of advertising spend online hurt its newspapers, while its parent company sought to end the phone-hacking legal cases that have cost it hundreds of millions of pounds over the past 15 years.

Rupert Murdoch’s News Group Newspapers, which publishes the Sun and retains liability for the activities of the defunct News of the World, spent £49m on legal fees and damages relating to historical phone-hacking allegations in the year to 27 June 2021. This compares with the £80m NGN spent the previous year.

The financial filings show the unnamed highest-paid director of NGN – most likely Rebekah Brooks, the chief executive of parent company News UK – received a 50% increase in remuneration last year to £3.6m. On Thursday, NGN is beginning a two-day hearing at the high court in an attempt to bring an end to the ongoing managed hearings where new potential claimants start legal action each year.

There have been hundreds of cases lodged over the past 15 years – in December NGN agreed a substantial settlement with the actor Sienna Miller to ensure her hacking claims did not go to trial – with lawyers saying there could be thousands of potential victims still to come forward. In terms of the Sun’s financial performance, the company said turnover fell from £324m to £318.6m in the past year.

Digital advertising and other customer revenues, including its betting and gaming operations, were able to partly offset the losses in print, it added. “The decrease in turnover was primarily due to adverse print market conditions exacerbated by the pandemic, particularly in Monday to Friday sales, though performance has continued to improve since the first lockdown and throughout the financial year,” the company said, in its filing to Companies House.

“There were declines in both newspaper circulation and print advertising revenues owing to an industry-wide acceleration in the shift in spend towards online.” By contrast the Times and Sunday Times, also News UK titles, reported record profits over the same financial period, as digital revenues and cover price increases enabled them to buck the wider industry decline.

Their parent group, Times Newspapers Limited (TNL), said pre-tax profits more than tripled from £10m to £34m year-on-year, the highest since the titles started making a profit in 2014. Revenues jumped from £310m to £327m. “The increase in revenue was underpinned by strong growth in digital subscription revenue and digital advertising revenue which, supported by the impact of cover price increases across both titles during the period, were more than able to mitigate industry-wide declines in both newspaper circulation and print advertising,” TNL said.

  • Digital-only paid subscribers hit 399,000 as at the end of last year with total subscriber numbers, including print, passing 600,000.
  • Robert Thomson, the chief executive of News UK’s overall parent News Corporation, said at the publisher’s most recent trading update that the UK operation made its highest profit contribution for the company’s second quarter to the end of December since 2011.

The Christmas quarter also proved to be a milestone for the Sun, which reported that digital advertising income overtook print advertising for the first time. However, the scale of the challenge facing publishers was made clear this month when Reach, the owner of the Daily Mirror and Daily Express as well as hundreds of regional brands, announced that its market value had plunged by a quarter as it warned of significant cost increases.

Sign up to the daily Business Today email or follow Guardian Business on Twitter at @BusinessDesk Reach said the existing issue of rising newsprint costs, caused by growing distribution costs and supply issues, was being exacerbated by soaring energy prices. NGN, which employed an average of 543 editorial staff last year, reported a total wage bill of £42.5m.

The subsidiary’s three directors, including the News UK chief operating officer, David Dinsmore, were paid a combined £6.7m, up from £4.5m in 2020. Last June, it emerged that Rupert Murdoch had written down the value of the Sun newspapers to zero, And last year, in a piece of Fleet Street symbolism, the Sun lost its title of UK’s bestselling newspaper to the Daily Mail,

Who owns the main UK newspapers?

Print – Freedom of the press was established in Great Britain in 1695. Founded by publisher John Walter in 1785, The Times is the first newspaper to have borne that name, lending it to numerous other papers around the world, and is the originator of the widely used Times Roman typeface, created by Victor Lardent and commissioned by Stanley Morison in 1931.

Newspaper and publishing magnate Alfred Harmsworth played a major role in “shaping the modern press” – Harmsworth introduced or harnessed “broad contents, subordinate regional markets, independence from party control” – and was called “the greatest figure who ever strode down Fleet Street.” The Economist was founded by James Wilson in 1843, and the daily Financial Times was founded in 1888.

Founding The Gentleman’s Magazine in 1731, Edward Cave coined the term ” magazine ” for a periodical, and was the first publisher to successfully fashion a wide-ranging publication. Founded by Thomas Gibson Bowles, Vanity Fair featured caricatures of famous people for which it is best known today.

  1. A pioneer of children’s publishing, John Newbery made children’s literature a sustainable and profitable part of the literary market.
  2. The History of Little Goody Two-Shoes was published by Newbery in 1765.
  3. Founded by Sir Allen Lane in 1935, Penguin Books revolutionised publishing in the 1930s through its inexpensive paperbacks, bringing high-quality paperback fiction and non-fiction to the mass market.

Formed in 1940, Puffin Books is the children’s imprint of Penguin Books. Barbara Euphan Todd ‘s scarecrow story, Worzel Gummidge, was the first Puffin story book in 1941. The Guinness Book of Records was the brainchild of Sir Hugh Beaver,E.L. James ‘ erotic romance trilogy Fifty Shades of Grey, Fifty Shades Darker, and Fifty Shades Freed, have sold over 125 million copies globally, and set the record in the United Kingdom as the fastest selling paperback.

  1. Copyright laws originated in Britain with the Statute of Anne (also known as the Copyright Act 1709), which outlined the individual rights of the artist.
  2. A right to benefit financially from the work is articulated, and court rulings and legislation have recognised a right to control the work, such as ensuring that the integrity of it is preserved.

The Statute of Anne gave the publishers rights for a fixed period, after which the copyright expired. The United Kingdom print publishing sector, including books, server, directories and databases, journals, magazines and business media, newspapers and news agencies, has a combined turnover of around £20 billion and employs around 167,000 people.

  1. Popular national newspapers include The Times, Financial Times, The Guardian, and The Daily Telegraph,
  2. According to a 2021 report by the Media Reform Coalition, 90% of the UK-wide print media is owned and controlled by just three companies, Reach plc (formerly Trinity Mirror), News UK and DMG Media,

This figure was up from 83% in 2019. The report also found that six companies operate 83% of local newspapers. The three largest local publishers—Newsquest, Reach and JPI Media—each control a fifth of local press market, more than the share of the smallest 50 local publishers combined.

Asked By: Neil Morris Date: created: Feb 17 2024

Does the Sun make a profit

Answered By: Oscar Barnes Date: created: Feb 20 2024

Content from our partners – The publisher said in its financial accounts for the year to 3 July 2022 published on Thursday : “The final cost may or may not be significantly higher than the amounts recognised depending on the course of the litigation, which in turn may also mean costs end up to be significantly lower than those provided for.

“This has been reported as a one off charge due to its size and incidence. This provision has not been discounted due to the uncertainty over the timing of the resolution of these cases.” An NGN spokesperson said separately: “In 2012, an unreserved apology was made to all of those who had brought cases against the News of the World for voicemail interception.

Since then, NGN has been paying financial damages to claimants. “There are a number of disputed claims still going through the civil courts including some which seek to involve The Sun. The Sun does not accept liability or make any admissions to the allegations.

It is of course common litigation practice for parties to reach a settlement before trial to bring a resolution to the matter for commercial reasons. “As we reach the tail end of litigation, provision has had to be made in the NGN accounts for the ongoing litigation. The figure in the NGN accounts relating to the civil claims is higher this year than the previous financial year as a result of the September cut off date for the bringing of claims which was imposed in the proceedings.

This resulted in claims being brought before that date to avoid being stayed causing a spike in cases. Provision has therefore been made in the accounts for possible costs for the next financial year on top of the actual costs for the 2022-2023 financial year.” The Sun’s revenues, however, grew marginally from £318.6m to £320.5m as digital growth outpaces the decline of print,

The company put this growth primarily down to “higher digital advertising where targeted digital investment helped drive strong growth in audience and advertising yields”. Revenues also benefited from higher content licensing revenues and a slightly longer year of trading with 53 weeks in the financial year.

The publisher also said its expansion into the US, launched in 2020, saw audience up 193% year-on-year and advertising yields grow “significantly”, “incrementally” benefiting revenues. But the NGN accounts do not include the full revenues of the US Sun, which Press Gazette understands is on course to contribute revenues of seven figures per week.

Earnings before interest, taxation, depreciation and amortisation charges (EBITDA) went from a loss of £41.6m in 2021 to a loss of £117.6m. However, once restructuring expenses and one-off operating charges were taken out, this became earnings of £15m, up from £12.9m the year before. Some £4.4m was spent on restructuring the editorial workforce, down from £5.5m in 2021 to do the same, although The Sun had 552 editorial employees on average each month in 2022 up from 543 the year before.

The increase in EBITDA was put down to higher revenues combined with a reduction in costs, achieved through “targeted cost savings” made in the marketing, technology and corporate departments and a decrease in production costs due to lower print volumes.

  • These factors were partly offset by investments made in commercial to help drive revenue growth,” the company said.
  • Meanwhile Times Media (formerly Times Newspapers), publisher of The Times and Sunday Times, reported revenues of £373.4m in the year to 3 July 2022, up 14% on the year before.
  • It said in its own accounts that this was down to a growth in both digital subscriptions and digital advertising, as well as a “rebound” in print advertising, higher content licensing revenues and a 53rd week in the year.
You might be interested:  New Doctor Who Actor?

It reported a pre-tax profit for the financial year of £73.2m, more than double the £34m reported in the year before. At the end of the period, The Times and Sunday Times had 438,000 digital-only subscribers out of a total 641,000. By the end of 2022, according to News Corp’s global accounts, digital-only subscribers across the newspapers, and the Times Literary Supplement, totalled 489,000.

  1. Digital-only paid subscriptions saw the fastest growth yet since The Times launched its online paywall in 2010,
  2. Times Media’s EBITDA, excluding restructuring costs, totalled £82.9m in the year to July, up 58% from £52.5m the year before.
  3. Including restructuring expenses, EBITDA was £79.9m, up from £44.2m.

According to the accounts, Times Media employed an average of 554 editorial staff in 2022, up from 532 the year before. Sister company News UK Broadcasting made a loss of £34m after it launched TalkTV on 25 April last year. It made £1.1m in revenues from advertising and syndication before the end of the financial year on 3 July.

And Talksport Ltd, which also includes Virgin Radio and Times Radio, saw turnover up 56% to £78.3m and reported a swing from a pre-tax loss of £2.2m to profit of £10.7m. Its advertising revenues had been particularly hit by the Covid-19 pandemic in the year before. Earnings from all the News UK subsidiaries are consolidated into parent company News Corp’s news media segment.

In News Corp’s full-year earnings call to the end of June 2022 chief executive Robert Thomson said News UK had contributed an increased profit contribution of $54m (£43m). Email [email protected] to point out mistakes, provide story tips or send in a letter for publication on our “Letters Page” blog

Asked By: Jonathan Wood Date: created: Aug 21 2023

Who is the CEO of the Sun newspaper

Answered By: Douglas Lewis Date: created: Aug 23 2023

History & About – The Daily Sun was incorporated on 29 March 2001. It started production as a weekly on 18 January 2003 and as a daily on 16 June 2003. The target audience is young adults in the 18–45 age bracket and in the A, B, and C social-economic classes.

The paper is similar in format and logo to a popular newspaper,, in the, but the two papers are unrelated. The chairman of the publishing house is Neya Kalu who in May 2022, succeeded her father Dr, a former governor of who currently serves as the, The first Managing Director/Editor-in-Chief was Mike Awoyinfa.

In January 2010 there was a shake-up in which Tony Onyima succeeded Awoyinfa, and the first Deputy Editor-in-Chief, Dimgba Igwe, was replaced by Femi Adesina. Awoyinfa and Igwe remained as directors on the company’s board. Adesina replaced Onyima in December 2013.

Asked By: Timothy Simmons Date: created: Apr 19 2024

Who is the CEO of Sun Pictures

Answered By: Joshua Robinson Date: created: Apr 20 2024

Sun Pictures

Type Subsidiary of Sun Network
Industry Film
Founded 1999
Headquarters Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
Key people Kalanithi Maran (Owner, Founder and Chairman of the Sun Group) Sembian Sivakumar (COO)

What is the history of the Sun newspaper?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This article is about the British newspaper from 1792 to 1876. For similarly titled defunct newspaper published from 1893 to 1906, see The Sun (1893–1906), For current British tabloid, see The Sun (United Kingdom),

For other newspapers and periodicals titled Sun or The Sun, see Sun (newspaper), The Sun was a British evening newspaper established by John Heriot in 1792 and was discontinued in 1876. The paper was founded by members of the Tory government led by William Pitt the Younger to counter the contemporary pro-revolutionary press.

John Heriot, a Scottish journalist and writer, had worked for the Oracle and the World newspapers in 1791, editing both, but did not remain in either post for long. In 1792, at the instigation of Edmund Burke, he was recruited by the British Treasury to establish a pro-government newspaper, the Sun,

This was secretly funded by members of the Tory government, on a private basis. Heriot launched the Sun on 1 October 1792, and it quickly rose to become the second most popular newspaper in Britain, behind The Times, In 1793 he launched a morning paper, the True Briton. It too was funded by the Treasury and maintained a strongly pro-government pro- Tory line.

The True Briton would continue for eleven years before collapsing in 1804. Heriot left newspaper editing to become a Commissioner of the Lottery in 1806. In its early years it was a “violent Tory evening paper” with “an evil reputation”. William Jerdan edited the paper from 1813 to 1817.

In 1825 The Sun was bought by Patrick Grant and Murdo Young (Young also editing it) and its politics switched from Tory to Whig. Young organised teams of reporters, in Parliament and across the country, printed late into the night (unusual for an evening paper) and used mounted delivery riders and the stagecoach system, to ensure that The Sun gathered and distributed news faster than his rivals, sometimes beating the morning papers by 12 hours with news of Parliament, provincial political meetings and sporting events.

In four years he tripled the paper’s sales. A former employee remembered that “Murdo Young was perhaps at the time the most enterprising news publisher in all London, and it was one of the sights of the great Metropolis to witness the despatch of the Express Edition from 112, Strand, to the General Post-Office, St Marin’s-le-Grand.” Newspapers were carried by eight “daring riders” on “8 of the fleetest horses”, to meet the stage coaches carrying the post out of London.

  1. In 1833 Young took full control of The Sun after Grant was declared bankrupt; Grant accused Young of foul play, and started the rival True Sun, with Charles Dickens as a contributor; but the True Sun was a failure and Young bought it and merged it with his Sun in 1837.
  2. The paper was secretly subsidised by the Anti-Corn Law League in 1842 in return for articles supporting their movement.

In the 1840s Young handed over the editorship to William Frederick Deacon and then, in 1845, to Charles Kent (who later married Young’s eldest daughter Ann). All Young’s three daughters, Ann, Catharine (1826-1908) and Floremma, worked as journalists. At least two of them worked for The Sun, with Catherine writing leaders, as well as reporting.

How much is the sun worth?

The Sun’s value is infinite, because without the Sun, almost all life on Earth would die rapidly. There would be no photosynthesis and hence no agriculture. Humans and most other life forms would die of starvation, if they didn’t freeze first.

Who owns the London paper?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The London Paper

Front page of The London Paper
Type Weekday free newspaper
Format Tabloid
Owner(s) News International
Publisher NI Free Newspapers Ltd
Editor Stefano Hatfield
Founded 4 September 2006
Ceased publication 18 September 2009
Circulation approx.500,000 (July 2009)
Website www,thelondonpaper,com

The London Paper (stylised as thelondonpaper ) was a free daily newspaper, published by NI Free Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International (who also own the companies that publish The Sun and The Times ). It was available from Monday to Friday each week in Central London from 4 September 2006 until 18 September 2009 (its final print-run before closure).

Is the Sun newspaper British?

The Sun is a British tabloid daily newspaper owned by News UK, a subsidiary of right- wing, Australian-born American media baron Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp.

Can I sell my story to Sun newspaper?

HOW TO SELL YOUR STORY – AND CUT OUT THE MIDDLEMAN – CALL US NOW!

Tel: 020 7782 4100 Email: [email protected] Text: 07423 720 250 Whatsapp: 07423 720 250

The Sun is the biggest selling paper in Britain – and we have the biggest budgets. We are constantly looking for stories, stories of every kind – whether it’s funny, heart-warming, shocking, scandalous or celeb- based, we want to hear about it. If it’s an amazing picture or video, we want to see it. And if you have then you could be in for a big pay day. How does it work ? It’s simple. You contact us, you pitch the story and if we like it and think it might work then we can explain the rest from there. If you have any concerns then we can address them then.

  1. For example, you want to remain anonymous? That’s fine, just tell us and we can agree that in advance.
  2. Same with a fee.
  3. Once we know what you have, then if we like it, we will make you an offer for it.
  4. We pay more than anyone else.
  5. I wanted to get my story out there and The Sun really helped me.
  6. It was incredible to see it on the front page the next day.

Emma Newcastle There are lots of ‘sell your story’ agents out there who will offer to represent you. They will tell you how experienced they are at selling stories to us and others – and it’s true that we buy stories from them. But remember – they all want a big cut of your fee.

Tel: 020 7782 4100 Email: [email protected] Text: 07423 720 250 Whatsapp: 07423 720 250

How many people buy the Sun newspaper?

Type Daily Newspaper
Readership Mon-Sat 2,254,167 Average Daily Print Saturday 2,622,000 Print
Circulation Mon-Sat 1,357,613 Print
Cover Price Mon-Fri 55p, Sat 75p
Website thesun.co.uk
Asked By: Owen Perry Date: created: Jan 30 2024

What companies are owned by Rupert Murdoch

Answered By: Ryan Patterson Date: created: Jan 31 2024

Is Rupert Murdoch Really Moving on? The 92-year-old media tycoon is set to become chairman emeritus of Fox and News Corporation, but he still wields considerable power over the empire he built. Image Rupert Murdoch revealed a succession plan. Credit. Mary Altaffer/Associated Press Rupert Murdoch’s bombshell retirement announcement on Thursday apparently ended some speculation over a real-life succession story that gripped the business world (and even inspired a ).

  1. Murdoch, 92, will become chairman emeritus of Fox and News Corporation and named, his elder son, as the designated heir.
  2. But is Murdoch really hanging up his spikes? The Times’s Edmund Lee writes on why succession isn’t settled.
  3. Murdoch isn’t about to disappear.
  4. In his, he made clear he would “be watching our broadcasts with a critical eye, reading our newspapers and websites and books with much interest, and reaching out to you with thoughts, ideas, and advice.” In his seven decades as a media baron, Murdoch’s favorite part of the job has been talking to his editors about big stories.

He won’t stop doing that. Murdoch still has a huge say in the companies’ operations. He is the majority shareholder of a family trust that owns significant stakes in each business. The trust manages about 40 percent of the voting stock in News Corp and 43 percent of voting shares in the more valuable Fox.

In other words, he’s still in charge. The real succession battle still looms. When Murdoch dies, four of his children — Lachlan, James, Elisabeth and Prudence — will have an equal say in what happens next because they will inherit his voting shares. And alongside his two other children from another marriage, they stand to inherit a fortune in some kind of deal for the companies.

(The children made out nicely in the $71 billion sale of the majority of Fox’s assets to Disney in 2018, as each got about $2 billion.) The revival of a failed deal could be in the offing. Murdoch tried to combine the two businesses last year, but in January when shareholders balked.

  1. The hugely profitable Fox is driven largely by Fox News, and News Corp is now a hodgepodge that includes newspapers, digital real estate businesses and book publishing.
  2. Both companies have shrunk severely over the years as the media landscape has been taken over by big tech and streaming.
  3. There hasn’t been a growth story to tell investors.

What to watch for: A potential sale of the media empire, either as a whole or in parts. Fox’s stock jumped 3 percent and News Corp’s shares were up 1.3 percent after Murdoch’s announcement, widely outperforming the S&P 500, which fell 1.6 percent. Hard-right Republicans block a defense bill, dealing a blow to Speaker Kevin McCarthy.

  • Hours after the top House Republican signaled that he had won over some holdouts, a handful of his party’s lawmakers, renewing doubts that a government shutdown can be avoided this month.
  • The White House tells federal agencies to consider climate change in procurement decisions.
  • New Biden administration could affect where the federal government spends roughly $600 billion annually on goods and services.

The directive was issued as a judge in Texas by red states to block a federal rule allowing employee retirement plans to consider E.S.G. issues when making investment decisions. Biden says Abrams tanks will start arriving in Ukraine next week. The decision came as Volodymyr Zelensky, Ukraine’s president, visited Washington to for his country despite Republican opposition to the cost of aid growing louder.

  • Meanwhile, the European Commission is reportedly a step closer to starting discussions that would allow,
  • Cisco’s, announced on Thursday, was notable for a number of reasons, including for being the network hardware giant’s biggest-ever takeover — and for what it may portend for the future of megadeals.

The move reflects Cisco’s belief that the transaction will withstand the increased scrutiny of mergers by the Biden administration and other antitrust watchdogs. It suggests that corporate leaders are increasingly confident that heightened opposition to M.&A.

  1. May not be such an impediment.
  2. The deal doesn’t pose a problem for competition — at least not based on traditional antitrust views, Chuck Robbins, Cisco’s C.E.O., told DealBook.
  3. Splunk, which mines customers’ data for insights on security vulnerabilities and other matters, complements rather than competes with his company’s own offerings.
You might be interested:  Person Who Is Self Taught?

“This is not a roll-up,” he said. “We don’t have a lot of overlap in our portfolios.” Investors may need convincing: Though shares in Splunk jumped nearly 21 percent on Thursday, they’re still trading below Cisco’s offer price of $157 a share. But C.E.O.s are taking comfort from recent setbacks for regulators, including to block Microsoft’s nearly $70 billion takeover bid for Activision Blizzard.

That deal is poised to close, after Britain’s antitrust regulator said on Friday that the companies had taken action that ; Microsoft and Activision are aiming to close the transaction by Oct.18. Executives and deal advisers say privately that Biden’s antitrust enforcers may be feeling more gun-shy after the Microsoft defeat.

(A commonly cited piece of evidence is the to Amgen’s $27.8 billion takeover of Horizon Therapeutics.) That said, the F.T.C. and the Justice Department have at least to aggressive enforcement. And the on Thursday, challenging a common private equity strategy of rolling up small businesses to create a more powerful player.

  • That renewed confidence could help bolster the flagging deal-making business, which is down 28 percent year on year, according to LSEG.
  • On Thursday, shares in the ad-tech company Klaviyo finished their second day of trading 12 percent above the price set in its initial public offering.
  • That’s below the heights the stock touched on its first day, but better than what’s happened to shares in the grocery delivery app Instacart and the chip designer Arm, which are now just above their debut prices.

That’s disappointing for investors who bought into the companies on their first days of trading. But David Ludwig, the global head of equity capital markets at Goldman Sachs, who helped lead all three I.P.O.s, argues that the shares are actually performing as well as can be expected in turbulent markets — and that there’s hope for the future.

  • Some analysts said that the companies may have overshot on valuations.
  • Arm priced its offering at $51 a share, the high end of its forecast range, while Instacart priced its stock at the top of an already raised range, and Klaviyo was priced above expectations.
  • Shares in each popped on their first day of trading before drifting down.

Matt Kennedy, a senior strategist at Renaissance Capital, an I.P.O.-focused data firm, suggested that the companies may have miscalculated investor demand. “The next deals will have to price more conservatively,” he told DealBook. But Ludwig noted that the markets have been choppy, with the Nasdaq down nearly 6 percent since the beginning of September and the S&P 500 down 4 percent.

  • The market backdrop has clearly gotten tougher,” he told DealBook.
  • In a market that’s not fully healed yet, I think it’s good that companies can get access to the markets in a fairly efficient manner.” Market expectations for a sudden I.P.O.
  • Resurgence may have been overblown.
  • Given uncertainty over inflation and the Fed’s plans for interest rates, deal makers have actually been pushing back their expectations for a revival into next year.

The I.P.O. calendar for the rest of 2023 looks fairly quiet, save for a few notable exceptions like the sandal maker Birkenstock. The companies that can go public now share a number of qualities, including profitability and — for the more mature companies — strong balance sheets not weighed down by excessive debt, according to Ludwig.

  1. But he hopes that will change: “We expect a moderate reopening in 2023, and as the markets stabilize, the I.P.O.
  2. Window will likely open to a broader array of companies,” he said.
  3. A regional director for the U.A.W.
  4. He told the The Times that Tesla employees were reviving efforts to unionize.
  5. In other labor news: Marathon talks between Hollywood executives and striking Writers Guild of America members ended last night,

As Sam Bankman-Fried, the founder of the failed crypto exchange FTX, prepares for his upcoming criminal trial, his parents are facing accusations too. FTX debtors this week, longtime Stanford Law School professors, claiming they unjustly collected millions in cash, property and donations from the “family business.” The claims are particularly notable in light of Bankman’s and Fried’s academic writings, which explore the nature of wrongdoing, honesty and consequences.

Bankman and Fried have written extensively about moral questions. Bankman, a tax expert, co-wrote a paper : “changing the wording on existing returns to increase the psychological cost of evasion and increase the perceived expectation of detection.” Fried is known for her work in legal ethics. Much of it focuses on consequentialism, a centuries-old idea that deems an action right or wrong depending on its outcomes.

In a 2013 essay, she lamented, pointing to the 2008 housing crisis. She noted soberly that “parental income and education are the most powerful predictors of whether a three-year-old will end up in the boardroom or in prison.” FTX debtors accuse Bankman-Fried’s parents of ignoring “bright red signs,” and say they should have been able to see evidence of fraud at FTX companies.

In a statement, lawyers for Bankman and Fried called FTX’s claims “completely false” and “a dangerous attempt to intimidate Joe and Barbara and undermine the jury process just days before their child’s trial begins.” Bankman joined the FTX payroll last year and complained to his son that his $200,000 salary was inadequate;,

The filing details other perks, including a $16.4 million property in the Bahamas and a $10 million payout.

The FTX debtors want to claw it all back. Deals Policy

David McCormick, the Republican former C.E.O. of Bridgewater who unsuccessfully ran for Pennsylvania’s governorship, is now hoping to, a Democrat. TikTok is fighting more potential bans,, (WSJ)

Best of the rest

“​​China’s quest for human genetic data spurs ” (WaPo) Meet the 34-year-old business school graduate who is now, the Russian mercenary force whose former leader, Yevgeny Prigozhin, was likely assassinated last month. (WSJ), whose work on understanding American health care costs made him a towering figure in his corner of economics, died on Saturday. He was 99. (NYT) entered hospice care seven months ago — and his health is defying everyone’s expectations. (NYT)

We’d like your feedback! Please email thoughts and suggestions to, is a columnist and the founder and editor at large of DealBook. He is a co-anchor of CNBC’s “Squawk Box” and the author of “Too Big to Fail.” He is also a co-creator of the Showtime drama series “Billions.” is the managing editor of DealBook, based in London.

He joined The New York Times in 2022 from the Financial Times, where he held a number of senior roles in Hong Kong and London. joined the The Times in 2022 as a senior editor for DealBook. Previously he was a senior writer and editor at Fortune focusing on business, the economy and the markets. Michael de la Merced joined The Times as a reporter in 2006, covering Wall Street and finance.

Among his main coverage areas are mergers and acquisitions, bankruptcies and the private equity industry. reports from Washington on the intersection of business and policy for DealBook. Previously, she was a senior reporter at Quartz, covering law and politics, and has practiced law in the public and private sectors.

When did Rupert Murdoch buy the Sun newspaper?

Hero or villain? Rupert Murdoch’s exit stirs strong feelings in Britain, where he upended the media Before he hit America, Rupert Murdoch ripped through Britain’s media like a tornado. His newspapers changed the political and cultural weather and swung elections.

His satellite television channels upended the staid broadcasting scene. Journalists and politicians in the U.K. both hailed and reviled the 92-year-old mogul after he as leader of his companies Fox and News Corp., handing control to his son Lachlan. For The Times of London, which he owns, Murdoch was “a trailblazer who changed the media.” Former Prime Minister Boris Johnson said the tycoon “did more than any press baron in the last 100 years to promote the cause of the global free media that is indispensable for democracy and progress.” But to his critics, Murdoch was an unaccountable, malevolent presence in British life.

Nathan Sparkes of Hacked Off, a press reform group that aims to curb tabloid wrongdoing, said Murdoch “presided over a company where widespread illegality occurred and was subsequently covered up.” Ex-Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn argued that Murdoch’s outlets had “poisoned global democracy and spread disinformation on a mass scale.” U.K.

Treasury chief Jeremy Hunt told LBC radio: “He is someone who, love him or loathe him, had a defining influence on all of our lives over the last half-century.” The Australian upstart was all but unknown in Britain when he bought flagging Sunday newspaper the News of the World in 1969, acquiring the daily paper The Sun soon after.

A hands-on owner, he reinvigorated Britain’s stodgy, class-ridden newspaper scene with papers that embraced sports, celebrity, prize giveaways and sex — most infamously with The Sun’ s topless “Page 3 girls.” In a 1989 BBC interview, Murdoch put his success down to his antipodean roots, saying Australians came to the U.K.

with “greater determination and greater energy,” “We did things that people said couldn’t be done,” he said. Populist, pomposity-puncturing and patriotic, Murdoch’s tabloids undeniably had flair. Critics deplored headlines like “Up yours, Delors,” directed at then-European Commission President Jacques Delors, and “Gotcha!” — The Sun ‘s reaction when a British submarine sank the Argentine cruiser Belgrano, killing more than 300 sailors, during the 1982 Falklands War.

The Sun ‘s coverage of the 1989 Hillsborough stadium disaster, in which 96 Liverpool soccer fans were killed, sparked outrage by making false allegations against the victims. More than three decades later, many Liverpudlians still refuse to read The Sun.

  • But politicians from both right and left courted and feared Murdoch, who added The Times and Sunday Times to his stable in 1981.
  • An arch-conservative who also hates the establishment, he was an enthusiastic supporter through the 1980s of Conservative leader Margaret Thatcher, who shared Murdoch’s enmity toward powerful trade unions.

After Thatcher’s Conservative successor John Major unexpectedly triumphed in the 1992 election, the tabloid boasted: “It’s The Sun wot won it.” Tony Blair’s success in securing Murdoch’s backing helped Blair’s Labour Party win a landslide victory in 1997.

Like other politicians, Blair denied giving Murdoch anything in return for his support — though plenty of skeptics doubted that. “There was no deal on issues to do with the media with Rupert Murdoch, or indeed with anybody else, either express or implied,” Blair told a 2012 inquiry into media ethics, sparked by revelations that rocked Murdoch’s U.K.

empire. In 2011 it emerged that employees of the News of the World had eavesdropped on the phones of celebrities, politicians, royals and even a teenage murder victim. Murdoch was forced to shut the newspaper, several executives were put on trial and former editor Andy Coulson went to prison.

  1. Since then, Murdoch’s News Corp.
  2. Has paid tens of millions in compensation to alleged victims, including many who say they were targeted by The Sun,
  3. Is among celebrities currently suing The Sun over alleged hacking, which the paper has never admitted.
  4. Murdoch has condemned the phone hacking and other media misdeeds but claims he was unaware of its scope and blamed a small number of rogue staff.

A newspaperman at heart, Murdoch sensed by the 1980s that the media was changing and that pay television would be a central plank of the future. He launched satellite broadcaster Sky Television from a London industrial estate in 1989 on what he admitted was a “wing and a prayer.” Sky nearly collapsed early on but was salvaged when Murdoch secured the rights to show live Premier League soccer matches in 1992.

  1. Sports helped the company, later known as BSkyB, become a British broadcasting behemoth.
  2. But the phone-hacking scandal forced Murdoch to drop a bid to take full control of Sky, in which he held a roughly 40% share.
  3. He sold his stake in the broadcaster to Comcast in 2018.
  4. Murdoch still owns the Times, Sunday Times and Sun newspapers and struggling news channel Talk TV, but many industry-watchers suspect Lachlan Murdoch, who has much less interest in newspapers than his father, will eventually jettison the British papers.

For now, Rupert Murdoch remains a magnet for the powerful, and those who seek power, in Britain. The guest list for his summer party in June included Prime Minister Rishi Sunak, many members of his Cabinet and opposition Labour Party leader Keir Starmer.

Who owns Sun Times media Group?

With $61M pledged, Chicago Public Media now owns the ‘Sun-Times’ bradhoc/Flickr Chicago Public Media cemented its acquisition of the Chicago Sun-Times newspaper Monday, creating one of the largest nonprofit news organizations in the country. The deal was expected after CPM’s board of directors, CPM announced this week that it raised $61 million in support from national and local foundations and donors, including Builders Initiative, Chicago Community Trust, the Walter and Karla Goldschmidt Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the John S.

  • And James L.
  • Night Foundation, the Mansueto Foundation, Robin Steans and Leonard Gail, and an anonymous donor.
  • The nonprofit previously disclosed Sun-Times investor Michael Sacks as key to the acquisition, as well as the John D.
  • And Catherine T.
  • MacArthur Foundation and the Pritzker Traubert Foundation.

“I am proud to have played a part in securing the future of the Chicago Sun-Times and honoring its great legacy,” Sacks said in, “I would like to thank Chicago Public Media, all those who got behind this vision with their support going forward, and the Sun-Times team including all current and prior investors for making this possible.

Together we have created a model for sustaining local journalism which we know is vital.” Donors have pledged most of their funding over a five-year period, according to CPM. The donations will support collaborations, maintaining the newspaper and investment in a digital transformation for the Sun-Times,

CPM will continue raising money from members, donors and corporate sponsors. The Sun-Times will become a subsidiary of CPM, but the two newsrooms will maintain editorial independence. CPM CEO Matt Moog and Sun-Times CEO Nykia Wright will stay in leadership positions, with Wright reporting to Moog.