Asked By: Colin Long Date: created: Aug 22 2023

What horses won the Grand National today

Answered By: Graham Griffin Date: created: Aug 25 2023

Grand National Results 2023: Finishers

Position Horse SP
1 Corach Rambler 8/1F
2 Vanillier 20/1
3 Gaillard Du Mesnil 10/1
4 Noble Yeats 10/1

Who won the Aintree Grand National today?

Corach Rambler wins Grand National after protesters force delay to race Ireland has conquered most of Britain’s major National Hunt races in recent years but like the Gaulish village in the Asterix series, one stable in Scotland continues to resist. Lucinda Russell went into this year’s as the last British trainer to saddle the winner, with One For Arthur in 2017, and she defied a record Irish contingent to land the world’s most famous steeplechase for the second time in six years as Corach Rambler, the 8-1 favourite, got home from the fast-finishing Vanillier by two-and-a-quarter lengths.

  1. Few trainers or jockeys get to enjoy even a single National winner, but Russell and Derek Fox, Corach Rambler’s rider, are now in the even more exclusive club of dual winners, though for Fox, it was a close-run thing.
  2. On Saturday morning, he was doing press-ups on the floor of the medical room, to prove to the racecourse doctor that he had fully recovered from a fall on 6 April which aggravated an issue with his shoulder.

And even though Brian Hughes, the reigning champion over jumps, was on standby for the ride if Fox failed to pass the doctor, it is hard to imagine that any replacement could have produced as polished a performance as Fox in a dramatic, ever-changing race.

Finishers 1st CORACH RAMBLER 8-1 FAVOURITE; 2nd Vanillier 20-1 2 1/4 lengths; 3rd Gaillard Du Mesnil 10-1 4 3/4 lengths; 4th Noble Yeats 10-1 1 1/2 lengths; 5th The Big Dog; 6th Born By The Sea; 7th Roi Mage; 8th Mister Coffey; 9th A Wave Of The Sea; 10th Le Milos; 11th Our Power; 12th Enjoy D’Allen; 13th Fortescue; 14th Carefully Selected; 15th Minella Trump; 16th Francky Du Berlais; 17th Ain’t That A Shame Non-finishers 1st Cloudy Glen (UR – unseated rider); Recite A Prayer (UR); Diol Ker (UR); Galvin (UR); Hill Sixteen (Fell); 2nd Darasso (UR); Fury Road (Fell); The Big Breakaway (Fell); 8th Longhouse Poet (UR); 9th Lifetime Ambition (UR); 14th Cape Gentleman (PU – pulled up); 15th Gabbys Cross (UR); Sam Brown (Fell); 17th Dunboyne (PU); 18th Any Second Now (PU); Velvet Elvis (PU); 21st Eva’s Oskar (UR); Delta Work (UR); 24th Mr Incredible (UR); 26th Back On The Lash (PU); 29th Coko Beach (PU); 30th Capodanno (PU)

Thank you for your feedback. A 15-minute delay as were removed from the course left nerves jangling, but Fox was coolness personified as he settled Corach Rambler towards the inside, a few lengths behind the leaders, saving ground and jumping superbly. Animal rights protesters are detained by police after they invaded the course near fence two before the start of the Grand National. Photograph: Tom Jenkins/The Observer Mister Coffey came into the race without a single win over fences to his name, but he jumped and travelled impeccably for Nico de Boinville and led the field for more than a circuit.

  • Yet even as he shot five lengths clear on the turn back towards the stands with two to jump, the eye was irresistibly drawn to the rider in yellow and purple colours, sitting quietly in his slipstream.
  • Corach Rambler was pulling double in second place as they went over the second-last, and jumped into the lead over the last as Mister Coffey’s stamina ran out in a couple of strides.

He faded to finish eighth of the 16 finishers, with Vanillier, Gaillard Du Mesnil and Noble Yeats filling the frame behind the impressive winner. Corach Rambler with Derek Fox on board go clear up the Elbow on their way to to winning the Grand National. Photograph: Tom Jenkins/The Observer Russell’s father, Peter, who played a key role in setting up her current stable in 1995, died in January at the age of 95, while One For Arthur died from colic a few weeks ago, and it was an emotional moment for Russell as the field set off, after the 15-minute delay caused by the protest.

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after newsletter promotion “I spread some of Arthur’s ashes by the winning post just now,” she said afterwards. “He changed my life, and with Corach, it gave me confidence. “It has been really emotional. I felt a bit sorry for Anthony Bromley, who was sitting next to me, because when the tapes went up, I just started crying, which is pathetic. Thomas Kendall (with the trophy) and other owners of Corach Rambler celebrate after winning the Grand National. Photograph: Tom Jenkins/The Observer The seven-strong syndicate that owns Corach Rambler was formed via an advert on Russell’s website and includes Cameron Sword, a 21-year-old student who bought a £3,400 share after developing an interest in racing during lockdown.

Quick Guide Show Huntingdon 1.35 Hardy Boy 2.05 Blue Beach 2.40 Master Malcolm 3.15 Dancila 3.50 The Questioner 4.25 Duke Of Deception 5.00 Borodale 5.35 Hey Brother Wincanton 1.50 Fame And Fun 2.25 Buckhorn Rocco (nap) 3.00 Double Click 3.35 Jack Sprat 4.10 Wick Green (nb) 4.45 Urabamba 5.20 Meatloaf 5.50 Kintail Thank you for your feedback.

Other owners include a Scotsman who retired to Australia and wanted a connection to his home country, and a man who bought in to the horse while searching for a focus after the death of his wife. Corach Rambler is, in other words, a perfect advertisement for the sport, a horse who has changed lives for the better.

“He’s amazing,” Russell said. “He’ll pick up on emotions. I went into his box this morning, I was really scared, not about the test because I knew I’d got the best person riding him, but you’re worried about what might go wrong and scared of the unknown. He’ll turn his head to you and he understands. “Those guys who went out to protest on course, they think it is about horse welfare.

That horse loves his sport, he loves everything he does. He is kept in the best possible conditions, and I am just so delighted that he can run in a race like that, perform like that, and he has now got greatness. It is what he deserves.” : Corach Rambler wins Grand National after protesters force delay to race

Asked By: Carter Washington Date: created: May 24 2024

Who won the Grand National 2023 results today

Answered By: Richard Perez Date: created: May 24 2024

T he 2023 Grand National went the way of Corach Rambler, who backed up his Cheltenham Festival success of last month with a sensational victory.

What happened at the Grand National today?

What happened? – The start of the Grand National was delayed by 14 minutes after animal rights activists entered the track, demonstrating against the staging of the race which was later won by Corach Rambler. Police said they arrested 118 people over Saturday’s disruption, which saw nine people enter the course.

  1. Hill Sixteen died after falling at the first fence of the race, with just 17 of the 39 runners completing Saturday’s race which features 30 fences and just over four miles in length.
  2. The horse’s trainer Sandy Thomson blamed “ignorant” protesters for the death of Hill Sixteen, adding the delay “unsettled” everyone.
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“It was all caused by these so-called animal lovers who are actually ignorant and have absolutely no idea about the welfare of horses,” Thomson told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. The British Horseracing Authority “robustly condemned” the protests, adding it would analyse the races to understand what caused three horse fatalities.

Asked By: Alejandro Rogers Date: created: Jul 18 2023

Where did the horses fall in the national

Answered By: Mason Martin Date: created: Jul 20 2023

Devastating footage shows the moment that a horse that died after participating in the Grand National failed to make a jump. Hill Sixteen died after racing in the Grand National showpiece race and was the third horse to die at this year’s festival. Hill Sixteen fell at the first fence on Saturday evening and suffered what has been described as an “unrecoverable” injury, and was put down.

  1. The 80/1 runner was being ridden by Ryan Mania and was trained by Sandy Thomson.
  2. A Jockey Club spokesperson said: “Sadly, while racing in the Grand National, Hill Sixteen sustained an unrecoverable injury.
  3. Our sincere sympathies are with connections.
  4. Recite A Prayer and Cape Gentleman were assessed on course by our skilled veterinary staff and walked onto the horse ambulance for further assessment in the stables.” Read more: How many horses died or were injured in the 2023 Grand National? Footage shared by animal rights group, Animal Rising, shows the moment the horse failed to make the jump.

In the footage, the horse appears to flip sideways, throwing the jockey forward, before landing limp with stiff legs. Animal Rising described it as “absolutely heart breaking”, they added: “This is what we were trying to stop from happening. Several horses fell during this race. (Image: PA) The moment the horse fell was caught on camera (Image: Animal Rising) The showpiece race was delayed by 15 minutes as animal rights activists gained entry to the racecourse. Sharing footage of the moment the protesters made their way over the fence to their Twitter page, Animal Rising said: “Supporters managed to get onto the track and delay proceedings, making headlines around the world.

  • Subsequently, people all over the UK are having conversations right now about animal rights and our relationship with animals and nature.
  • Our aim was always to start this conversation and we are glad that it is finally happening.” Earlier in the day, one of the group’s spokespeople was arrested, according to Animal Rising.

The group said: “We will no longer be bystanders as beautiful horses like Envoye Special meet their cruel fate in the name of ‘sport.'” Seventeen of the 39 horses who started made it to the finishing line. The death toll at the Aintree Festival has now reached 62 horses since the year 2000.

Corach Rambler wins famous Aintree race Grand National 2023 fallers: Which horses failed to finish Aintree race? Where did my horse finish in the Grand National 2023 at Aintree? The extraordinary story of racehorse owner and construction titan Dai Walters Drinks prices for Grand National at Aintree as pint of Guinness to cost £7.50

Story Saved You can find this story in My Bookmarks. Or by navigating to the user icon in the top right.

Did dream win the Grand National?

Support quality, independent, local journalismthat matters From just £1 a month you can help fund our work – and use our website without adverts. Become a member today Janet Vokes with husband Brian and Dream Alliance Dream Alliance, the horse that won the 2009 Welsh Grand National and whose story inspired a Hollywood film has died at the age of 22. Born and raised on an allotment in Cefn Fforest, the horse was owned by a group of friends in a £10-a-week syndicate led by barmaid Janet Vokes.

The story of Dream Alliance was made into a 2015 documentary called Dark Horse, which in turn led to the production of the 2020 film Dream Horse. After retiring from racing in 2012, the syndicate gave Dream Alliance to Claire Sandercock, who had looked after him during his career at trainer Philip Hobbs’ stable.

Since then he has been looked-after in Somerset. Announcing Dream Alliance’s death on Facebook, Ms Sandercock said: “Many will know and remember Dreamer from his racing days and I know I will never forget the thrill of riding him on the gallops everyday.

  1. I was so so proud of him when he won the Welsh National and I remember telling him afterwards that I didn’t care if he ever won another race again as long as he came home safe and sound.
  2. After he retired from racing the syndicate gifted Dreamer to me and I have owned him for nearly 11 years.
  3. Alongside my mum Debbie we have felt privileged to care, ride and love this very special horse.” She added: “Dreamer has always been a gentle and kind horse but since his retirement from racing his personality has changed so much.

He gained a cheeky sense of humour. He could always tell what you were thinking and if you wanted a quiet plod round the lanes then that is what he gave you, but if you wanted a gallop then he would step it up and be more than up for it. “We will always remember Dreamer not for his achievements on the racecourse but for the gentle and kind horse who looked after and learnt how to school/jump outside of racing together with my mum who had never schooled a horse before; for the horse that taught my sister-in-law how to ride; for the horse that made a nine-year-old girl’s dream come true riding a race horse in a racing saddle; but most of all I will remember Dreamer for being my best friend and always coming over to listen to all my worries.

Were any horses killed at Aintree?

The man who trained the horse that suffered a fatal fall at Saturday’s Grand National has blamed “ignorant” protesters for his animal’s death. The Aintree race had been delayed by almost 15 minutes after protesters attempted to enter the racecourse and fix themselves to the fences and railings along the route.

Hill Sixteen – trained by Sandy Thomson – fell at the first fence and was put down after suffering a broken neck. Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player Grand National protesters breach security fences The Scottish handler described the horse as “hyper” due to the protests, and blamed the activists for why it fell for the first time in his career.

“He just hasn’t taken off at the first fence; he’s got so bloody hyper because of the carry on,” he told the Racing Post. He said he tried to calm the horse by washing him off but to no avail. “Unfortunately, it’s a statistic we’re all trying to avoid,” Mr Thomson said.

  1. He’s jumped round here twice and never had a bother.
  2. I don’t know when he last fell.
  3. I know how ignorant these people are and they haven’t a bloody clue.
  4. They just cause more problems than they ever solve.” Opinion: ‘I loved the Grand National until I saw what I saw’ Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player Grand National protester arrested Horse deaths ‘unavoidable’ in racing Animal Rising – which spearheaded Saturday’s protest – told Sky News its actions at the Grand National “aimed to prevent exactly that from happening”.

The group said: “Firstly, we want to offer our deepest condolences to anyone connected to Hill Sixteen or who has been impacted by their death. Animal Rising’s actions at the Grand National aimed to prevent exactly that from happening. “Horse deaths and injuries are an unavoidable consequence of the way we use animals for sport, not dissimilar to the way we cause billions of animal deaths in our food system.

“The only way to prevent more harm from coming to these beautiful creatures is by completely re-evaluating our connection to them and finding a way of loving them that doesn’t put them in harm’s way. “We’d welcome dialogue with Sandy Thomson or Jimmy Fyffe about how to move forwards together and really transform our relationship to horses and, indeed, to all animals and nature.” Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player Jockey Club chief executive: ‘You will never eliminate risk completely’ However the head of the Jockey Club, which owns Aintree racecourse, told Sky News “you will never eliminate risk completely” from the sport.

Nevin Truesdale said: “We can’t ignore what happened in terms of the fatalities we saw and every fatality in racing is one too many.” Mr Truesdale said that “99.8% of horses across all of racing come back from their races safely”, adding that the fatality rate had fallen by a third over the past decade. Image: Police officers respond to Animal Rising activists attempting to invade the race course Three horses die at Aintree Hill Sixteen was the third racehorse to die during the Grand National meeting, watched by 70,000-strong crowds. Dark Raven died earlier in the day and Envoye Special died on Thursday, the first day of the three-day festival.

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The British Horseracing Authority (BHA) has since said it will “analyse” the races “in painstaking detail” following the deaths. “The BHA and Aintree racecourse will now analyse the races in painstaking detail, as is the case every year, to build on our existing data and help us understand what caused these incidents,” BHA chief executive Julie Harrington said.

Read more: British Horseracing Authority to ‘analyse’ Grand National ‘in painstaking detail’ Roly Owers, the chief executive of charity World Horse Welfare, called it a “very sad day”. He said: “From Aintree to television screens across the world, this year’s meet was difficult to watch. “Whilst it is true that accidents can happen anywhere – and the risks can never be removed altogether – jump racing poses specific risks that it has a responsibility to relentlessly reduce wherever possible. “It is clear to us that despite the changes made by Aintree and racing to date, much more needs to be done.”

Who is the only woman to win the Grand National?

RACHAEL BLACKMORE REWRITES THE HISTORY BOOKS – Rachael Blackmore rewrote the history books yet again to become the first female jockey to win the Randox Grand National as she and Minella Times gave owner JP McManus a second win in the iconic race. Minella Times had been backed into 11-1 for the world’s greatest steeplechase after Blackmore rode six winners at last month’s Cheltenham Festival to win the leading jockey award.

Asked By: Bryan Ross Date: created: Nov 03 2023

Which jockey was injured in the Grand National

Answered By: Fred Baker Date: created: Nov 05 2023

Johnny Burke faces a spell on the sidelines after suffering a broken arm during Saturday’s Grand National at Aintree. The Cork jockey suffered the injury after parting company with his mount Sam Brown at the 15th fence in the marathon contest. He was taken to hospital immediately after the race where it was confirmed that he had broken his lower arm.

READ MORE: Johnny Burke suffers broken arm injury after nasty fall in the Grand National But the popular rider, who is also a keen race caller, managed to pose for a selfie in A&E with his partner Frankie Rowles on Saturday night. Sharing a photo with Burke on Twitter, she wrote: “Thank you for all your lovely messages about J.

A broken arm and a few scrapes to the face. Yes I was a little over-dressed for a Saturday night in A&E.” Burke’s injury comes just weeks after his father Liam became the oldest winning jockey in 100 years when he guided Teuchters Glory to victory in a bumper at Limerick.

  • Well wishes have been pouring in on social media for Burke since news emerged of the injury.
  • Galway racecourse wrote: “Great news.
  • Sending our best from the team in Galway.” Someone else added: “All the best to him, hope he makes a swift recovery.” Another comment read: “Pleased to see you’re ok Johnny.

Hope the broken arm fixes up quick and strong for you dude. Had me worried yesterday!!” READ NEXT:

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How do you pick a winning horse?

HOW TO PICK THE WINNING HORSE We know a lot of you racegoers out there tend to pick the horse with the most stylish or funniest name, or even the colour of the jockey’s silks. However, there are other much more credible strategies out there that can help you make a more informed decision with your bets.

  1. Here are some of the main attributes to consider when looking for a winner on race day.
  2. THE RACEHORSE ITSELF It’s a good idea to look at various factors relating to the racehorse before choosing it.
  3. Ask yourself questions such as: Has he/she run well previously at today’s distance? – a good winning percentage at today’s distance is a huge tick in the box.

Does he/she handle this track/racing surface? – Some horses can only show their best on better ground, while others love a test in the mud. Check whether this horse can handle turf, dirt, synthetic etc. What’s my horse’s post position like? – sprint races around one turn usually favour outside posts, whilst route races, which include two or more turns, at longer distances often favour inside post positions.

What about the distances? – front runners that are shortening up in distance and closers that are stretching out are factors to pay attention to. One of the more obvious factors, looking into the distances is an essential part of deducing winners. On both the flat and over obstacles, most horses will tend to have a limit to how far they can go before their stamina gives out.

Choosing a horse with proven stamina can be hugely beneficial, especially when the ground is testing. THE TRAINERS It is worth examining the trainers and jockeys before placing your bets. Generally speaking, trainers that win tend to continue winning, and vice versa. Also, if the trainer has multiple horses entered, it looks like they are really trying to bag a win. takes time for a jockey to get a feel for the horse, especially its behaviour and characteristics on and off the track. Look for horses where a jockey has already made its first ride. It doesn’t matter if it lost (which is most likely anyway) – they’ll be back with a vengeance and will want to try even harder the second time to bag a win.

  • And, of course, certain jockeys fit better with certain racehorses – keep an eye out for horses who are previous race winners.
  • If the same jockey is riding that horse, chances are high for a win.
  • THE FAVOURITE It’s true that voting on the underdogs of the race is a favourable move, especially when it means that the winnings will flood in.

While those who won the last race or are the favourite won’t always win, it has higher chances of paying off. The race favourite tends to pull through 33% of the time. Betting on the favourite to be in 1st or 2nd pays off around 53% of the time, or if you’re looking at 3rd also, this pays off approximately 67% of the time. Without doubt, you should definitely consider the race card and its form and features when picking a winner. First, the features. When looking at a horse’s profile, it is handy looking at the letters on the race card. The Course is represented by the letter C, and D represents distance, both of which help to identify those horses that have won at that course before or over that distance.

  • CD’ denotes a horse who has won over both the course and distance of the race under consideration.
  • Other notable letters are F, representing a horse who has fallen, U, a rider who has been unseated respectively and S, meaning a horse has slipped up.
  • Additionally, the form numbers on a race card represent the finishing position of a horse in its most recent races.
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Numbers alone can be misleading, though, as a horse could have a ‘3′ in its form, but that third-placed finish could have come in a three-runner race. Consider the context of the form before making any rash decisions! For more, read about how to read a race card here.

THE PADDOCK Although, the racehorse itself has been mentioned, one should also highlight the importance of the paddock. A runner’s physical wellbeing, fitness and temperament can be assessed by watching them parading in the paddock before a race. If a horse is sweating or appears agitated, this is generally a bad sign.

Yet, a horse who handles the preliminaries well will give itself a better chance of performing to the best of its ability. It does seem a little overwhelming with the variety of factors needed to be considered when selecting your race day winner. Horse race betting is certainly not easy, however a punter who is wise to all of the factors explained will have a greater chance of picking a winner the those who don’t. Do you like what you’ve read here? Sign up to our newsletter and be the first to hear about more sports news and blog posts, competitions and special offers from Keith Prowse hospitality.

What happened to the horses in the Grand National today?

The man who trained the horse that suffered a fatal fall at Saturday’s Grand National has blamed “ignorant” protesters for his animal’s death. The Aintree race had been delayed by almost 15 minutes after protesters attempted to enter the racecourse and fix themselves to the fences and railings along the route.

Hill Sixteen – trained by Sandy Thomson – fell at the first fence and was put down after suffering a broken neck. Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player Grand National protesters breach security fences The Scottish handler described the horse as “hyper” due to the protests, and blamed the activists for why it fell for the first time in his career.

“He just hasn’t taken off at the first fence; he’s got so bloody hyper because of the carry on,” he told the Racing Post. He said he tried to calm the horse by washing him off but to no avail. “Unfortunately, it’s a statistic we’re all trying to avoid,” Mr Thomson said.

  1. He’s jumped round here twice and never had a bother.
  2. I don’t know when he last fell.
  3. I know how ignorant these people are and they haven’t a bloody clue.
  4. They just cause more problems than they ever solve.” Opinion: ‘I loved the Grand National until I saw what I saw’ Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player Grand National protester arrested Horse deaths ‘unavoidable’ in racing Animal Rising – which spearheaded Saturday’s protest – told Sky News its actions at the Grand National “aimed to prevent exactly that from happening”.

The group said: “Firstly, we want to offer our deepest condolences to anyone connected to Hill Sixteen or who has been impacted by their death. Animal Rising’s actions at the Grand National aimed to prevent exactly that from happening. “Horse deaths and injuries are an unavoidable consequence of the way we use animals for sport, not dissimilar to the way we cause billions of animal deaths in our food system.

The only way to prevent more harm from coming to these beautiful creatures is by completely re-evaluating our connection to them and finding a way of loving them that doesn’t put them in harm’s way. “We’d welcome dialogue with Sandy Thomson or Jimmy Fyffe about how to move forwards together and really transform our relationship to horses and, indeed, to all animals and nature.” Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player Jockey Club chief executive: ‘You will never eliminate risk completely’ However the head of the Jockey Club, which owns Aintree racecourse, told Sky News “you will never eliminate risk completely” from the sport.

Nevin Truesdale said: “We can’t ignore what happened in terms of the fatalities we saw and every fatality in racing is one too many.” Mr Truesdale said that “99.8% of horses across all of racing come back from their races safely”, adding that the fatality rate had fallen by a third over the past decade. Image: Police officers respond to Animal Rising activists attempting to invade the race course Three horses die at Aintree Hill Sixteen was the third racehorse to die during the Grand National meeting, watched by 70,000-strong crowds. Dark Raven died earlier in the day and Envoye Special died on Thursday, the first day of the three-day festival.

  • The British Horseracing Authority (BHA) has since said it will “analyse” the races “in painstaking detail” following the deaths.
  • The BHA and Aintree racecourse will now analyse the races in painstaking detail, as is the case every year, to build on our existing data and help us understand what caused these incidents,” BHA chief executive Julie Harrington said.

Read more: British Horseracing Authority to ‘analyse’ Grand National ‘in painstaking detail’ Roly Owers, the chief executive of charity World Horse Welfare, called it a “very sad day”. He said: “From Aintree to television screens across the world, this year’s meet was difficult to watch. “Whilst it is true that accidents can happen anywhere – and the risks can never be removed altogether – jump racing poses specific risks that it has a responsibility to relentlessly reduce wherever possible. “It is clear to us that despite the changes made by Aintree and racing to date, much more needs to be done.”

Asked By: Oswald Howard Date: created: May 03 2024

Who came 6th and 7th in Grand National

Answered By: Carl Wilson Date: created: May 05 2024

Grand National 2022 finishers

Position Horse SP
4 Santini 33/1
5 Fiddlerontheroof 12/1
6 Longhouse Poet 12/1
7 Freewheelin Dylan 50/1

What happened at the Grand National today?

What happened? – The start of the Grand National was delayed by 14 minutes after animal rights activists entered the track, demonstrating against the staging of the race which was later won by Corach Rambler. Police said they arrested 118 people over Saturday’s disruption, which saw nine people enter the course.

  • Hill Sixteen died after falling at the first fence of the race, with just 17 of the 39 runners completing Saturday’s race which features 30 fences and just over four miles in length.
  • The horse’s trainer Sandy Thomson blamed “ignorant” protesters for the death of Hill Sixteen, adding the delay “unsettled” everyone.

“It was all caused by these so-called animal lovers who are actually ignorant and have absolutely no idea about the welfare of horses,” Thomson told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. The British Horseracing Authority “robustly condemned” the protests, adding it would analyse the races to understand what caused three horse fatalities.