Asked By: Ian Gonzalez Date: created: Sep 11 2023

Who are the 8 people carrying the coffin

Answered By: Cody Martinez Date: created: Sep 11 2023

Eight pallbearers who carried the late Queen’s coffin at her funeral are among those to be recognised in a special honours list. The soldiers – who were selected to be pallbearers from the King’s Company (then Queen’s), 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards – have been awarded the silver Royal Victorian Medal.

They were named as recipients of honours under the Royal Victorian Order (RVO) in recognition of their service to the Queen, as part of a special set of Demise awards. Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player November 2022: Late Queen ‘greatly missed’ RVO gifts are bestowed by the King to people who have served the monarch or the Royal Family in a personal way.

Lance Sergeant Alex Turner, Lance Corporal Tony Flynn, Lance Sergeant Elias Orlowski, Guardsman Fletcher Cox, Guardsman James Patterson, Lance Sergeant Ryan Griffiths, Guardsman Luke Simpson, and Guardsman David Sanderson carried the coffin as millions of people watched the funeral last September. The unit had a close connection with the Queen – as the serving monarch she held the position of company commander and made a personal review of the company every decade. Also recognised in the special honours list are the Queen’s closest adviser, Angela Kelly, and pallbearers who carried the Queen’s coffin at her lying-in-rest in Edinburgh.

Ms Kelly, the Queen’s personal assistant, adviser and curator, worked for the monarch for more than 25 years and was made a Commander of the RVO. Spreaker This content is provided by Spreaker, which may be using cookies and other technologies. To show you this content, we need your permission to use cookies.

You can use the buttons below to amend your preferences to enable Spreaker cookies or to allow those cookies just once. You can change your settings at any time via the Privacy Options, Unfortunately we have been unable to verify if you have consented to Spreaker cookies.

To view this content you can use the button below to allow Spreaker cookies for this session only. Click to subscribe to the Sky News Daily wherever you get your podcasts During the COVID lockdown, Ms Kelly was thought to be part of a small group dubbed “HMS Bubble” that the Queen isolated with. Ms Kelly once disclosed in an interview: “We are two typical women.

We discuss clothes, make-up, jewellery.”

How did they choose the coffin bearers?

This article was originally published on September 19, 2022. The coffin bearers at the Queen’s funeral are from a unit of which the late monarch was Company Commander. Soldiers from the Queen’s Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, were chosen to lift the coffin during the service at Westminster Abbey and Windsor Castle.

Although a senior officer took day-to-day control, the former sovereign’s connection with her men was strong, and they paid tribute to her during the service. The Queen’s Company retained its name up until the monarch was laid to rest, and will later change to reflect the new King. Major Adrian Weale, a former British Army soldier, told the PA news agency: “They became the Queen’s Company immediately after the death of George VI and the Queen has been commander ever since.

“It’s their role to protect her body, both in life and in death, remaining the Queen’s Company until King Charles decides otherwise. “Their duties will then be transitioned to the next monarch.” The coffin was moved from the Palace of Westminster to Westminster Abbey for the service at 11am.

A public procession began at 12.15pm as Her late Majesty’s coffin made the 1.5-mile journey from Westminster Abbey to Wellington Arch in London. It was then carried by the state hearse to Windsor in Berkshire, where the late Queen was laid to rest. Major Johnny Hathaway-White, 36, from Wiltshire, laid the Camp Colour of the Captain of the Queen’s Company at Windsor Castle after it was placed onto a catafalque – a raised platform.

It had been at the Regimental Headquarters of the Grenadier Guards being prepared. The colour was presented to the Grenadier Guards by the sovereign after the Queen became the monarch, and it was only paraded in her presence and has never been changed or replaced.

Who are the 6 people that carry the casket?

Three Important Things To Know About Choosing Pallbearers There are generally 6 to 8 pallbearers at a funeral, and you can choose anyone you’d like to serve as one.

Who was the 18 year old coffin bearer?

Jack Burnell-Williams, a trooper, who played a crucial part at the late Queen Elizabeth II’s state funeral last Monday has been found dead at army barracks. – Agencies Jack Burnell-Williams, 18-year-old Guardsman who marched behind the late Queen Elizabeth II’s coffin during her official funeral procession, was discovered dead at London barracks. Jack Burnell-Williams, a member of the Household Cavalry, died on Wednesday, September 28, after being unresponsive at Hyde Park Barracks in Knightsbridge, London, the Army said in a statement.

Trooper Jack Burnell-Williams, 18, was crucial to the Queen’s state burial last Monday. On Wednesday, police and London Ambulance Service paramedics rushed to Hyde Park Barracks in Knightsbridge, London, to try to rescue the young guy. There was nothing they could do, and Burnell-Williams was pronounced dead on the spot.

Laura, 42, tweeted an impassioned tribute to her son, Jak, to family and friends, with a photo of the young soldier, adding that she never imagined she would be writing this. However, as a family, they were all saddened by the tragic demise of our beloved son Jak Williams yesterday.

  1. Reportedly the death is not considered suspicious.
  2. According to a Metropolitan Police spokeswoman, an 18-year-old guy was declared deceased at the site.
  3. His next of kin were informed.
  4. They also stated that the death news brought shock, was investigated, and is not being viewed as suspicious.
  5. Officers will help prepare a report for the coroner.

Burnell-Williams guarded the late monarch’s coffin as it made its final voyage earlier this month, much to the pleasure of his family and friends, at Her Majesty’s burial. His family was overjoyed that their son was serving the Queen on her final voyage.

Why were the coffin bearers chosen?

Queen Elizabeth’s coffin bearers were specifically chosen to protect her body after her death. Soldiers from the Queen’s Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, were chosen to lift the coffin during the service at Westminster Abbey and Windsor Castle.

  1. Although a senior officer took day-to-day control, all of the former sovereign’s men will pay tribute to her during the service.
  2. On the day the Queen died, the unit was deployed on operations in Iraq, and was returned from operations.
  3. Former British Army soldier Major Adrian Weale told the PA news agency: “They became the Queen’s Company immediately after the death of George VI and the Queen has been commander ever since.

READ MORE: Merseyside falls silent to remember Queen Elizabeth II “It’s their role to protect her body, both in life and in death, remaining the Queen’s Company until King Charles decides otherwise. “Their duties will then be transitioned to the next monarch.” The coffin will travel from the Palace of Westminster to Westminster Abbey for the service at 11 am.

A public procession will begin at 12.15 pm as the Queen’s coffin makes the 1.5-mile journey from Westminster Abbey to Wellington Arch in London. The state hearse will then carry it to Windsor in Berkshire, where the Queen will be laid to rest. Major Johnny Hathaway-White, 36, from Wiltshire, will lay the Camp Colour of the Captain of the Queen’s Company at Windsor Castle after it is placed onto a catafalque – a raised platform.

READ NEXT

BBC viewers ‘heartbroken’ by David Attenborough’s appearance at Queen’s procession Prince Harry now allowed to wear military uniform for Queen’s vigil How much will The Queen’s Funeral cost and who will pay for it? Queen’s Funeral Bank Holiday and who will still have to go to work The day Queen Elizabeth II died as it unfolded

You can light a candle for Queen Elizabeth II here or leave a tribute to her here Story Saved You can find this story in My Bookmarks. Or by navigating to the user icon in the top right.

Who is chosen to be a pallbearer?

What do you know about pallbearers? – As intense or scary as this job seems, being a pallbearer is not as overwhelming as you might think. If you were you asked to be a pallbearer for someone’s funeral at a funeral home in Fulton, IL, here’s everything you need to know about pallbearers in order to prepare you.

What is a Pallbearer? A pallbearer is someone that helps carry or officially escorts a casket during a funeral or service. Their duties traditionally consist exclusively of carrying the remains from the hearse to the church or funeral home before the service, and then back into the hearse after the service. If the remains are to be buried or inurned, the pallbearers also carry them from the hearse to the final resting place. What Is an Honorary Pallbearer? An honorary pallbearer is someone who will not actually carry the casket but is still recognized in some way. This title is usually used for older friends or relatives who might not be able to physically carry the casket. Sometimes people even choose to have deceased friends or family members as honorary pallbearers, as they don’t have to carry the casket or even be physically present to have the honor. How Heavy is a Casket? Caskets can weigh as little as 60 pounds up to 400 pounds or more depending on the type of casket and the size of the remains inside. For example, pine caskets generally weigh about 150 pounds, while mahogany can weigh up to 250. Metal caskets, on the other hand, can weigh between 160 to 200 pounds depending on the kind of metal and the metal gauge. What Should Pallbearers Wear? Its best for pallbearers to dress conservatively, ideally in a dark suit and tie, dress, or pantsuit. However, be sure to wear clothing that is comfortable enough for you to move and lift in. Don’t forget to wear flat or low-heeled shoes so you don’t trip while carrying the casket. Who Can be a Pallbearer? Pallbearers can be anyone the bereaved or deceased choose. However, they are usually close family or friends like siblings, older children or grandchildren, colleagues, or friends. And yes, women can be pallbearers even though it doesn’t happen very often. How Many Pallbearers are There? While there can be as many or as few as desired, there are traditionally six to eight pallbearers. If there are six, three stand on each side of the casket. If there are eight, the extra two stand on the front and back. Can You Have Pallbearers at a Cremation? While pallbearers are traditionally used when the body is buried in a casket, people can choose to have pallbearers carry the casket at a funeral before a cremation. They can also carry or walk alongside the urn before or after a memorial service.

Schilling Funeral Home & Cremation is here to help if you have more questions about pallbearers or Fulton, IL funeral homes. Call or visit us today to learn more about what we can do for you in your time of loss,

Asked By: Bryan Gonzales Date: created: Mar 24 2023

How were the 8 pallbearers chosen

Answered By: Diego Murphy Date: created: Mar 26 2023

The British Army has said that the eight men chosen were the ‘very best soldiers’ in the Company – and also that they were the eight tallest men in the Company, chosen for stature and consistent stability, and likely arranged shortest to tallest at the back.

You might be interested:  Who Should Not Wear Tiger Eye Stone?

What happened to the Queen’s coffin bearers?

Image source, Getty Images Image caption, Eight Grenadier Guards carried the coffin of the late Queen during her state funeral Eight pallbearers who carried Queen Elizabeth II’s coffin at her funeral are among those to be recognised in a special honours list.

King Charles has honoured scores of royal aides and military personnel for the roles they played during the period of national mourning. Angela Kelly, the Queen’s dresser, has also received recognition. Queen Elizabeth II, Britain’s longest-serving monarch, died at Balmoral in September last year, aged 96.

In some of the most poignant moments of the late Queen’s funeral, eight Grenadier Guards in uniform carried her coffin, draped in the Royal Standard, into London’s Westminster Abbey and her final resting place at St George’s Chapel in Windsor. Millions of people around the world watched as Lance Sergeant Alex Turner, Lance Corporal Tony Flynn, Lance Sergeant Elias Orlowski, Guardsman Fletcher Cox, Guardsman James Patterson, Lance Sergeant Ryan Griffiths, Guardsman Luke Simpson, and Guardsman David Sanderson carried out their duty.

Notably they carried the lead-lined coffin with the Imperial State Crown, sceptre and orb on top up the steep steps of the chapel in Windsor Castle’s grounds. Conservative MP Tom Hunt said at the time: “I can’t imagine how hard and emotionally challenging it must have been to have carried her late Majesty’s coffin just once.

“With billions watching, they’ve done her late Majesty and the country proud.” The soldiers, from the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, have been recognised with the Royal Victorian Medal (Silver). Royal Regiment of Scotland pallbearers who brought the Queen from Balmoral to her lying-in-state at St Giles’ Cathedral in Edinburgh received the same honour.

The Royal Air Force flight crew who transported the Queen’s coffin from Scotland to London, other coffin bearers, and senior government officials are also included in the Demise Honours list. Image source, Getty Images Image caption, The late Queen with Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour and the monarch’s dresser Angela Kelly (on right in black) Ms Kelly, who worked for the Queen for more than 25 years, has been made a Commander of the Royal Victorian Order (RVO).

The pair are understood to have had a close relationship, and the Queen gave Ms Kelly permission to write a behind-the-scenes account of her years as her official dressmaker and friend. Ms Kelly helped to keep the Queen’s style modern and relevant – the late monarch once wore a pair of glasses personalised with Swarovski crystals in the shape of the letter Q at a 2010 film screening in Canada.

  1. During the height of the Covid pandemic, Ms Kelly is thought to have isolated with the Queen at Windsor Castle as part of a small group of royal household staff.
  2. Image source, PA Media Image caption, The late monarch’s stud groom, Terence Pendry, with her pony Emma The late Queen’s page, Paul Whybrew, who appeared in the monarch’s 2012 London Olympics skit with James Bond actor Daniel Craig, was awarded Commander of the RVO.

Terence Pendry, who worked as the Queen’s stud groom and held the reins of her pony, Emma, as the funeral cortege travelled through Windsor, received the same honour. Former ladies-in-waiting Philippa de Pass and Jennifer Gordon Lennox were made Dame Commanders of the RVO.

How heavy was the Queen’s coffin?

It has been estimated that it would weigh between 250kg and 317kg. Eight military bearers have been selected to carry the Queen’s coffin on the day of her funeral. According to the Ministry of Defence, the bearer party is formed of eight soldiers from the Queen’s Company 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards.

Who is guarding the queens coffin?

Who is guarding the Queen? – The Queen’s coffin, which is adorned by the Royal Standard, is resting on a raised platform called a catafalque. It has the Imperial State Crown on top. Each corner is guarded 24 hours a day by soldiers from units that serve the Royal Household.

  • Three ceremonial units, the Gentlemen at Arms, the Royal Company of Archers and the Yeomen of the Guard, will stand guard in a 24-hour vigil, switching places every 20 minutes.
  • It is also expected that the royals will perform a Vigil of the Princes at some point as well, a tradition that has taken place twice before.

The late Queen Mother’s four grandsons – the former Prince of Wales, the Duke of York, the Earl of Wessex and Viscount Linley, now the Earl of Snowdon – stood guard over her coffin in her honour in 2002 as people continued to walk through Westminster Hall.

Ing George V’s sons – Edward VIII, the Duke of York (later George VI), Henry, Duke of Gloucester and George, Duke of Kent – carried out the first such tribute in 1936 for their father, late in the evening on the final night of his lying in state. There was no such vigil for George VI – when he died, he had two daughters and his grandchildren were very young.

The Duke of York is expected to return to military uniform for the final vigil around the Queen’s coffin during the lying in state, according to sources. They also performed it when the Queen was lying in state in Edinburgh’s St Giles’ Cathedral. Charles III led the moment of reflection on Monday evening.

Can a son be a pallbearer for his mother?

Wednesday, November 30, 2016 Pallbearers are the individuals who carry or escort the casket at a funeral service. Typically, there are anywhere from 6-8 pallbearers present for a funeral service, depending on the handles on the casket that has been chosen for the deceased.

  1. In some case’s there are two handles on each end as well as three on each side, allowing eight people to serve as pallbearers.
  2. When you have been chosen to serve as a pallbearer at a funeral service for a loved one, this is truly an honor.
  3. If you are pre-planning a funeral and deciding who you wish to have as your pallbearers, think about who you would like to have this honor to.

Typically, pallbearers are family members or close friends. Both women and men serve as pallbearers. The decision lays on the mere fact that a casket is a heavy, physical carrying and the person selected must be able to bear the weight. Although there are honorary pallbearers, where in some cases when someone is not physically capable of carrying the casket, they walk next to the casket as it is being carried and follow.

  • There is absolutely no limit as to how any people can serve as honorary pallbearers.
  • Common choices for selecting pallbearers are siblings, adult children, grown grandchildren, nieces and nephews, close friends, and colleagues.
  • Anyone you choose can serve as a pallbearer at your funeral.
  • As pallbearers are the individuals who escort the casket, if there is no casket, or a cremation was planned rather than a burial, there is, in this case, no need for pallbearers and would only be appropriate if there will be a casket present for the service.

If you have any questions on this topic or would like to speak to our professionals here at, Tindall Funeral Home, you can contact us here and we will be happy to help you find the answers you may be seeking.

Asked By: Miles Barnes Date: created: Mar 30 2024

Has there ever been a female pallbearer

Answered By: Jeffery Patterson Date: created: Mar 30 2024

Wednesday, July 28, 2021 At Gallagher Funeral Home, we sometimes have some clients asking us whether women can be pallbearers. This question is not an unusual one. In most instances, men are pallbearers, so it seems like the norm. However, there is no cultural or religious customs stating that women can’t serve as pallbearers.

The only reason why they don’t do this job is that they may not be strong enough to lift the casket, which can sometimes be quite heavy. Many elaborate wooden or metal caskets can easily weigh up to 300 pounds or more. However, if a physically able woman wants to be a pallbearer, there is no reason why she can’t.

Pallbearers need to be emotionally and physically strong. Just as they need to manage to lift the casket, they should not break down while doing so. In short, there is no gender bias in the picture when it comes to who can be a pallbearer.

Was the soldier found dead at the Queen’s funeral?

Soldier, 18, who took part in Queen’s state funeral found dead at barracks

A teenage soldier who took part in the Queen’s state funeral has been found dead at his barracks.Household Cavalry Trooper Jack Burnell-Williams was among those to escort the s coffin as it was carried by gun carriage through Whitehall and down the Mall following the service at Westminster Abbey.The Army has confirmed that the 18-year-old, from Bridgend, South Wales, died on Wednesday at Hyde Park Barracks in Knightsbridge.Police are not treating his death as suspicious.He was believed to be one of the newest recruits to the Household Cavalry.An Army spokesman said: “It is with sadness that we can confirm the death of Trooper Jack Burnell-Williams on 28 September 2022 at Hyde Park Barracks.”Our thoughts are with the soldier’s family and friends at this difficult time and we ask that their privacy is respected.”The case has been referred to the coroner.Sharing a picture and tribute on Facebook to her son, known as Jak by his family and friends, his mother Laura Williams, 42, wrote: “Never ever thought I would be saying this but we as a family are all heartbroken with the sudden passing of our wonderful son Jak Williams.”On the day of the Queen’s funeral, his father Daniel Burnell shared a video of troops from the Household Cavalry accompanying the flag-draped royal coffin.

He wrote: “My son doing his duty for the Queen on her final journey. So proud of you Jak Williams xx very proud father xx.” Anyone feeling emotionally distressed or suicidal can call Samaritans for help on 116 123 or email in the UK. In the US, call the Samaritans branch in your area or 1 (800) 273-TALK : Soldier, 18, who took part in Queen’s state funeral found dead at barracks

Asked By: Joseph Jenkins Date: created: Jun 03 2023

Who was the youngest pallbearer for the Queen

Answered By: Jose Evans Date: created: Jun 05 2023

EXCLUSIVE: Queen’s pallbearers who carried Her Majesty’s coffin Published: 13:43 BST, 21 September 2022 | Updated: 17:12 BST, 25 September 2022

  • The eight pallbearers who heroically carried ‘s 500lb lead-lined coffin included a teenage ‘underdog’ whose ‘sole ambition’ was to serve Elizabeth II, a bodybuilder bearer, a surf-mad soldier plus the Sandhurst instructor who led them, MailOnline can reveal today.
  • The soldiers have been praised for perfecting the task on Her Majesty’s final and saddest journey while watched by billions around the globe as their families described their deep pride at what they did for ‘Queen and country’.
  • But their most important job was carried out in private, when they laid Her Majesty to rest with her husband, father, mother and sister in the royal tomb at St George’s Chapel, Windsor, with a small audience of just the King and his close relatives on Monday night.
  • Today MailOnline can name the eight soldiers from the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, who were flown back from operational service in Iraq to take part in Monday’s funeral.
  • The youngest hero was Fletcher Cox, 19, from Jersey, who finished ‘top of his class’ as a cadet aged just 15 where he was handed the highest accolade any young soldier can achieve on the Channel Islands – the Lieutenant-Governor’s medal – and gave a speech where he said his ‘sole ambition’ was to parade for the Queen.
You might be interested:  Tribute To A Friend Who Passed Away Quotes?

The band of brothers were expertly guided throughout by Company Sergeant Major Dean Jones, an instructor at The Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, where Prince Harry trained to be an officer. Famously the Queen reviewed Harry when he was commissioned as an officer in the British Army in 2006 – with both unable to hide their grins.

  1. ‘Bodybuilder’ James Patterson
  2. James is a keen bodybuilder – whose strength was useful as the soldiers carried the heavy lead lined coffin up the steep stairs of St George’s.
  3. His Facebook page shows him in various poses wowing friends with his muscly frame.
  4. He attended the King Edward VI School in Bury St Edmunds, before studying at West Suffolk University, according to his social media pages.

Guardsman David Sanderson: One of the Queen’s pallbearers, from Morpeth, Northumberland, whose family declared their pride for what he has done for ‘Queen and country’

  • David Sanderson, 19, whose sense of duty is ‘in his blood’
  • David Sanderson is a British soldier who has served in the King’s Guard and lives in Morpeth, Northumberland.
  • David attended King Edward Vl secondary school in Morpeth before leaving at 16 to join the Army Foundation College in Harrogate.
  • By the time he was 17 he was stationed at the regimental headquarters of the Grenadier Guards at Wellington barracks, first joining the second battalion.
  • He then moved to the first battalion, the Queen’s Division, like his late grandfather John.
  • The 19-year-old left his parents filled with ‘indescribable pride’ as their son took on the ‘enormous responsibility’.
  • But such David’s dedication to his solemn duty that he did not breathe a word that he had been chosen as a pallbearer to his parents and younger brother.
  • Instead, they only found out his involvement when photographs of the funeral rehearsals were published by MailOnline.
  • His father, Peter, 56, said: ‘The dignity and composure all those young men showed throughout that service was amazing and we’re find it difficult to put into words how proud we feel of David.

‘It was an incredible honour to be chosen for that role, the enormity of it is hard to comprehend, but David has taken it in his stride and performed his duty to perfection. It’s nice to hear people saying that they ought to receive an honour but I know that David will simply say ‘It was my duty’ and he won’t ask any more than that.

  • ‘Of course the fact that he’d been chosen was not to be shared with anyone, so he didn’t even tell us, he couldn’t.
  • We only became aware of it when we saw photographs of the rehearsal drills on Mailonline and I said to my wife ‘that looks like David.’ Pallbearer David Sanderson with parents and brother.

The 19-year-old left his parents filled with ‘indescribable pride’ as their son took on the ‘enormous responsibility’ Grenadier guardsman and pallbearer David Sanderson’s grandfather posing with the Queen in 1958 ‘The day of the funeral confirmed everything and it was hard to believe you were watching your own son, a young man of 19, with that enormous responsibility placed on him.

  1. ‘He’ll be back on leave before his next deployment and I can’t wait to see him just to tell how immensely proud he has made us.’
  2. Mr Sanderson said the Grenadiers were in his son’s blood and ‘all he has ever wanted to do’.
  3. His proud grandfather Les Dixon, a retired police officer, added: ‘Myself and my daughter, son in law, and every one of our family are very proud of David and what he has achieved, for himself and our Country’.
  4. David was also part of the guard of honour that welcomed Prince Philip to Windsor at his funeral in April 2021.

His father added: ‘The Grenadiers was in his blood, it’s all he has ever wanted to do. His grandfather served with the Queen’s Company, joining in 1958, so David was very aware of the history of the regiment.

  • ‘But he wasn’t following in anyone’s footsteps, he’s his own man with his own ambitions and he wanted to be part of the history and prestige of the Queen’s Company.
  • ‘When he got in he can’t have imagined he’d end up performing that particular duty, but he has an it’s an achievement he can be proud of for the rest of his life.
  • ‘I imagine when he gets back to Morpeth there’ll be a few people offering to buy him a drink and he deserves it, he did us all proud.
  • ‘I look forward to seeing him but I know he’ll be deployed somewhere soon, they are an infantry division and are on active service around the world.’

Guardsman Luke Simpson: The soldier from Selston, Nottinghamshire, was praised by his former teachers at Ashfield School for his role in the funeral

  1. Luke Simpson, who ‘did his village proud’
  2. Luke Simpson, from Selston, Nottinghamshire, was praised by his former teachers at Ashfield School for his role in the funeral.
  3. Head teacher John Maher said he took his place ‘centre stage on such a historic occasion’ and executed his duties ‘so professionally’.
  4. A post on Selston Football Club’s Facebook page read: ‘Respect to you Luke Simpson, flawless under pressure with the whole world watching on.
  5. ‘You have done your country, village, family and friends proud!’

Guardsman Fletcher Cox: The youngest of the pallbearers was believed to be 19-year-old Fletcher Cox, a star former cadet from Jersey whose one ambition was to serve the Queen

  • Fletcher Cox, 19, who was ‘always a great student’ at school
  • Guardsman Fletcher Cox, from the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards, was one of eight chosen to carry the coffin of the longest-reigning monarch in British history – and also the youngest.
  • The 19-year-old from Jersey attended Grainville School on the Channel Island and joined the Army Cadet Forces detachment at the school before leaving aged 16 for military school.

Cox, a former Army cadet, fulfilled his childhood ambition by joining the Grenadier Guards. But he could scarcely have imagined he would be trusted to carry the Queen’s coffin. Assistant Headteacher Jonathan Kellett spoke of the school’s pride at seeing a former pupil shouldering a momentous responsibility – claiming the qualities displayed shone through early in Fletcher’s school career.

Mr Kellett said: ‘We’re immensely proud of Fletcher here at Grainville, and what he’s gone on to do. He was a great student for us and showed great leadership qualities. It was a very proud moment for us as a school. ‘We have a motto that we want our students to do their best and obviously he was doing his best in his chosen career, which is to serve Queen and country.’ Fletcher Cox was at the back of the coffin both during the funeral and the procession of the Queen’s casket from Buckingham Palace to Westminster Hall.

He was awarded the Lieutenant-Governor’s medal in 2018 – the highest honour a Jersey cadet can be given, leaving the Channel island at 16 to attend a military training college in the UK. Lance Sergeant Jake Orlowski: A star of the London Guards before being transferred to the Grenadier Guards

  1. ‘Star of London Guards’ Jake Orlowski
  2. Lance Sergeant Jake Orlowski was in front of Fletcher Cox.
  3. The Lance Sergeant, a dog lover from the capital, was a star of the London Guards before being transferred to the Grenadier Guards.

Lance Sergeant Ryan Griffiths: A keen surfer when not serving his country, had proudly shared a picture of himself carrying the Queen

  • ‘Keen surfer’ Ryan Griffiths
  • Lance Sergeant Ryan Griffiths is a keen surfer when not serving his country.
  • He had proudly shared a picture of himself carrying the Queen and praised by a friend who served with him in the Army.

Lance Corporal Tony Flynn: He married in July and lives in Aldershot – the garrison town in Hampshire Newlywed Tony Flynn Lance Corporal Tony Flynn was next. He married his sweetheart Hayley in July and they live in Aldershot – the garrison town in Hampshire.

  1. Father-of-one Dean Jones
  2. CSM Jones is a married father-of-one.
  3. He led the bearer party in Westminster Abbey and when the world held its breath when they carefully carried the Queen up the steps of St George’s Chapel, Windsor.
  4. The tall warrant officer, resplendent in a ceremonial red tunic, walked ahead of Her Majesty’s oak coffin which weighed over 500lb due to its lead lining.
  5. His team did not put a foot wrong as first they shouldered her coffin.

Lance Sergeant Alex Turner: The soldier chosen to be at the front of the coffin Alex Turner And finally, at the front of the coffin was Lance Sergeant Alex Turner, who expertly steered the casket behind their Company Sergeant Major Dean Jones. The mystery pallbearer: The officer at the rear who steadied the coffin with the Imperial State Crown resting on top into St.

  • It comes after the Ministry of Defence declined to comment on the names of the soldiers today.
  • The eight Grenadier Guards who bore the Queen’s coffin could be given certificates instead of being made Members of the Order of the British Empire (MBEs), despite calls for the hand-picked pallbearers to win the accolades.
  • Military leaders, politicians and celebrities have all backed calls for ‘s faultless pallbearers to be made MBEs.
  • Former head of the Army Lord Dannatt, MPs Dan Jarvis and Tobias Ellwood and SAS: Who Dares Wins star Ant Middleton agreed that the soldiers should be made Members of the British Empire (MBEs).
  • There is a historical precedent for such an award as the Grenadiers who were responsible for bearing Sir Winston Churchill’s coffin in 1965 received the British Empire Medal (BEM).

At the time, the BEM was awarded to soldiers holding the rank of warrant officer and below for meritorious service. Officers ranked lieutenant and higher received the MBE. This distinction ended after a review in 1993. Lord Dannatt said the MBE would be a fitting reward for the pallbearers who ’embodied the professionalism of the Armed Forces’.

Mr Ellwood, head of the Commons defence committee, said: ‘Their performance did the Queen and the nation proud.’ Mr Middleton, a former Special Forces operative, said they ‘deserved nothing less than an MBE’. Britain’s armed forces delivered a masterclass in ceremonial duties. Thousands of troops paid a most fitting tribute to Her Majesty the Queen.

Queen Elizabeth II’s casket arrives at Windsor’s St. George’s Chapel on Monday, following a service in Westminster Abbey Pallbearers transfer the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II, draped in the Royal Standard, into the State Hearse at Wellington Arch in London Also at the forefront of the procession were the 148 sailors who accompanied the State Gun Carriage.

The massed ranks of Royal Navy personnel marched arm in arm at 75 paces per minute, drawing the carriage forward by ropes in a solemn tradition dating back more than a century. The State Gun Carriage was first used at Queen Victoria’s funeral on February 2 1901. The two-and-a-half tonne carriage subsequently appeared at the funerals of three monarchs, King Edward VII, King George V and King George VI, as well as the funerals of Sir Winston Churchill and Lord Mountbatten.

Former equerries to the Queen marched alongside her hearse accompanied by members of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen at Arms and Yeomen of the Guard. The grand procession was formed of seven groups, each supported by a band. Mounties of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police led the first group, followed by representatives of the George Cross foundations of Malta, the Royal Ulster Constabulary and troops from Australia and New Zealand.

Current and former service chiefs also took part. Another former military officer, Tobias Ellwood MP, said: ‘The scale and splendour of our military, as we said goodbye to our Queen, was nothing short of outstanding.’ While 1,650 troops took part in the procession from Westminster Abbey to Wellington Arch, a further 1,000 lined the route through London and another 1,000 performed ceremonial and security duties in Windsor.

You might be interested:  Brinks Mat Robbery Who Was Involved?

In total, 5,948 members of the Armed Forces deployed on Operation London Bridge – as plans for Her Majesty’s passing were known – since her death. And around 175 troops from Commonwealth countries also took part. The Queen’s Company – from which the pallbearers were drawn – was named after the late monarch and she was its honorary commander.

Her Majesty also became Colonel-in-Chief of the Grenadier Guards earlier this year, replacing Prince Andrew. Once she had been driven by hearse to Windsor, there was another symbolic act to acknowledge her affiliation with the Queen’s Company. Moments before she was entombed in the Royal Vault, King Charles III draped its colours over her coffin.

The Queen’s Company is expected to be renamed in the King’s honour later this year. He may also inherit his mother’s honorary colonelcy of the regiment. : EXCLUSIVE: Queen’s pallbearers who carried Her Majesty’s coffin

How many bearers does it take to carry a coffin?

Four minute read Many people instinctively want to carry their friend or family member’s coffin. But they are worried that they won’t know what to do, don’t think they will be strong enough or are unsure about whether or not it’s allowed. This is understandable — few of us will ever have done this before.

But, at Poppy’s, we believe that no one should be denied this opportunity, if it is possible and the right thing for them. We’ve helped children, elderly people and disabled people — as well as all-female groups — to feel comfortable and confident in carrying the coffin. Planning a funeral? Find out more about Poppy’s and our approach to great death care.

Carrying the coffin is often an emotionally-charged experience, one which makes a person’s death seem very real. It can be an important way for you to say goodbye to the person who has died, supporting them and accompanying them on their final journey.

  • Although some cemeteries do not allow friends and family members to lower the coffin into the grave, many do.
  • We’d support and encourage you to take an active role in this part of the funeral ceremony as well.
  • This blog walks you through some of the advice and guidance that we give every week, to help people prepare to carry the coffin of someone close to them.

But remember, this is only guidance, every situation is different and there is no one-size-fits-all. We will work together, assess risks and make adjustments to make sure it feels right for you.1. Your funeral director should explain everything you need to know in clear and practical terms.

They will talk you through the route, how to lift the coffin safely and exactly what you need to do at each stage. They are there to support you and the other bearers. Don’t be afraid to ask questions.2. It takes between four and eight people to carry the coffin, depending on its size. Six is usually a good number.

You don’t have to be tall, able-bodied or particularly strong, and the role of bearer is not restricted to any particular gender or age. If you are not able to carry the coffin because of your health or strength, you can still arrange to walk alongside it, putting a hand on the coffin without bearing its weight.3.

  1. Your funeral director will make sure the bearers are well spaced out and facing each other by the hearse.
  2. They will pass out the coffin so that you can take its weight as it moves towards you.
  3. You will support the coffin at waist height from underneath, not by its handles, as these are not load-bearing.

Once the coffin is fully out of the hearse, the funeral director will say “Ready to lift Lift” and then you will lift the coffin to your shoulders.4. When it is time to move off, your funeral director will say “Ready with left Left”. Then you will start walking with your left foot first.

It helps to keep an eye on the person in front as you go. You can walk at whatever pace is comfortable: you don’t have to march or keep perfectly in step.5. When it’s time to stop, your funeral director will say “Into hands”. This guides you that it’s time to lift the coffin down from your shoulders into your hands again, and then to gently lower it into position.

You will find that you are naturally standing face to face with the other bearers again.6. I f you are also lowering the coffin into the grave, there are a few extra things to be aware of. A couple of strong lengths of wood will be placed across the open grave for the coffin to rest on (these are called ‘putlogs’).

  • There are strips of fabric (called ‘webbing’) underneath the coffin.
  • When it is time to lower, you and the other bearers will take hold of the ends of the webbing and the putlogs will be removed by cemetery staff, so that the coffin is supported by the webbing.
  • Gently lower the coffin, by releasing the webbing, hand over hand.

As before, your funeral director will be there to guide and support you.7. Once the coffin is lowered, many people want to back-fill the grave, by throwing in soil, petals or flowers. This can be a moving and powerful way for everyone, whatever age or ability, to get involved in saying goodbye.

  • Not all cemeteries allow this, but if this is important to you, then we can let you know which cemeteries enable you to do this.
  • Find out more about what a funeral director does and how they can support you in making your own choices.
  • As well as carrying the coffin, there are so many ways to do more for yourself when planning a funeral,

To stay in touch with all the latest news and updates from Poppy’s by email, sign up here,

Who is chosen to be a pallbearer?

What do you know about pallbearers? – As intense or scary as this job seems, being a pallbearer is not as overwhelming as you might think. If you were you asked to be a pallbearer for someone’s funeral at a funeral home in Fulton, IL, here’s everything you need to know about pallbearers in order to prepare you.

What is a Pallbearer? A pallbearer is someone that helps carry or officially escorts a casket during a funeral or service. Their duties traditionally consist exclusively of carrying the remains from the hearse to the church or funeral home before the service, and then back into the hearse after the service. If the remains are to be buried or inurned, the pallbearers also carry them from the hearse to the final resting place. What Is an Honorary Pallbearer? An honorary pallbearer is someone who will not actually carry the casket but is still recognized in some way. This title is usually used for older friends or relatives who might not be able to physically carry the casket. Sometimes people even choose to have deceased friends or family members as honorary pallbearers, as they don’t have to carry the casket or even be physically present to have the honor. How Heavy is a Casket? Caskets can weigh as little as 60 pounds up to 400 pounds or more depending on the type of casket and the size of the remains inside. For example, pine caskets generally weigh about 150 pounds, while mahogany can weigh up to 250. Metal caskets, on the other hand, can weigh between 160 to 200 pounds depending on the kind of metal and the metal gauge. What Should Pallbearers Wear? Its best for pallbearers to dress conservatively, ideally in a dark suit and tie, dress, or pantsuit. However, be sure to wear clothing that is comfortable enough for you to move and lift in. Don’t forget to wear flat or low-heeled shoes so you don’t trip while carrying the casket. Who Can be a Pallbearer? Pallbearers can be anyone the bereaved or deceased choose. However, they are usually close family or friends like siblings, older children or grandchildren, colleagues, or friends. And yes, women can be pallbearers even though it doesn’t happen very often. How Many Pallbearers are There? While there can be as many or as few as desired, there are traditionally six to eight pallbearers. If there are six, three stand on each side of the casket. If there are eight, the extra two stand on the front and back. Can You Have Pallbearers at a Cremation? While pallbearers are traditionally used when the body is buried in a casket, people can choose to have pallbearers carry the casket at a funeral before a cremation. They can also carry or walk alongside the urn before or after a memorial service.

Schilling Funeral Home & Cremation is here to help if you have more questions about pallbearers or Fulton, IL funeral homes. Call or visit us today to learn more about what we can do for you in your time of loss,

Can females be pallbearers?

Wednesday, July 28, 2021 At Gallagher Funeral Home, we sometimes have some clients asking us whether women can be pallbearers. This question is not an unusual one. In most instances, men are pallbearers, so it seems like the norm. However, there is no cultural or religious customs stating that women can’t serve as pallbearers.

  1. The only reason why they don’t do this job is that they may not be strong enough to lift the casket, which can sometimes be quite heavy.
  2. Many elaborate wooden or metal caskets can easily weigh up to 300 pounds or more.
  3. However, if a physically able woman wants to be a pallbearer, there is no reason why she can’t.

Pallbearers need to be emotionally and physically strong. Just as they need to manage to lift the casket, they should not break down while doing so. In short, there is no gender bias in the picture when it comes to who can be a pallbearer.

Is the husband a pallbearer?

Wednesday, February 22, 2017 It is important to note that pallbearer can be any close to the deceased; they are the select family members and friends. They are the ones that carry the casket. However, in most cases, because of the sheer weight of the casket it is normally men that serve as the pallbearers.

  • Yet, we are seeing an increase in female pallbearers over the past several years.
  • When selecting a pallbearer it normally ranges from 6-8 people.
  • They are normally the people closest to the deceased, such as family or friends.
  • Traditionally it is 6 people that will help escort the casket.
  • But in some cases, if you can’t narrow it down to six you can make it to 8 by having on at the front handle and one of the back.

It is important to choose the right people to serve as pallbearers. It is a huge honour to be select as a pallbearer because they are the ones escorting your loved one to their final journey. When you are thinking of whom to select as pallbearers, try writing down a list of people that are very close to the deceased such as close friends, adult children or siblings.

  • When considering, your pallbearers, also think of the physical fitness side of it, the casket is extremely heavy, thus your pallbearers need to be able to support that weight.
  • Subsequently, once you have selected your 6-8 pallbearers, sit down with them and communicate the importance of their role to the service.

It is important not only that they understand the importance of their role, but also they are also comfortable with it. Although it is an honour to be a pallbearer that does not mean that everyone would be comfortable with that. If someone is not comfortable being a pallbearer, you can always make the offer to be an honorary pallbearer.