Asked By: Edward Ward Date: created: Jul 13 2023

Why is Liverpool’s motto You’ll never walk alone

Answered By: Reginald Cox Date: created: Jul 15 2023

So much more than a song – Following the Hillsborough disaster in 1989 Liverpool’s club anthem took on a whole new significance. It has become the soundtrack of hope for the club, its fans and for the City of Liverpool through extremely tough times. It signified Liverpool’s fight for justice for their fans and it lets the families and friends of those who were lost at Hillsborough know that they will never be alone.

Today it is the most iconic supporters’ anthem in the game. It is belted out at Anfield before every single game in an iconic and symbolic spectacle. Fans of many other teams (most notably Celtic and Borussia Dortmund) also sing ‘You’ll Never Walk Alone’ but this anthem will always truly belong to Liverpool Football Club.

Thanks in part to an appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show in New York City way back in 1964. : Ever Wonder Why ‘You’ll Never Walk Alone’ became Liverpool’s iconic club anthem?

Asked By: Chase Thomas Date: created: Mar 20 2023

Who did the most famous version of You’ll never walk alone

Answered By: Antonio Wright Date: created: Mar 23 2023

Five lump-in-throat renditions of You’ll Never Walk Alone You’ll Never Walk Alone first appeared in the Rodgers & Hammerstein musical ‘Carousel’ in 1945. This operatic version was much more about personal inspiration in the film, but the original take has long been surpassed as an anthemic song of solidarity by football clubs.

Most notably, of course, by the fans of Liverpool FC, whose long walk to justice for the 96 killed in the came a little closer with Frank Sinatra was the first person to take the song into the charts, with his version peaking at #9 on the Billboard charts in 1945, but it was the Gerry & The Pacemakers version that took off as the definitive Mersey anthem.

One such rumour, before a match would start, the DJ at Liverpool’s Anfield Stadium would play the top ten in order, with the number one of the time playing last, right before kick off. The fans took to singing it even after the song dropped from the top ten, and it has stuck since.

  • The rousing song has become a post-tragedy anthem, and has been sung by everybody from AC Milan fans in solidarity with the Liverpool supporters that lost their lives at Hillsborough to an all-American rendition by Alicia Keys in tribute to the lives lost in Hurricane Katrina.
  • Here are five lump-in-throat renditions of the song over the years
  • 1. You’ll Never Walk Alone With Lyrics

2. AC Milan fans singing in tribute to the Liverpool supporters that lost their lives at Hillsborough. European Champions Cup Semi-Final, 19/04/1989

  1. 3. LFC -TV: Gerry Marsden sings “You’ll Never Walk Alone” – Hillsborough 20-yr Memorial Service
  2. 4. Liverpool fans – You’ll never walk alone
  3. 5. Alicia Keys in tribute to the lives lost in Hurricane Katrina

: Five lump-in-throat renditions of You’ll Never Walk Alone

What is the story behind you’ll never walk alone?

What other teams sing ‘You’ll Never Walk Alone’? – The song was later adopted by Celtic after a 1966 Cup Winners Cup semi-final against Liverpool at Anfield. It is now sung by Celtic fans before every home European game. It has also been adopted by Dutch team FC Twente, after it was officially given to them by former Anfield stadiumspeaker George Septhon during the last game in the Diekman stadium.

Asked By: Seth Hayes Date: created: Oct 30 2023

When did Liverpool start using you’ll never walk alone

Answered By: Sebastian Rivera Date: created: Nov 01 2023

How ‘You’ll Never Walk Alone’ became Liverpool Football Club’s anthem – At that time, Liverpool’s Anfield Stadium was one of the first football grounds to have a PA system, and the Top 10 in the charts would be played over the speakers before the match as a form of early pre-match entertainment.

This was also the time when ‘Merseybeat’ bands like The Beatles and Gerry And The Pacemakers dominated the charts, so the fans would have heard a lot of their local heroes over the tannoy. ‘You’ll Never Walk Alone’ stayed at No.1 in the charts for about four weeks in 1963, by which time it had become Liverpool FC’s signature tune.

The message of hope in the song has given the fans of Liverpool hope through some very tough times – both on and off the field. In the finals of the 2005 UEFA Champions League Final in Istanbul, Liverpool were losing 3-0 to AC Milan. Legend has it that the motivating effect of the fans singing You’ll Never Walk Alone gave the players hope when all seemed lost.

This small act of defiance in the face of adversity galvanised the Liverpool team, and they managed to pull back and win the match on penalties, crowning them European Cup Champions. Later, Carlo Ancelotti, then coach of AC Milan was asked which club had the best fans. He responded, “In my opinion Liverpool fans.

When they sing a song they. I don’t know in English, but your skin is.,” Read more: The best classical football songs You’ll Never Walk Alone – Liverpool FC. Picture: Getty The song took on a much deeper and more tragic meaning after the Hillsborough disaster of 1989, when a human crush at the stadium in Sheffield injured hundreds and 96 fans lost their lives. There followed a 25 year legal battle before the courts ruled that the victims were unlawfully killed and that a catalogue of failings by police and the ambulance services contributed to their deaths.

Throughout the painful process, the lyrics and themes of You’ll Never Walk Alone were prominent. On the day after the tragedy at Hillsborough, 13,000 people gathered at Liverpool’s Roman Catholic Cathedral; 5,000 in the church, and a further 8,000 spilling into the streets outside. ‘You’ll Never Walk Alone’ was sung by a lone choir boy, offering both comfort and hope to a city in mourning,

Read more: Music in protest: 9 powerful images of music’s role in times of conflict You’ll Never Walk Alone. Picture: Getty

Did the Beatles wrote You’ll never walk alone?

The song was written by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II for their 1945 musical Carousel. It is sung twice during the show, the second time in the climactic graduation scene, when Louise realises that she does not have to live as an outcast.

Asked By: Lucas Stewart Date: created: Jun 30 2023

Did Celtic copy Liverpool with you’ll never walk alone

Answered By: Hugh Parker Date: created: Jul 02 2023

Why do Celtic Fans Sing “You’ll Never Walk Alone”? – Though some debate they beat Liverpool to the punch here, it’s widely accepted that the supporters of the Glasgow giants adopted the anthem themselves after playing Liverpool at Anfield in the 1966 European Cup Winners’ Cup semi-finals.

  1. These days, it’s still belted out at Parkhead before kick-off, especially on European nights.
  2. There’s also a school of thought that Celtic took the song later than this.
  3. In the 1970s, Celtic and Liverpool met in a number of friendlies and testimonial matches for the likes of Ron Yeats, Tommy Burns and Billy McNeill.

It is then, some say, that Celtic fans started singing YNWA, albeit intermittently until the Hillsborough Memorial Match in 1989, after which it began to become more commonplace on the Parkhead terraces.

Why did Pink Floyd use Liverpool chant?

Liverpool FC: the Pink Floyd connection For many Scousers, it combines two of the most beloved passions in a Liverpudlian’s way of life – rock music and Liverpool Football Club, yet the connection behind Pink Floyd’s 1971 track with the Kop’s famous support has never officially been clarified by the original progressive rockers.

  1. Many interpretations have been offered and, in most cases, dismissed as propaganda.
  2. Depending on one’s allegiance with regards to music and sport, this could well be another tossed onto that particular scrapheap.
  3. For those unfamiliar with the song, it’s a slow, mellow, psychedelic number from the band’s sixth studio album Meddle and first features a recording of Liverpool fans chanting ‘ You’ll Never Walk Alone ‘ after around 30 seconds from its start.

The recording proceeds to fade in and out throughout the six-minute duration of the song and is then accountable for the track’s spine-chilling climax. Yet the usage of Liverpool FC’s signature anthem has baffled Pink Floyd fans for many years, particularly those who follow Arsenal, a football club the band’s co-founder Roger Waters has supported since childhood.

  1. Waters also co-wrote Fearless and, as the band’s undisputed leader throughout their 1970s heyday, it is he who is believed to have advocated the idea of sampling the Kop’s voice.
  2. In part due to his father’s death whilst serving in the British Army, Waters has always been a pacifist but, essentially, a socialist.

Although born in Surrey, he was raised in Cambridge and at the age of just 15 became chairman of their local division of the anti-nuclear weapons organisation CND – The Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (whose symbol would later become universally recognised as a sign for peace).

  1. It was the first major step in a life dedicated to activism before, during and after Pink Floyd.
  2. From writing an opera influenced by the early stages of the French Revolution, to playing benefit gigs in aid of poverty, Waters has habitually applied his musical talents to what he believes in.
  3. One muted theory is that it was his admiration for the people of Liverpool city for their notorious left-wing allegiance that inspired him to blend the sound of them singing on the Spion Kop with his band’s experimental music, regardless of his affiliation to Arsenal.

Everton fans need not take offence, for they are as much responsible for the city’s socialist reputation, but ‘ The People’s Club ‘ perhaps lacked a trademark terrace chant parallel to the magnitude of ‘ You’ll Never Walk Alone ‘ to be considered by Waters.

  • In this sense, Fearless has little to do with Liverpool FC as such and the presence of the Rodgers and Hammerstein rendition is, rather, a tribute to the socialist people of the city, whether they follow the team or not.
  • Even Floyd’s lyrics depict elements of socialism: “You say the hill’s too steep to climb/you say you’d like to see me try climbing/You pick the place and I’ll choose the time/And I’ll climb”.
  • Here, the opening lines of Fearless reflect the resistance to authority and never-say-die attitude of Liverpudlian activists of past and present.
  • In the 1930s, the Spanish Civil War contributed to polarising opinion in Liverpool, but the socialist gene remains in a proportion of today’s Liverpool fans, who have been known to flutter a flag in honour of Spaniard goalkeeper Pepe Reina which reads ” No Pasarán “, a slogan originally used by Republicans during Spain’s conflict and later assumed by left-wing organisations worldwide.
  • Of course, not everyone and everything connected to Liverpool FC and the city itself is socialist – it would be stereotyping and ignorant to suggest as much – but it will take a hell of a lot more than the recent negative press surrounding the football club to eradicate the years of graft that formed this general perception.
  • During Floyd’s best years in the 1970s, a certain Bill Shankly was busy placing another very large brick in the wall of Anfield’s history and, although he’s a Scotsman, it seems fitting to close on a quote of his that no doubt every Liverpool fan will know

“The socialism I believe in is not really politics. It is a way of living. It is humanity. I believe the only way to live and to be truly successful is by collective effort, with everyone working for each other, everyone helping each other, and everyone having a share of the rewards at the end of the day. That might be asking a lot, but it’s the way I see football and the way I see life.”

  1. I’m sure Roger Waters approved.
  2. By Jamie Casey
  3. This article originally appeared in

: Liverpool FC: the Pink Floyd connection

Did Liverpool sing You’ll never walk alone for Ukraine?

Liverpool and Ukraine unite for emotional You’ll Never Walk Alone performance

Former Eurovision contestants in and joined together for an emotional performance of You’ll Never Walk Alone that brought audience members to tears.The final act of the grand final before the vote closed was The Liverpool Songbook – a celebration of the host city’s contribution to the world of pop music.Mahmood, from, began by singing John Lennon’s Imagine accompanied with an orchestra, before Israel’s descended from the ceiling singing to Dead Or Alive’s You Spin Me Round (Like A Record).Known for her quirky style, Netta landed on the stage from atop a silver bird before large silver wings inflated from the back of her costume and spread out behind her.Iceland’s Dadi Freyr performed Atomic Kitten’s hit Whole Again, with backing dancers wearing jumpers featuring his face and the audience singing along.Cornelia Jakobs sat on a chair with her feet in water to perform I Turn To You by Spice Girl Mel C.Merseyside’s own Sonia, who competed in Eurovision in 1993, entertained with a rendition of her entry Better The Devil You Know after clips of her time in the competition were shown on the big screen.Dutch singer Duncan Laurence then performed Liverpool FC anthem You’ll Never Walk Alone as the crowd waved flags in the air.He was joined on stage by hosts and performers, while Ukrainian winner Ruslana was shown on the steps of the Golden Gate in Kyiv singing along, joined by people waving the country’s national flag.

An audience member was shown in tears as the emotional performance concluded and host said: “A tear in my silly old eye. You don’t see that every day.” : Liverpool and Ukraine unite for emotional You’ll Never Walk Alone performance

What is Liverpool’s motto in Latin?

The coat of arms – 1892 – The very first club crest was the city of Liverpool’s coat of arms, depicting the Liverbird and Neptune, the Roman god of freshwater and the sea, and Triton, the Greek god and messenger of the sea. It also includes the Latin phrase, Deus Nobis Haec Otia Fecit, the motto of Liverpool, and commonly translated means, ‘God hath granted us this ease’.

Asked By: Graham Foster Date: created: Apr 05 2023

Who had a hit in 1985 with You’ll Never Walk Alone

Answered By: Isaac Jackson Date: created: Apr 06 2023

‘You’ll Never Walk Alone’: From Broadway Tear-Jerker to Covid-Era Anthem (Published 2020) Versions of the “Carousel” song by Aretha Franklin, Gerry and the Pacemakers and Liverpool F.C. fans have turned it into something universal. The many forms of a show tune, from left: a Liverpool F.C. fan, Aretha Franklin and Shirley Jones with Gordon MacRae in the film “Carousel.” Credit.20th Century Fox; Neon, via Associated Press; Chris Hyde/Getty Images “Walk on, walk on/With hope in your heart/And you’ll never walk alone.” Many Americans know “You’ll Never Walk Alone” as the emotional peak of Act II in the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical “Carousel.” But in the 75 years since the number was first heard on Broadway, it has blossomed into a global anthem that strikes a strong chord during tough times.

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In recent weeks, it has come to embody the resilience, solidarity and need for promise required in the battle against the coronavirus — and suddenly, it seems everywhere, including a brief moment at the top of the British singles chart. Here are a few steps in the song’s evolution. This clip from the 1956 Hollywood adaptation helps set up the song in the musical’s story line: The violent Billy Bigelow (Gordon MacRae) has died and his wife, Julie (Shirley Jones), is consoled by her cousin Nettie Fowler (Claramae Turner), who sings of succor and hope.

“Carousel” opened on Broadway on April 19, 1945, and recorded a string-heavy, shortly after. Covers have been pouring out since. You may have heard of this other Liverpool hit machine managed by Brian Epstein and produced by George Martin in the early 1960s — that’s not surprising, since Gerry and the Pacemakers’ first three singles all topped the British charts.

  • Their third No.1 was “You’ll Never Walk Alone,” performed in 1963 with a gentle pop lilt rather than the original’s operatic grandeur.
  • In 1985, the frontman Gerry Marsden took the song to No.1 again with, a supergroup convened to raise funds in the aftermath of the Bradford City stadium fire, which killed 56 people at a soccer match.

“You’ll Never Walk Alone” is such a part of Liverpool F.C. that the title is on the soccer club’s and engraved atop Anfield stadium’s Shankly Gates. Almost immediately after Gerry and the Pacemakers turned it into a hit, the team’s supporters embraced the song as their anthem.

Britain has a long, proud tradition of full-throated fans enlivening matches with chants, but few have the goosebump-triggering power of “You’ll Never Walk Alone” rising out of a sea of red shirts. (The last minute of Pink Floyd’s mellow off the band’s 1971 album “Meddle,” also integrates the sound of Liverpool fans singing “You’ll Never Walk Alone.”) In 1964, the French singer Richard Anthony (real name: Ricardo Anthony Btesh) came out with a translation that took some liberties with the original, as most adaptations at the time were wont.

Suddenly, “You’ll Never Walk Alone” was a forlorn breakup ballad: “Only you, always you, I love you” and so on. To cover more of the European market, Anthony also recorded versions in and, On their second album, “Boom,” the garage-punk band the Sonics led their own “Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark” with a quote from the Rodgers and Hammerstein tune.

While “You’ll Never Walk Alone” is meant to be reassuring, the singer Gerry Roslie quickly morphs into the slightly menacing character you’d expect fronting a band whose signature songs were “Psycho” and “Strychnine.” Drum and bugle corps have always built their repertoire out of a mix of contemporary hits, show tunes and classical pieces, but few have been identified with a song for as long as the : “You’ll Never Walk Alone” has been part of this Wisconsin ensemble’s repertoire since the mid-1950s.

Never underestimate the power of a large horn line gradually amping up until it can blow the hat off your head. For decades, Jerry Lewis concluded his annual telethon to raise funds for the Muscular Dystrophy Association by singing you-know-what. But this did not lessen the emotional impact for him, as you can see from this 2010 video, in which he performed “You’ll Never Walk Alone” for what he said was the 59th — and, unbeknown to him, the last — time.

(Since his first telethon was in 1966, this means his association with the song went back even earlier.) Aretha Franklin brought out the song’s spirituality on her best-selling gospel album “Amazing Grace,” recorded live with James Cleveland and the Southern California Community Choir in 1972. (A was finally unveiled in late 2018.) The track starts simply enough, with just Franklin and a piano.

The band and choir come in around the four-minute mark, yet they don’t unleash their full power, and the song keeps simmering. The controlled intensity is maybe even more effective than a raise-the-roof escalation. Of course, escalation is great, too. Patti LaBelle and the Blue Belles recorded “You’ll Never Walk Alone” in 1962, and a from the Apollo has a casual amble — though that seemingly tossed-off final note reminds everybody who’s boss — sustained by the era’s trademark punchy soul arrangements.

But it’s another Apollo performance that brings the audience to its feet, or perhaps knees. Everything is turned to 11 in 1985: the towering crest, the amped-up gospel choir, the electric delivery, the fake ending two-thirds of the way through followed by LaBelle taking everybody back to church. Hit that replay button one more time.

In April, “You’ll Never Walk Alone” topped the British singles chart again, helmed — we’ve come full circle — by a musical-theater performer. Exerting maximum pressure on the lacrimal glands, the track combines the voices of Michael Ball (“Les Misérables,” “Phantom of the Opera”); Thomas Moore, a.k.a.

(a 100-year-old World War II veteran who raised millions of pounds for charity by walking around his garden); and the NHS Voices of Care Choir. This cover somewhat eclipsed concurrent ones by the Mumford & Sons frontman and by, There is a very good chance you will tear up at this viral video of a Dutch hospital’s paramedics, nurses and doctors singing to each other through a glass door.

Slicker, and perhaps a little bit more self-serving is a, which edits together pictures of essential workers and footage of her performing “You’ll Never Walk Alone” in tribute to the Sept.11 victims at the end of the 2001 Emmy Awards. More upbeat is the, recorded “for the brave who care for the sick, for everyone who stays at home to save others.

Who sang you’ll never walk alone in the 50s?

Legacy – Hamilton was inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame in 2010. Hamilton was Epic Records ‘ first star, giving the company its first number-one hit of any kind, “You’ll Never Walk Alone”, which topped the Billboard R&B chart for eight weeks in 1954.

A year later, he gave the label its second number-one hit of any kind when his version of “Unchained Melody” topped the Billboard R&B chart for three weeks. Also, with “Unchained Melody”, Hamilton became the first solo artist to deliver a top-ten pop hit for Epic. Hamilton was the singer who inspired Sam Cooke, then a gospel music star, to switch over to secular music,

Hamilton was also the one to whom Cooke first submitted his early pop-song compositions. Hamilton’s distinctive sound was a big influence on Elvis Presley’s ballad singing. As author Fred L. Worth noted, “Elvis greatly admired Hamilton’s singing ability and style and performed a number of his ballads in Hamilton’s style.” Also, The Righteous Brothers emulated Hamilton’s style to create their blue-eyed soul sound.

This is particularly evident in the duo’s cover versions of his hits “You’ll Never Walk Alone”, “Ebb Tide” and “Unchained Melody”. Hamilton’s “You’ll Never Walk Alone” disc was brought in from the US by a sailor friend of Gerry and the Pacemakers leader Gerry Marsden, As a result, the band recorded a UK version of the song which became the anthem for Liverpool Football Club, sung by the crowd before every home game.

The sailor friend noted that Marsden “puts very similar inflections into the song, trying to get it very similar to Roy Hamilton’s version.”

Asked By: Lewis Lewis Date: created: Mar 03 2024

What film was you’ll never walk alone made for

Answered By: Blake Harris Date: created: Mar 04 2024

Carousel (1956) – (Movie Clip) You’ll Never Walk Alone Upon the death (accidental, in this movie version) of her betrothed, Julie (Shirley Jones) comforted by Cousin Nettie (Claramae Turner), with the song best known today as the anthem of Liverpool Football Club (as performed by Gerry And The Pacemakers), from Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Carousel, 1956.

Asked By: Miles White Date: created: Feb 09 2024

What is the quote you will never walk alone

Answered By: Dennis Young Date: created: Feb 09 2024

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Opinion Column

Published Jan 14, 2021 • Last updated Jan 14, 2021 • 3 minute read Mention the name Gerry Marsden and I’m sure most of us would ask, who is he? This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below. Play the iconic song ‘You’ll Never Walk Alone,’ the official anthem of the Liverpool Football Club in England, and a song that’s been sung by a whole variety of famous people throughout the years, and the answer to that question may become more obvious.

Got it? That’s right, it was Gerry, a Liverpudlian, and his group, Gerry and the Pacemakers, who made the song one of the greatest hits of all times. Well Gerry passed away on Sunday, Jan.3 at age 78. It so happened that in my last article I happened to say that I often listen to this song online, and I’ve been listening to it even more as we make our journey together through these unique days of the COVID era.

I’m not the only one. Tom Eames of Smooth Radio said in June of last year that the song has “returned to the public consciousness in recent weeks during the coronavirus pandemic, due to its uplifting message.” This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

  • How true! Listen to that first verse.
  • When you walk through a storm hold your head up high, and don’t be afraid of the dark, at the end of the storm there’s a golden sky, and the sweet silver song of the lark.
  • Walk on through the wind, walk on through the rain, though your dreams be tossed and blown, walk on, walk on, with hope in your heart, and you’ll never walk alone, you’ll never walk alone.” Indeed, those words when you hear them being sung can lift the weary soul up out of the gloom of contemporary despair.

This morning as I’m writing these words I’ve been listening to 95,000 soccer fans, in a sea of red scarfs in Melbourne, Australia, singing it. They literally raise the roof. Add to that the virtual choir and orchestra comprised of 300 people from 15 different countries giving their inspiring rendition, and then the Andre Rieu version, and by the time you finish those three, I guarantee your spirits will be soaring! This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below.

Just about everyone under the sun has sung the classic song including Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, Dionne Warwick, Josh Groban, Aretha Franklin, Barbara Streisand, Olivia Newton-John, and Roy Orbison, to name a mere few. The song was written about 75 years ago for the Rodgers and Hammerstein Broadway musical ‘Carousel.’ Young Gerry Marsden had seen the musical when he was growing up as a kid, and in 1959 as an aspiring singer and musician he formed the group ‘Gerry and the Pacemakers.’ Some years later in 1964 Gerry and the group took the Carousel musical song, and the rest is history.

By the mid-60s soccer fans were singing it at every Liverpool soccer game. It became the football club’s signature tune, and has been now for more than half-a-century. It’s no wonder that the lyrics of this iconic song have been sung by many worldwide in these contemporary days.

This advertisement has not loaded yet, but your article continues below. As we’ve turned into the new year 2021, the pandemic is still with us, and for many, fear is escalating, and hope is diminishing. If ever there was a moment when hope needs to fill all our hearts, this is the moment! Gerry’s song is truly a song for our times – “Walk on, walk on with hope in your heart, and you’ll never walk alone.” It was Jesus Himself who nearing the end of His ministry, left these words with His disciples, “Surely, I am with you always, to the end of the age.” (The Bible, Matthew 28:20, NIV) That is the wonderful truth of the Christian gospel, that when we walk with God, and live for Him, there is the iron clad guarantee of His presence with us in every challenging situation of our lives.

When we walk through a storm, we need not be afraid, but we can have hope, and hold our head up high and look to Him, for He will see us through to the very end! Thank you Gerry! You will never be forgotten. Neither will your song.

What does don’t be afraid to walk alone mean?

It’s been a funny few weeks – I won’t go into too many details but let’s just say a few things have happened lately that have really forced me to step up and act like an adult. It’s pretty easy when travelling to feel like you’re 18 and invincible, that nothing can touch you and that somehow you’re just evading all the bad things in life.

  1. Often you’re just so overwhelmed by the goodness and kindness of people that you wonder if you had them all wrong when you were back home working that 9-5 job and getting stressed out constantly by the behaviour of others.
  2. I’m not going to deny that bad things ever happen when you’re travelling, but to be honest they don’t very often – at least nowhere near as often as people warn you that they do.

But when they do, it’s a shock, it brings you back down to earth with a bump after months of soaring along with your head in the clouds. Don’t worry, everyone, including myself are okay – if anything, I’m being a bit dramatic. Why? Well it all goes back to a conversation I had the other week with a friend about the situation, something she said really struck me and made me think.

When asked about life back at home, I told her that I don’t really get homesick – yes I miss the people, the moments and the history, but I don’t think I have once spent a day pining for home. I know some find homesickness a real problem when travelling and I’ve had friends who can be down for days on end if something sets off those feelings, but that’s just not me.

I was never homesick when I went to university either, I think I’m just used to dealing with the feeling of being separate and I’m a very logical person who will always reason with herself that family and friends are always at the end of the phone. My friend, who does get homesick and has been missing home lately, commented on how independent I was and seemed surprised by it.

  • Especially when she realised that I had travelled so far across the world by myself and was unafraid to tackle Asia and Australia solo.
  • I’ve had this reaction multiple times since planning my travels and setting out – it’s something that just seems odd to me and perhaps highlights that it is still thought of as unusual for a young woman to be “brave” enough to be on her own and to be completely independent.

Don’t worry – I’m not going to start quoting Beyoncé songs to you, but I do want to make the point that I think it is a huge compliment to say that someone is so very independent. Independence is vastly underrated – whether is financial, emotional, physical or even mental, there is nothing more valuable than the ability to be on your own and still be happy.

Too many people in this world are relying on the behaviour of others to make them happy, but wonder why they are always left disappointed. They don’t seem to appreciate that you have no control over the behaviour of others, ultimately if they want to mess you around or treat you badly, you can’t do anything about it except adjust your own attitude.

I’ve forgiven people for some pretty horrid behaviour over the years and sometimes I’m asked why – I always respond, because it doesn’t have any impact on me beyond being upset. That person has to live with the knowledge of how they have treated me and my hating them for it will only make me unhappy and bitter – why would I want to introduce that unhappiness into my own life? As I said on my Facebook page the other day – not relying on others to make you happy is the greatest power of all. Of course we need others to bring light into our lives in other ways – to put a smile on our face after a hard day, to crack a joke when we’re mad, or do thoughtful things, but what happens on the day when they aren’t there? You need to be able to build yourself back up instead of just expecting others to do it for you.

  • I’ve always been a very independent person, but before coming travelling I was a lot more emotionally dependent on others.
  • Travelling solo has given me the space and the time to get to know myself better, it has meant learning to look after myself when times are tough and boy, have they been tough sometimes.
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I remember being pulled out of a crashed minibus which was half buried in a ditch, I’d been thrown against the windscreen and would have gone through it if it weren’t for the driver grabbing hold of me. I stood on the side of the road with blood pouring from my legs, with a group of Cambodians who spoke barely any English, and remember thinking, I genuinely don’t know if I’ll make it out of this one.

Being in a situation like that, being forced to look after yourself and to get yourself to safety in a city that is still a hundred miles away is quite a challenge. But I did it, and I’m a stronger person for it. Now I don’t want anyone to go through anything like that, but there are ways to teach yourself the value of independence without putting yourself in danger.

Just taking a tiny step outside your comfort zone and doing it all by yourself is the most valuable experience of all – it can mean disappearing off one day and exploring a place you’ve never been before, forcing yourself to eat out alone, dealing with something complicated all by yourself instead of seeking help from parents or a partner.

  • All of these are things I do on a daily basis now – I love to eat out alone, I love the satisfaction of managing to deal with a problem completely by myself or turning up in a place where no-one knows me and no-one in the world knows where I am.
  • Some people call that brave, I call it just living my life one step at a time and taking chances.

So far it’s paid off better than I ever could have imagined and it could be the same for everyone. Being independent is one of the most empowering feelings I have ever known. Some say to love and be loved is the greatest thing of all, but I think that being brave enough to say “I got this shit” to yourself and to others every damn day and proving it again and again is the one to aim for.

Asked By: Simon Scott Date: created: May 10 2024

Why do Celtic and Liverpool sing the same song

Answered By: Carter Torres Date: created: May 12 2024

I am a Liverpool supporter and my work collegues are Celtic fan and we have been arguing about who were the first set of supporters to sing You”ll never walk alone. Surely it was Liverpool wasn”t it? | Notes and Queries | guardian.co.uk I am a Liverpool supporter and my work collegues are Celtic fan and we have been arguing about who were the first set of supporters to sing You’ll never walk alone.

  • Liverpool fans were the first to sing “You’ll never walk alone” soon after Gerry and the Pacemakers made the record in the early sixties. It is on record (via B.B.C. video tapes) that the first versions of this as a football anthem were at Anfield. Yes, I was there!
    • Ray Mitcham, Southport Merseyside
  • I’m also a Liverpool fan but I’m afraid it was the Celtic fans who started singing our beloved anthem. It came from us having Bob Paisley as manager in the seventies. It was well known he was Celtic daft so the Liverpool fans adopted You’ll never walk alone to make Bob feel at home.
    1. Freddie Boswell, Liverpool
  • I don’t know whether we (ie Liverpool fans) were first, but our singing of Gerry’s anthem long predates Bob Paisley at Anfield.
    • Kathy, Broughton-in-Furness UK
  • Dunno who was first but today I heard Kiri Te Kanawa’s version. Mind-bogglingly bad, and not even funny.
    1. Carla, Crewe UK

Celtic fans are pretty confident that we started the ‘Walk Alone’ singing, but there is one area that is definately not in doubt so lets get it on the record now. The Huddle is ours, so please, no revisionism on this one Reds! Claire Higgins, Ballymena, Co. Antrim N. of Ireland

  • In the sixties, tunes from the top ten were played during the interval at matches played in Liverpool. When “You’ll never walk alone” was played it caught on as an anthem.
    • Cyril Young, Alumim Israel
  • The Anfield officials would play the number one song at that particular time, 1963, over the PA before home games. Since “You’ll Never Walk Alone” was number one 5 weeks running over October and November, also number one the week JFK was assassinated, the Kop kept singing anyway even when it stopped playing over the PA. Liverpool and Celtic met in a number of friendlies and testamonials for players such as Ron Yeats, Tommy Burns, Billy McNiell and Celtic manager Jock Stein and thats where it is believed Celtic adopted the song. The Celtic supporters only sung it intermittenly during the 70’s and it wasn’t until the friendly with Liverpool directly after Hillsborough in 1989 that it was sung on a regular basis. BBC Panorama did a doco on the Kop in the early 60’s and more or less attributed the Kop as the modern birthplace of singing and chanting. “We shall not be moved” and “When the saint goes marching in” are just a few that attributed to the Kop.
    1. Josh, New Zealand
  • The idea that somehow or other Celtic were first to sing “You’ll Never Walk Alone” is some kind of urban myth that has taken on a life of its own, thanks to the unthinking and gullible. As others have pointed out, apart from the folk memory of the Kop, the evidence of Liverpool’s association with the song was actually recorded by the BBC in the early 1960s. Celtic picked up on the song after coming to Anfield in a string of friendlies in the 1970s. I was present at all of them and can confirm that far from singing YNWA at Ron Yeats’s testimonial, for instance, the Celtic fans ‘entertained’ the Scousers with the usual collection of sectarian anthems as well as a hail of missiles. In the interests of balance I should point out that Rangers’s record in this area is no better than Celtic’s.
    • David, Glasgow UK
  • Liverpool started singin it in the early 60s when Gerry And The Pacemakers had a hit with the song.in Anfield, before the matches a DJ would play the top 10 songs through the PA system starting from 10 and finishing with 1, YNWA was number 1 for 5 weeks in a row so for those 5 weeks it was played just before the kick off and the members of the Kop would sing along. When YNWA went down in the charts past number 10 the fans started to chant “Wheres our song? Wheres our song?” so the DJ decided to keep playing it and it is still played before matches to this day, also the LFC fans sing it when our team is in a bad spot (or if we are winning!) and after most games.without the help of the PA system. It wasn’t until the 70s when Celtic and Liverpool had a string of friendly games and the LFC supporters sang our song that the Celtic Supporters picked it up.
    1. Dylan Tiernan, Galway Ireland
  • I’m an enthusiastic Celtic supporter with a vast VHS & DVD collection of previous matches. The earliest known recording of Celtic singing “You’ll Never Walk Alone” is dated 1970 in opposition to Leeds United. If my video collection is anything to go by, the song simply was not performed all that often during the 1970s; most of the recordings are dated 1986 onwards.
    • Mark F. Dunne, Glasgow, UK
  • Several replies have stated that the song was not sang too often in the 70’s by Celtic supporters. I went to just about every home game in 1976 to 1878 and I can assure you it was sung when the players were entering the pitch to start the game
    1. Cliff Hobson, Wyoming Australia
  • I am not overly concerned about who sang ‘You’ll Never Walk Alone’ first, all I will say is most of the quotes I have read here are taken from an article published a wee while back where it was claimed that Celtic did not start singing that anthem till the 70’s! Rubbish, Celtic fans were singing that anthem when I first started supporting the hoops in 1968 when I was 11, and I’m pretty sure they just didn’t do it for my benefit, which means the song was being sung well before that!! It MAY have been the Reds who were first? but the most important fact IS, Celtic fans sing it better and louder and truer in sound to Gerry’s version! Hail Hail
    • John Hunter, Glasgow Scotland

: I am a Liverpool supporter and my work collegues are Celtic fan and we have been arguing about who were the first set of supporters to sing You”ll never walk alone. Surely it was Liverpool wasn”t it? | Notes and Queries | guardian.co.uk

Is it safe to walk alone at night in Liverpool?

Is Liverpool safe for solo female travellers? – Reviews & Safety Tips Liverpool is generally safe for solo female travellers. The city is well-policed and has a low crime rate, so visitors can feel secure when exploring the city. Liverpool is also a friendly and welcoming city, and there are plenty of attractions and activities to enjoy.

  1. Solo female travellers should take the usual precautions when travelling, such as avoiding dark alleys and being aware of their surroundings, but overall Liverpool is a safe and enjoyable destination.
  2. Liverpool can be a safe destination for solo female travelers, but it’s important to take some precautions to ensure your safety.

Here are some safety tips for solo female travelers in Liverpool:

Be aware of your surroundings at all times and trust your instincts. If something doesn’t feel right, move away from the area. Try to avoid walking alone at night, especially in unfamiliar areas. If you must walk alone, stay in well-lit areas and be aware of your surroundings. Never accept rides from strangers, even if they seem friendly. Don’t carry large amounts of cash with you. Use a credit or debit card instead. Keep your valuables secure at all times. Don’t leave them unattended in public places. Don’t display expensive items such as jewelry or electronics. Choose a safe area to stay in. Research the area before you book your accommodation. Let someone know where you are going and when you expect to return. Use public transportation whenever possible. Avoid taking taxis alone. Carry a personal alarm with you in case of an emergency.

: Is Liverpool safe for solo female travellers? – Reviews & Safety Tips

Asked By: Isaac Perez Date: created: Oct 09 2023

What are Liverpool fans called

Answered By: Sebastian Jones Date: created: Oct 11 2023

Nicknames

Liverpool Football Club Liverpool FC Liverpool Football Team Liv Liverpool LFC

Liverpool Football Club is a professional football club in Liverpool, England, which competes in the Premier League, the top tier of English football. The club has won 5 European Cups, 3 UEFA Cups, 3 UEFA Super Cups, 18 League titles, 7 FA Cups, 8 League Cups, and 15 FA Community Shields. Founded in 1892, the club joined the Football League the following year and has played at Anfield since its formation. Liverpool established itself as a major force in English and European football in the 1970s and 1980s when Bill Shankly and Bob Paisley led the club to 11 League titles and seven European trophies. Under the management of Rafael Benítez and captained by Steven Gerrard, Liverpool became European champions for the fifth time in 2005. Liverpool was the ninth highest-earning football club in the world in 2016-17, with an annual revenue of EUR424.2 million, and the world’s eighth most valuable football club in 2017, valued at $1.492 billion. The club has long-standing rivalries with Manchester United and Everton. The club’s supporters have been involved in two major tragedies: the Heysel Stadium disaster, where escaping fans were pressed against a collapsing wall at the 1985 European Cup Final in Brussels, with 39 people-mostly Italians and Juventus fans-dying, after which English clubs were given a five-year ban from European competition, and the Hillsborough disaster in 1989, where 96 Liverpool supporters died in a crush against perimeter fencing. The team changed from red shirts and white shorts to an all-red home strip in 1964 which has been used ever since. The club’s anthem is “You’ll Never Walk Alone”. Liverpool F.C. was founded following a dispute between the Everton committee and John Houlding, club president and owner of the land at Anfield. After eight years at the stadium, Everton relocated to Goodison Park in 1892 and Houlding founded Liverpool F.C. to play at Anfield. Originally named “Everton F.C. and Athletic Grounds Ltd” (Everton Athletic for short), the club became Liverpool F.C. in March 1892 and gained official recognition three months later, after The Football Association refused to recognise the club as Everton. The team won the Lancashire League in its début season, and joined the Football League Second Division at the start of the 1893-94 season. After finishing in first place the club was promoted to the First Division, which it won in 1901 and again in 1906. Liverpool reached its first FA Cup Final in 1914, losing 1-0 to Burnley. It won consecutive League championships in 1922 and 1923, but did not win another trophy until the 1946-47 season, when the club won the First Division for a fifth time under the control of ex-West Ham Utd centre half George Kay. Liverpool suffered its second Cup Final defeat in 1950, playing against Arsenal. The club was relegated to the Second Division in the 1953-54 season. Soon after Liverpool lost 2-1 to non-league Worcester City in the 1958-59 FA Cup, Bill Shankly was appointed manager. Upon his arrival he released 24 players and converted a boot storage room at Anfield into a room where the coaches could discuss strategy; here, Shankly and other “Boot Room” members Joe Fagan, Reuben Bennett, and Bob Paisley began reshaping the team. The club was promoted back into the First Division in 1962 and won it in 1964, for the first time in 17 years. In 1965, the club won its first FA Cup. In 1966, the club won the First Division but lost to Borussia Dortmund in the European Cup Winners’ Cup final. Liverpool won both the League and the UEFA Cup during the 1972-73 season, and the FA Cup again a year later. Shankly retired soon afterwards and was replaced by his assistant, Bob Paisley. In 1976, Paisley’s second season as manager, the club won another League and UEFA Cup double. The following season, the club retained the League title and won the European Cup for the first time, but it lost in the 1977 FA Cup Final. Liverpool retained the European Cup in 1978 and regained the First Division title in 1979. During Paisley’s nine seasons as manager Liverpool won 21 trophies, including three European Cups, a UEFA Cup, six League titles and three consecutive League Cups; the only domestic trophy he did not win was the FA Cup. Paisley retired in 1983 and was replaced by his assistant, Joe Fagan. Liverpool won the League, League Cup and European Cup in Fagan’s first season, becoming the first English side to win three trophies in a season.] Liverpool reached the European Cup final again in 1985, against Juventus at the Heysel Stadium. Before kick-off, Liverpool fans breached a fence which separated the two groups of supporters, and charged the Juventus fans. The resulting weight of people caused a retaining wall to collapse, killing 39 fans, mostly Italians. The incident became known as the Heysel Stadium disaster. The match was played in spite of protests by both managers, and Liverpool lost 1-0 to Juventus. As a result of the tragedy, English clubs were banned from participating in European competition for five years; Liverpool received a ten-year ban, which was later reduced to six years. Fourteen Liverpool fans received convictions for involuntary manslaughter. Fagan had announced his retirement just before the disaster and Kenny Dalglish was appointed as player-manager. During his tenure, the club won another three League Championships and two FA Cups, including a League and Cup “Double” in the 1985-86 season. Liverpool’s success was overshadowed by the Hillsborough disaster: in an FA Cup semi-final against Nottingham Forest on 15 April 1989, hundreds of Liverpool fans were crushed against perimeter fencing. Ninety-four fans died that day; the 95th victim died in hospital from his injuries four days later and the 96th died nearly four years later, without regaining consciousness. After the Hillsborough disaster there was a government review of stadium safety. The resulting Taylor Report paved the way for legislation that required top-division teams to have all-seater stadiums. The report ruled that the main reason for the disaster was overcrowding due to a failure of police control. Liverpool was involved in the closest finish to a league season during the 1988-89 season. Liverpool finished equal with Arsenal on both points and goal difference, but lost the title on total goals scored when Arsenal scored the final goal in the last minute of the season. Dalglish cited the Hillsborough disaster and its repercussions as the reason for his resignation in 1991; he was replaced by former player Graeme Souness. Under his leadership Liverpool won the 1992 FA Cup Final, but their league performances slumped, with two consecutive sixth-place finishes, eventually resulting in his dismissal in January 1994. Souness was replaced by Roy Evans, and Liverpool went on to win the 1995 Football League Cup Final. While they made some title challenges under Evans, third-place finishes in 1996 and 1998 were the best they could manage, and so Gérard Houllier was appointed co-manager in the 1998-99 season, and became the sole manager in November 1998 after Evans resigned. In 2001, Houllier’s second full season in charge, Liverpool won a “Treble”: the FA Cup, League Cup and UEFA Cup. Houllier underwent major heart surgery during the 2001-02 season and Liverpool finished second in the League, behind Arsenal. They won a further League Cup in 2003, but failed to mount a title challenge in the two seasons that followed. Houllier was replaced by Rafael Benítez at the end of the 2003-04 season. Despite finishing fifth in Benítez’s first season, Liverpool won the 2004-05 UEFA Champions League, beating A.C. Milan 3-2 in a penalty shootout after the match ended with a score of 3-3. The following season, Liverpool finished third in the Premier League and won the 2006 FA Cup Final, beating West Ham United in a penalty shootout after the match finished 3-3. American businessmen George Gillett and Tom Hicks became the owners of the club during the 2006-07 season, in a deal which valued the club and its outstanding debts at £218.9 million. The club reached the 2007 UEFA Champions League Final against Milan, as it had in 2005, but lost 2-1. During the 2008-09 season Liverpool achieved 86 points, its highest Premier League points total, and finished as runners up to Manchester United. In the 2009-10 season, Liverpool finished seventh in the Premier League and failed to qualify for the Champions League. Benítez subsequently left by mutual consent and was replaced by Fulham manager Roy Hodgson. At the start of the 2010-11 season Liverpool was on the verge of bankruptcy and the club’s creditors asked the High Court to allow the sale of the club, overruling the wishes of Hicks and Gillett. John W. Henry, owner of the Boston Red Sox and of Fenway Sports Group, bid successfully for the club and took ownership in October 2010. Poor results during the start of that season led to Hodgson leaving the club by mutual consent and former player and manager Kenny Dalglish taking over. In the 2011-12 season, Liverpool secured a record 8th League Cup success and reached the FA Cup final, but finished in eighth position, the worst league finish in 18 years; this led to the sacking of Dalglish. He was replaced by Brendan Rodgers, whose Liverpool team in the 2013-14 season mounted an unexpected title charge to finish second behind champions Manchester City and subsequently return to the Champions League, scoring 101 goals in the process, the most since the 106 scored in the 1895-96 season. Following a disappointing 2014-15 season, where Liverpool finished sixth in the league, and a poor start to the following campaign, Rodgers was sacked in October 2015. He was replaced by Jürgen Klopp, who in his first season at Liverpool, took the club to the finals of both the Football League Cup and UEFA Europa League, finishing as runner-up in both competitions. Liverpool is one of the best supported clubs in Europe. The club states that its worldwide fan base includes more than 200 officially recognised Club of the LFC Official Supporters Clubs in at least 50 countries. Notable groups include Spirit of Shankly and Reclaim The Kop. The club takes advantage of this support through its worldwide summer tours. Liverpool fans often refer to themselves as Kopites, a reference to the fans who once stood, and now sit, on the Kop at Anfield. In 2008 a group of fans decided to form a splinter club, A.F.C. Liverpool, to play matches for fans who had been priced out of watching Premier League football. The song “You’ll Never Walk Alone”, originally from the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical Carousel and later recorded by Liverpool musicians Gerry & The Pacemakers, is the club’s anthem and has been sung by the Anfield crowd since the early 1960s. It has since gained popularity among fans of other clubs around the world. The song’s title adorns the top of the Shankly Gates, which were unveiled on 2 August 1982 in memory of former manager Bill Shankly. The “You’ll Never Walk Alone” portion of the Shankly Gates is also reproduced on the club’s crest. The club’s supporters have been involved in two stadium disasters. The first was the 1985 Heysel Stadium disaster, in which 39 Juventus supporters were killed. They were confined to a corner by Liverpool fans who had charged in their direction; the weight of the cornered fans caused a wall to collapse. UEFA laid the blame for the incident solely on the Liverpool supporters, and banned all English clubs from European competition for five years. Liverpool was banned for an additional year, preventing it from participating in the 1990-91 European Cup, even though it won the League in 1990. Twenty-seven fans were arrested on suspicion of manslaughter and were extradited to Belgium in 1987 to face trial. In 1989, after a five-month trial in Belgium, 14 Liverpool fans were given three-year sentences for involuntary manslaughter; half of the terms were suspended. The second disaster took place during an FA Cup semi-final between Liverpool and Nottingham Forest at Hillsborough Stadium, Sheffield, on 15 April 1989. Ninety-six Liverpool fans died as a consequence of overcrowding at the Leppings Lane end, in what became known as the Hillsborough disaster. In the following days The Sun newspaper published an article entitled “The Truth”, in which it claimed that Liverpool fans had robbed the dead and had urinated on and attacked the police. Subsequent investigations proved the allegations false, leading to a boycott of the newspaper by Liverpool fans across the city and elsewhere; many still refuse to buy The Sun more than 20 years later. Many support organisations were set up in the wake of the disaster, such as the Hillsborough Justice Campaign, which represents bereaved families, survivors and supporters in their efforts to secure justice. – IMDb Mini Biography By: ahmetkozan

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Asked By: Gregory Stewart Date: created: Jun 27 2023

Who had a hit in 1985 with You’ll Never Walk Alone

Answered By: Gabriel Lopez Date: created: Jun 30 2023

‘You’ll Never Walk Alone’: From Broadway Tear-Jerker to Covid-Era Anthem (Published 2020) Versions of the “Carousel” song by Aretha Franklin, Gerry and the Pacemakers and Liverpool F.C. fans have turned it into something universal. The many forms of a show tune, from left: a Liverpool F.C. fan, Aretha Franklin and Shirley Jones with Gordon MacRae in the film “Carousel.” Credit.20th Century Fox; Neon, via Associated Press; Chris Hyde/Getty Images “Walk on, walk on/With hope in your heart/And you’ll never walk alone.” Many Americans know “You’ll Never Walk Alone” as the emotional peak of Act II in the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical “Carousel.” But in the 75 years since the number was first heard on Broadway, it has blossomed into a global anthem that strikes a strong chord during tough times.

In recent weeks, it has come to embody the resilience, solidarity and need for promise required in the battle against the coronavirus — and suddenly, it seems everywhere, including a brief moment at the top of the British singles chart. Here are a few steps in the song’s evolution. This clip from the 1956 Hollywood adaptation helps set up the song in the musical’s story line: The violent Billy Bigelow (Gordon MacRae) has died and his wife, Julie (Shirley Jones), is consoled by her cousin Nettie Fowler (Claramae Turner), who sings of succor and hope.

“Carousel” opened on Broadway on April 19, 1945, and recorded a string-heavy, shortly after. Covers have been pouring out since. You may have heard of this other Liverpool hit machine managed by Brian Epstein and produced by George Martin in the early 1960s — that’s not surprising, since Gerry and the Pacemakers’ first three singles all topped the British charts.

  1. Their third No.1 was “You’ll Never Walk Alone,” performed in 1963 with a gentle pop lilt rather than the original’s operatic grandeur.
  2. In 1985, the frontman Gerry Marsden took the song to No.1 again with, a supergroup convened to raise funds in the aftermath of the Bradford City stadium fire, which killed 56 people at a soccer match.

“You’ll Never Walk Alone” is such a part of Liverpool F.C. that the title is on the soccer club’s and engraved atop Anfield stadium’s Shankly Gates. Almost immediately after Gerry and the Pacemakers turned it into a hit, the team’s supporters embraced the song as their anthem.

  1. Britain has a long, proud tradition of full-throated fans enlivening matches with chants, but few have the goosebump-triggering power of “You’ll Never Walk Alone” rising out of a sea of red shirts.
  2. The last minute of Pink Floyd’s mellow off the band’s 1971 album “Meddle,” also integrates the sound of Liverpool fans singing “You’ll Never Walk Alone.”) In 1964, the French singer Richard Anthony (real name: Ricardo Anthony Btesh) came out with a translation that took some liberties with the original, as most adaptations at the time were wont.

Suddenly, “You’ll Never Walk Alone” was a forlorn breakup ballad: “Only you, always you, I love you” and so on. To cover more of the European market, Anthony also recorded versions in and, On their second album, “Boom,” the garage-punk band the Sonics led their own “Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark” with a quote from the Rodgers and Hammerstein tune.

While “You’ll Never Walk Alone” is meant to be reassuring, the singer Gerry Roslie quickly morphs into the slightly menacing character you’d expect fronting a band whose signature songs were “Psycho” and “Strychnine.” Drum and bugle corps have always built their repertoire out of a mix of contemporary hits, show tunes and classical pieces, but few have been identified with a song for as long as the : “You’ll Never Walk Alone” has been part of this Wisconsin ensemble’s repertoire since the mid-1950s.

Never underestimate the power of a large horn line gradually amping up until it can blow the hat off your head. For decades, Jerry Lewis concluded his annual telethon to raise funds for the Muscular Dystrophy Association by singing you-know-what. But this did not lessen the emotional impact for him, as you can see from this 2010 video, in which he performed “You’ll Never Walk Alone” for what he said was the 59th — and, unbeknown to him, the last — time.

Since his first telethon was in 1966, this means his association with the song went back even earlier.) Aretha Franklin brought out the song’s spirituality on her best-selling gospel album “Amazing Grace,” recorded live with James Cleveland and the Southern California Community Choir in 1972. (A was finally unveiled in late 2018.) The track starts simply enough, with just Franklin and a piano.

The band and choir come in around the four-minute mark, yet they don’t unleash their full power, and the song keeps simmering. The controlled intensity is maybe even more effective than a raise-the-roof escalation. Of course, escalation is great, too. Patti LaBelle and the Blue Belles recorded “You’ll Never Walk Alone” in 1962, and a from the Apollo has a casual amble — though that seemingly tossed-off final note reminds everybody who’s boss — sustained by the era’s trademark punchy soul arrangements.

  1. But it’s another Apollo performance that brings the audience to its feet, or perhaps knees.
  2. Everything is turned to 11 in 1985: the towering crest, the amped-up gospel choir, the electric delivery, the fake ending two-thirds of the way through followed by LaBelle taking everybody back to church.
  3. Hit that replay button one more time.

In April, “You’ll Never Walk Alone” topped the British singles chart again, helmed — we’ve come full circle — by a musical-theater performer. Exerting maximum pressure on the lacrimal glands, the track combines the voices of Michael Ball (“Les Misérables,” “Phantom of the Opera”); Thomas Moore, a.k.a.

A 100-year-old World War II veteran who raised millions of pounds for charity by walking around his garden); and the NHS Voices of Care Choir. This cover somewhat eclipsed concurrent ones by the Mumford & Sons frontman and by, There is a very good chance you will tear up at this viral video of a Dutch hospital’s paramedics, nurses and doctors singing to each other through a glass door.

Slicker, and perhaps a little bit more self-serving is a, which edits together pictures of essential workers and footage of her performing “You’ll Never Walk Alone” in tribute to the Sept.11 victims at the end of the 2001 Emmy Awards. More upbeat is the, recorded “for the brave who care for the sick, for everyone who stays at home to save others.

Who sang you’ll never walk alone in the 50s?

Legacy – Hamilton was inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame in 2010. Hamilton was Epic Records ‘ first star, giving the company its first number-one hit of any kind, “You’ll Never Walk Alone”, which topped the Billboard R&B chart for eight weeks in 1954.

A year later, he gave the label its second number-one hit of any kind when his version of “Unchained Melody” topped the Billboard R&B chart for three weeks. Also, with “Unchained Melody”, Hamilton became the first solo artist to deliver a top-ten pop hit for Epic. Hamilton was the singer who inspired Sam Cooke, then a gospel music star, to switch over to secular music,

Hamilton was also the one to whom Cooke first submitted his early pop-song compositions. Hamilton’s distinctive sound was a big influence on Elvis Presley’s ballad singing. As author Fred L. Worth noted, “Elvis greatly admired Hamilton’s singing ability and style and performed a number of his ballads in Hamilton’s style.” Also, The Righteous Brothers emulated Hamilton’s style to create their blue-eyed soul sound.

  • This is particularly evident in the duo’s cover versions of his hits “You’ll Never Walk Alone”, “Ebb Tide” and “Unchained Melody”.
  • Hamilton’s “You’ll Never Walk Alone” disc was brought in from the US by a sailor friend of Gerry and the Pacemakers leader Gerry Marsden,
  • As a result, the band recorded a UK version of the song which became the anthem for Liverpool Football Club, sung by the crowd before every home game.

The sailor friend noted that Marsden “puts very similar inflections into the song, trying to get it very similar to Roy Hamilton’s version.”

Who sang You’ll Never Walk Alone in the 50’s?

1954 HITS ARCHIVE: You’ll Never Walk Alone – Roy Hamilton – YouTube.

Who released You’ll Never Walk Alone in 1985?

The Crowd (2) – You’ll Never Walk Alone.